zamknij [x]
do:

Sztuka z martwych zwierząt (16)

EN_01373506_0001 MDR
Meghan calls this one 'kitten with a whip'. MISSISSIPPI, USA: THIS BEAUTY SCHOOL DROPOUT who preferred to work on DEAD ANIMALS than live people became an ethical taxidermist, but she admits that people are still surprised to see a FEMALE taxidermist. Owner of Bunny Lace Taxidermy, Meghan Cunningham (38) from Mississippi, USA, once worked in the beauty industry but after seeing a taxidermy tutorial she became more interested in creating looks for animals rather than people. In 2012, while at beauty school, Meghan saw a tutorial for taxidermy, and she became intrigued by the art. However, Meghan wanted to find ways to ethically source her animals because she didn???t want animals to die for her hobby. Having always had a creative background, the appeal of taxidermy lay in the sculpting opportunities. So, Meghan left beauty school and began sourcing dead wildlife to begin her new hobby. The first dead animals Meghan found were roadkill, which she still uses frequently. Meghan???s home, which she shares with her husband Bryan, is located near a farm and any casualties are donated to her. Unlike traditional taxidermists, Meghan doesn???t mount trophy animals, preferring to mount rabbits, squirrels, house cats, possums and bobcats. Meghan estimates that she has mounted over 700 animals, with each one taking approximately two-and-a-half weeks to complete. Through her work, Meghan tries to honour the life of every animal she transforms and to bring happiness to it by creating colourful sets and costumes. mediadrumworld.com / Meghan Cunningham
EN_01373506_0002 MDR
MISSISSIPPI, USA: THIS BEAUTY SCHOOL DROPOUT who preferred to work on DEAD ANIMALS than live people became an ethical taxidermist, but she admits that people are still surprised to see a FEMALE taxidermist. Owner of Bunny Lace Taxidermy, Meghan Cunningham (38) from Mississippi, USA, once worked in the beauty industry but after seeing a taxidermy tutorial she became more interested in creating looks for animals rather than people. In 2012, while at beauty school, Meghan saw a tutorial for taxidermy, and she became intrigued by the art. However, Meghan wanted to find ways to ethically source her animals because she didn???t want animals to die for her hobby. Having always had a creative background, the appeal of taxidermy lay in the sculpting opportunities. So, Meghan left beauty school and began sourcing dead wildlife to begin her new hobby. The first dead animals Meghan found were roadkill, which she still uses frequently. Meghan???s home, which she shares with her husband Bryan, is located near a farm and any casualties are donated to her. Unlike traditional taxidermists, Meghan doesn???t mount trophy animals, preferring to mount rabbits, squirrels, house cats, possums and bobcats. Meghan estimates that she has mounted over 700 animals, with each one taking approximately two-and-a-half weeks to complete. Through her work, Meghan tries to honour the life of every animal she transforms and to bring happiness to it by creating colourful sets and costumes. mediadrumworld.com / Meghan Cunningham
FBMD2300096b01000050290000d0380000294a00009db2000014d80000ea010100a12d0100034d0100047b0100
EN_01373506_0003 MDR
Meghan creating one of her projects. MISSISSIPPI, USA: THIS BEAUTY SCHOOL DROPOUT who preferred to work on DEAD ANIMALS than live people became an ethical taxidermist, but she admits that people are still surprised to see a FEMALE taxidermist. Owner of Bunny Lace Taxidermy, Meghan Cunningham (38) from Mississippi, USA, once worked in the beauty industry but after seeing a taxidermy tutorial she became more interested in creating looks for animals rather than people. In 2012, while at beauty school, Meghan saw a tutorial for taxidermy, and she became intrigued by the art. However, Meghan wanted to find ways to ethically source her animals because she didn???t want animals to die for her hobby. Having always had a creative background, the appeal of taxidermy lay in the sculpting opportunities. So, Meghan left beauty school and began sourcing dead wildlife to begin her new hobby. The first dead animals Meghan found were roadkill, which she still uses frequently. Meghan???s home, which she shares with her husband Bryan, is located near a farm and any casualties are donated to her. Unlike traditional taxidermists, Meghan doesn???t mount trophy animals, preferring to mount rabbits, squirrels, house cats, possums and bobcats. Meghan estimates that she has mounted over 700 animals, with each one taking approximately two-and-a-half weeks to complete. Through her work, Meghan tries to honour the life of every animal she transforms and to bring happiness to it by creating colourful sets and costumes. mediadrumworld.com / Meghan Cunningham
EN_01373506_0004 MDR
Meghan creating one of her projects. MISSISSIPPI, USA: THIS BEAUTY SCHOOL DROPOUT who preferred to work on DEAD ANIMALS than live people became an ethical taxidermist, but she admits that people are still surprised to see a FEMALE taxidermist. Owner of Bunny Lace Taxidermy, Meghan Cunningham (38) from Mississippi, USA, once worked in the beauty industry but after seeing a taxidermy tutorial she became more interested in creating looks for animals rather than people. In 2012, while at beauty school, Meghan saw a tutorial for taxidermy, and she became intrigued by the art. However, Meghan wanted to find ways to ethically source her animals because she didn???t want animals to die for her hobby. Having always had a creative background, the appeal of taxidermy lay in the sculpting opportunities. So, Meghan left beauty school and began sourcing dead wildlife to begin her new hobby. The first dead animals Meghan found were roadkill, which she still uses frequently. Meghan???s home, which she shares with her husband Bryan, is located near a farm and any casualties are donated to her. Unlike traditional taxidermists, Meghan doesn???t mount trophy animals, preferring to mount rabbits, squirrels, house cats, possums and bobcats. Meghan estimates that she has mounted over 700 animals, with each one taking approximately two-and-a-half weeks to complete. Through her work, Meghan tries to honour the life of every animal she transforms and to bring happiness to it by creating colourful sets and costumes. mediadrumworld.com / Meghan Cunningham
EN_01373506_0005 MDR
A dead rabbit in a custom built set. MISSISSIPPI, USA: THIS BEAUTY SCHOOL DROPOUT who preferred to work on DEAD ANIMALS than live people became an ethical taxidermist, but she admits that people are still surprised to see a FEMALE taxidermist. Owner of Bunny Lace Taxidermy, Meghan Cunningham (38) from Mississippi, USA, once worked in the beauty industry but after seeing a taxidermy tutorial she became more interested in creating looks for animals rather than people. In 2012, while at beauty school, Meghan saw a tutorial for taxidermy, and she became intrigued by the art. However, Meghan wanted to find ways to ethically source her animals because she didn???t want animals to die for her hobby. Having always had a creative background, the appeal of taxidermy lay in the sculpting opportunities. So, Meghan left beauty school and began sourcing dead wildlife to begin her new hobby. The first dead animals Meghan found were roadkill, which she still uses frequently. Meghan???s home, which she shares with her husband Bryan, is located near a farm and any casualties are donated to her. Unlike traditional taxidermists, Meghan doesn???t mount trophy animals, preferring to mount rabbits, squirrels, house cats, possums and bobcats. Meghan estimates that she has mounted over 700 animals, with each one taking approximately two-and-a-half weeks to complete. Through her work, Meghan tries to honour the life of every animal she transforms and to bring happiness to it by creating colourful sets and costumes. mediadrumworld.com / Meghan Cunningham
EN_01373506_0006 MDR
Meghan creating one of her projects. MISSISSIPPI, USA: THIS BEAUTY SCHOOL DROPOUT who preferred to work on DEAD ANIMALS than live people became an ethical taxidermist, but she admits that people are still surprised to see a FEMALE taxidermist. Owner of Bunny Lace Taxidermy, Meghan Cunningham (38) from Mississippi, USA, once worked in the beauty industry but after seeing a taxidermy tutorial she became more interested in creating looks for animals rather than people. In 2012, while at beauty school, Meghan saw a tutorial for taxidermy, and she became intrigued by the art. However, Meghan wanted to find ways to ethically source her animals because she didn???t want animals to die for her hobby. Having always had a creative background, the appeal of taxidermy lay in the sculpting opportunities. So, Meghan left beauty school and began sourcing dead wildlife to begin her new hobby. The first dead animals Meghan found were roadkill, which she still uses frequently. Meghan???s home, which she shares with her husband Bryan, is located near a farm and any casualties are donated to her. Unlike traditional taxidermists, Meghan doesn???t mount trophy animals, preferring to mount rabbits, squirrels, house cats, possums and bobcats. Meghan estimates that she has mounted over 700 animals, with each one taking approximately two-and-a-half weeks to complete. Through her work, Meghan tries to honour the life of every animal she transforms and to bring happiness to it by creating colourful sets and costumes. mediadrumworld.com / Meghan Cunningham
EN_01373506_0007 MDR
An ethically sourced dead squirrel. MISSISSIPPI, USA: THIS BEAUTY SCHOOL DROPOUT who preferred to work on DEAD ANIMALS than live people became an ethical taxidermist, but she admits that people are still surprised to see a FEMALE taxidermist. Owner of Bunny Lace Taxidermy, Meghan Cunningham (38) from Mississippi, USA, once worked in the beauty industry but after seeing a taxidermy tutorial she became more interested in creating looks for animals rather than people. In 2012, while at beauty school, Meghan saw a tutorial for taxidermy, and she became intrigued by the art. However, Meghan wanted to find ways to ethically source her animals because she didn???t want animals to die for her hobby. Having always had a creative background, the appeal of taxidermy lay in the sculpting opportunities. So, Meghan left beauty school and began sourcing dead wildlife to begin her new hobby. The first dead animals Meghan found were roadkill, which she still uses frequently. Meghan???s home, which she shares with her husband Bryan, is located near a farm and any casualties are donated to her. Unlike traditional taxidermists, Meghan doesn???t mount trophy animals, preferring to mount rabbits, squirrels, house cats, possums and bobcats. Meghan estimates that she has mounted over 700 animals, with each one taking approximately two-and-a-half weeks to complete. Through her work, Meghan tries to honour the life of every animal she transforms and to bring happiness to it by creating colourful sets and costumes. mediadrumworld.com / Meghan Cunningham
EN_01373506_0008 MDR
A carousel of squirrels. MISSISSIPPI, USA: THIS BEAUTY SCHOOL DROPOUT who preferred to work on DEAD ANIMALS than live people became an ethical taxidermist, but she admits that people are still surprised to see a FEMALE taxidermist. Owner of Bunny Lace Taxidermy, Meghan Cunningham (38) from Mississippi, USA, once worked in the beauty industry but after seeing a taxidermy tutorial she became more interested in creating looks for animals rather than people. In 2012, while at beauty school, Meghan saw a tutorial for taxidermy, and she became intrigued by the art. However, Meghan wanted to find ways to ethically source her animals because she didn???t want animals to die for her hobby. Having always had a creative background, the appeal of taxidermy lay in the sculpting opportunities. So, Meghan left beauty school and began sourcing dead wildlife to begin her new hobby. The first dead animals Meghan found were roadkill, which she still uses frequently. Meghan???s home, which she shares with her husband Bryan, is located near a farm and any casualties are donated to her. Unlike traditional taxidermists, Meghan doesn???t mount trophy animals, preferring to mount rabbits, squirrels, house cats, possums and bobcats. Meghan estimates that she has mounted over 700 animals, with each one taking approximately two-and-a-half weeks to complete. Through her work, Meghan tries to honour the life of every animal she transforms and to bring happiness to it by creating colourful sets and costumes. mediadrumworld.com / Meghan Cunningham
EN_01373506_0009 MDR
Roller skating bobcat. MISSISSIPPI, USA: THIS BEAUTY SCHOOL DROPOUT who preferred to work on DEAD ANIMALS than live people became an ethical taxidermist, but she admits that people are still surprised to see a FEMALE taxidermist. Owner of Bunny Lace Taxidermy, Meghan Cunningham (38) from Mississippi, USA, once worked in the beauty industry but after seeing a taxidermy tutorial she became more interested in creating looks for animals rather than people. In 2012, while at beauty school, Meghan saw a tutorial for taxidermy, and she became intrigued by the art. However, Meghan wanted to find ways to ethically source her animals because she didn???t want animals to die for her hobby. Having always had a creative background, the appeal of taxidermy lay in the sculpting opportunities. So, Meghan left beauty school and began sourcing dead wildlife to begin her new hobby. The first dead animals Meghan found were roadkill, which she still uses frequently. Meghan???s home, which she shares with her husband Bryan, is located near a farm and any casualties are donated to her. Unlike traditional taxidermists, Meghan doesn???t mount trophy animals, preferring to mount rabbits, squirrels, house cats, possums and bobcats. Meghan estimates that she has mounted over 700 animals, with each one taking approximately two-and-a-half weeks to complete. Through her work, Meghan tries to honour the life of every animal she transforms and to bring happiness to it by creating colourful sets and costumes. mediadrumworld.com / Meghan Cunningham
EN_01373506_0010 MDR
MISSISSIPPI, USA: THIS BEAUTY SCHOOL DROPOUT who preferred to work on DEAD ANIMALS than live people became an ethical taxidermist, but she admits that people are still surprised to see a FEMALE taxidermist. Owner of Bunny Lace Taxidermy, Meghan Cunningham (38) from Mississippi, USA, once worked in the beauty industry but after seeing a taxidermy tutorial she became more interested in creating looks for animals rather than people. In 2012, while at beauty school, Meghan saw a tutorial for taxidermy, and she became intrigued by the art. However, Meghan wanted to find ways to ethically source her animals because she didn???t want animals to die for her hobby. Having always had a creative background, the appeal of taxidermy lay in the sculpting opportunities. So, Meghan left beauty school and began sourcing dead wildlife to begin her new hobby. The first dead animals Meghan found were roadkill, which she still uses frequently. Meghan???s home, which she shares with her husband Bryan, is located near a farm and any casualties are donated to her. Unlike traditional taxidermists, Meghan doesn???t mount trophy animals, preferring to mount rabbits, squirrels, house cats, possums and bobcats. Meghan estimates that she has mounted over 700 animals, with each one taking approximately two-and-a-half weeks to complete. Through her work, Meghan tries to honour the life of every animal she transforms and to bring happiness to it by creating colourful sets and costumes. mediadrumworld.com / Meghan Cunningham
FBMD2300096901000040500000106400003c7a000029f00000174c0100867201006ae40100ba3802008a760200
EN_01373506_0011 MDR
A squirrel appearing to lift weights. MISSISSIPPI, USA: THIS BEAUTY SCHOOL DROPOUT who preferred to work on DEAD ANIMALS than live people became an ethical taxidermist, but she admits that people are still surprised to see a FEMALE taxidermist. Owner of Bunny Lace Taxidermy, Meghan Cunningham (38) from Mississippi, USA, once worked in the beauty industry but after seeing a taxidermy tutorial she became more interested in creating looks for animals rather than people. In 2012, while at beauty school, Meghan saw a tutorial for taxidermy, and she became intrigued by the art. However, Meghan wanted to find ways to ethically source her animals because she didn???t want animals to die for her hobby. Having always had a creative background, the appeal of taxidermy lay in the sculpting opportunities. So, Meghan left beauty school and began sourcing dead wildlife to begin her new hobby. The first dead animals Meghan found were roadkill, which she still uses frequently. Meghan???s home, which she shares with her husband Bryan, is located near a farm and any casualties are donated to her. Unlike traditional taxidermists, Meghan doesn???t mount trophy animals, preferring to mount rabbits, squirrels, house cats, possums and bobcats. Meghan estimates that she has mounted over 700 animals, with each one taking approximately two-and-a-half weeks to complete. Through her work, Meghan tries to honour the life of every animal she transforms and to bring happiness to it by creating colourful sets and costumes. mediadrumworld.com / Meghan Cunningham
FBMD0f000779030000936a0000d64c0100dc680100c3900100aa1802001fb802004ac00200
EN_01373506_0012 MDR
Meghan created a mysterious jackalope. MISSISSIPPI, USA: THIS BEAUTY SCHOOL DROPOUT who preferred to work on DEAD ANIMALS than live people became an ethical taxidermist, but she admits that people are still surprised to see a FEMALE taxidermist. Owner of Bunny Lace Taxidermy, Meghan Cunningham (38) from Mississippi, USA, once worked in the beauty industry but after seeing a taxidermy tutorial she became more interested in creating looks for animals rather than people. In 2012, while at beauty school, Meghan saw a tutorial for taxidermy, and she became intrigued by the art. However, Meghan wanted to find ways to ethically source her animals because she didn???t want animals to die for her hobby. Having always had a creative background, the appeal of taxidermy lay in the sculpting opportunities. So, Meghan left beauty school and began sourcing dead wildlife to begin her new hobby. The first dead animals Meghan found were roadkill, which she still uses frequently. Meghan???s home, which she shares with her husband Bryan, is located near a farm and any casualties are donated to her. Unlike traditional taxidermists, Meghan doesn???t mount trophy animals, preferring to mount rabbits, squirrels, house cats, possums and bobcats. Meghan estimates that she has mounted over 700 animals, with each one taking approximately two-and-a-half weeks to complete. Through her work, Meghan tries to honour the life of every animal she transforms and to bring happiness to it by creating colourful sets and costumes. mediadrumworld.com / Meghan Cunningham
FBMD23000968010000e9520000117300003391000099e70100eb5e0200c82703004d9b03005e1304002f4b0500
EN_01373506_0013 MDR
Meghan creating one of her projects. MISSISSIPPI, USA: THIS BEAUTY SCHOOL DROPOUT who preferred to work on DEAD ANIMALS than live people became an ethical taxidermist, but she admits that people are still surprised to see a FEMALE taxidermist. Owner of Bunny Lace Taxidermy, Meghan Cunningham (38) from Mississippi, USA, once worked in the beauty industry but after seeing a taxidermy tutorial she became more interested in creating looks for animals rather than people. In 2012, while at beauty school, Meghan saw a tutorial for taxidermy, and she became intrigued by the art. However, Meghan wanted to find ways to ethically source her animals because she didn???t want animals to die for her hobby. Having always had a creative background, the appeal of taxidermy lay in the sculpting opportunities. So, Meghan left beauty school and began sourcing dead wildlife to begin her new hobby. The first dead animals Meghan found were roadkill, which she still uses frequently. Meghan???s home, which she shares with her husband Bryan, is located near a farm and any casualties are donated to her. Unlike traditional taxidermists, Meghan doesn???t mount trophy animals, preferring to mount rabbits, squirrels, house cats, possums and bobcats. Meghan estimates that she has mounted over 700 animals, with each one taking approximately two-and-a-half weeks to complete. Through her work, Meghan tries to honour the life of every animal she transforms and to bring happiness to it by creating colourful sets and costumes. mediadrumworld.com / Meghan Cunningham
EN_01373506_0014 MDR
Meghan creating one of her projects. MISSISSIPPI, USA: THIS BEAUTY SCHOOL DROPOUT who preferred to work on DEAD ANIMALS than live people became an ethical taxidermist, but she admits that people are still surprised to see a FEMALE taxidermist. Owner of Bunny Lace Taxidermy, Meghan Cunningham (38) from Mississippi, USA, once worked in the beauty industry but after seeing a taxidermy tutorial she became more interested in creating looks for animals rather than people. In 2012, while at beauty school, Meghan saw a tutorial for taxidermy, and she became intrigued by the art. However, Meghan wanted to find ways to ethically source her animals because she didn???t want animals to die for her hobby. Having always had a creative background, the appeal of taxidermy lay in the sculpting opportunities. So, Meghan left beauty school and began sourcing dead wildlife to begin her new hobby. The first dead animals Meghan found were roadkill, which she still uses frequently. Meghan???s home, which she shares with her husband Bryan, is located near a farm and any casualties are donated to her. Unlike traditional taxidermists, Meghan doesn???t mount trophy animals, preferring to mount rabbits, squirrels, house cats, possums and bobcats. Meghan estimates that she has mounted over 700 animals, with each one taking approximately two-and-a-half weeks to complete. Through her work, Meghan tries to honour the life of every animal she transforms and to bring happiness to it by creating colourful sets and costumes. mediadrumworld.com / Meghan Cunningham
EN_01373506_0015 MDR
Meghan creating one of her projects. MISSISSIPPI, USA: THIS BEAUTY SCHOOL DROPOUT who preferred to work on DEAD ANIMALS than live people became an ethical taxidermist, but she admits that people are still surprised to see a FEMALE taxidermist. Owner of Bunny Lace Taxidermy, Meghan Cunningham (38) from Mississippi, USA, once worked in the beauty industry but after seeing a taxidermy tutorial she became more interested in creating looks for animals rather than people. In 2012, while at beauty school, Meghan saw a tutorial for taxidermy, and she became intrigued by the art. However, Meghan wanted to find ways to ethically source her animals because she didn???t want animals to die for her hobby. Having always had a creative background, the appeal of taxidermy lay in the sculpting opportunities. So, Meghan left beauty school and began sourcing dead wildlife to begin her new hobby. The first dead animals Meghan found were roadkill, which she still uses frequently. Meghan???s home, which she shares with her husband Bryan, is located near a farm and any casualties are donated to her. Unlike traditional taxidermists, Meghan doesn???t mount trophy animals, preferring to mount rabbits, squirrels, house cats, possums and bobcats. Meghan estimates that she has mounted over 700 animals, with each one taking approximately two-and-a-half weeks to complete. Through her work, Meghan tries to honour the life of every animal she transforms and to bring happiness to it by creating colourful sets and costumes. mediadrumworld.com / Meghan Cunningham
EN_01373506_0016 MDR
A dead bobcat on a set beside a piano. MISSISSIPPI, USA: THIS BEAUTY SCHOOL DROPOUT who preferred to work on DEAD ANIMALS than live people became an ethical taxidermist, but she admits that people are still surprised to see a FEMALE taxidermist. Owner of Bunny Lace Taxidermy, Meghan Cunningham (38) from Mississippi, USA, once worked in the beauty industry but after seeing a taxidermy tutorial she became more interested in creating looks for animals rather than people. In 2012, while at beauty school, Meghan saw a tutorial for taxidermy, and she became intrigued by the art. However, Meghan wanted to find ways to ethically source her animals because she didn???t want animals to die for her hobby. Having always had a creative background, the appeal of taxidermy lay in the sculpting opportunities. So, Meghan left beauty school and began sourcing dead wildlife to begin her new hobby. The first dead animals Meghan found were roadkill, which she still uses frequently. Meghan???s home, which she shares with her husband Bryan, is located near a farm and any casualties are donated to her. Unlike traditional taxidermists, Meghan doesn???t mount trophy animals, preferring to mount rabbits, squirrels, house cats, possums and bobcats. Meghan estimates that she has mounted over 700 animals, with each one taking approximately two-and-a-half weeks to complete. Through her work, Meghan tries to honour the life of every animal she transforms and to bring happiness to it by creating colourful sets and costumes. mediadrumworld.com / Meghan Cunningham
Rocznice 2018 Na wyłączność