zamknij [x]
do:

Radovan Karadźić skazany na dożywocie (44)

EN_01368675_0001 AP
A woman holds a photo of her son, a victim of the Srebrenica genocide, as she awaits the decision of the UN appeals judges on former Bosnian Serb leader Radovan Karadzic in Potocari, Bosnia and Herzegovina, Wednesday, March 20, 2019. United Nations appeals judges on Wednesday upheld the convictions of Karadzic for genocide, war crimes and crimes against humanity, and increased his sentence from 40 years to life imprisonment. (AP Photo/Marko Drobnjakovic), APTOPIX
EN_01368258_1812 AP
Women with the Mothers of Srebrenica hold banners outside the building which houses the International Residual Mechanism for Criminal Tribunals in The Hague, Netherlands, Wednesday, March 20, 2019. Nearly a quarter of a century since Bosnia's devastating war ended, former Bosnian Serb leader Radovan Karadzic is set to hear the final judgment on whether he can be held criminally responsible for unleashing a wave of murder and destruction. United Nations appeals judges will on Wednesday rule whether to uphold or overturn Karadzic's 2016 convictions for genocide, crimes against humanity and war crimes, as well as his 40-year sentence. (AP Photo/Peter Dejong)
AP POOL PHOTO
EN_01368258_1857 AP
Munira Subasic of the Mothers of Srebrenica, center right with white hair, and other protestors hold a banner outside the building which houses the International Residual Mechanism for Criminal Tribunals in The Hague, Netherlands, Wednesday, March 20, 2019. Nearly a quarter of a century since Bosnia's devastating war ended, former Bosnian Serb leader Radovan Karadzic is set to hear the final judgment on whether he can be held criminally responsible for unleashing a wave of murder and destruction. United Nations appeals judges will on Wednesday rule whether to uphold or overturn Karadzic's 2016 convictions for genocide, crimes against humanity and war crimes, as well as his 40-year sentence. (AP Photo/Peter Dejong)
AP POOL PHOTO
EN_01368258_1897 AP
Mothers of Srebrenica hold pictures of exhumed bodies from mass graves and pictures of former Bosnian Serb leader Radovan Karadzic outside the building which houses the International Residual Mechanism for Criminal Tribunals in The Hague, Netherlands, Wednesday, March 20, 2019. Nearly a quarter of a century since Bosnia's devastating war ended, Karadzic is set to hear the final judgment on whether he can be held criminally responsible for unleashing a wave of murder and destruction. United Nations appeals judges will on Wednesday rule whether to uphold or overturn Karadzic's 2016 convictions for genocide, crimes against humanity and war crimes, as well as his 40-year sentence. (AP Photo/Peter Dejong)
AP POOL PHOTO
EN_01368258_2019 AP
Pictures of war dead and missing persons are seen as demonstrators and journalists gather outside the building which houses the International Residual Mechanism for Criminal Tribunals prior to the appeals judgment of former Bosnian Serb leader Radovan Karadzic in The Hague, Netherlands, Wednesday, March 20, 2019. Nearly a quarter of a century since Bosnia's devastating war ended, Karadzic is set to hear the final judgment on whether he can be held criminally responsible for unleashing a wave of murder and destruction. United Nations appeals judges will on Wednesday rule whether to uphold or overturn Karadzic's 2016 convictions for genocide, crimes against humanity and war crimes, as well as his 40-year sentence. (AP Photo/Peter Dejong)
EN_01368258_2055 AP
Fikret Abdic holds the Time Magazine cover he's featured on when he was imprisoned in a Serb-run camp in Bosnia during the war, outside the building which houses the International Residual Mechanism for Criminal Tribunals prior to the appeals judgment of former Bosnian Serb leader Radovan Karadzic in The Hague, Netherlands, Wednesday, March 20, 2019. Nearly a quarter of a century since Bosnia's devastating war ended, Karadzic is set to hear the final judgment on whether he can be held criminally responsible for unleashing a wave of murder and destruction. United Nations appeals judges will on Wednesday rule whether to uphold or overturn Karadzic's 2016 convictions for genocide, crimes against humanity and war crimes, as well as his 40-year sentence. (AP Photo/Peter Dejong)
EN_01368258_2194 AP
Former Bosnian Serb leader Radovan Karadzic, right, enters the court room of the International Residual Mechanism for Criminal Tribunals in The Hague, Netherlands, Wednesday, March 20, 2019. Nearly a quarter of a century since Bosnia's devastating war ended, Karadzic is set to hear the final judgment on whether he can be held criminally responsible for unleashing a wave of murder and destruction. United Nations appeals judges will on Wednesday rule whether to uphold or overturn Karadzic's 2016 convictions for genocide, crimes against humanity and war crimes, as well as his 40-year sentence. (AP Photo/Peter Dejong, Pool)
AP POOL PHOTO
EN_01368258_2221 AP
Former Bosnian Serb leader Radovan Karadzic enters the court room of the International Residual Mechanism for Criminal Tribunals in The Hague, Netherlands, Wednesday, March 20, 2019. Nearly a quarter of a century since Bosnia's devastating war ended, Karadzic is set to hear the final judgment on whether he can be held criminally responsible for unleashing a wave of murder and destruction. United Nations appeals judges will on Wednesday rule whether to uphold or overturn Karadzic's 2016 convictions for genocide, crimes against humanity and war crimes, as well as his 40-year sentence. (AP Photo/Peter Dejong, Pool)
AP POOL PHOTO
EN_01368258_2223 AP
APTOPIX Former Bosnian Serb leader Radovan Karadzic enters the court room of the International Residual Mechanism for Criminal Tribunals in The Hague, Netherlands, Wednesday, March 20, 2019. Nearly a quarter of a century since Bosnia's devastating war ended, Karadzic is set to hear the final judgment on whether he can be held criminally responsible for unleashing a wave of murder and destruction. United Nations appeals judges will on Wednesday rule whether to uphold or overturn Karadzic's 2016 convictions for genocide, crimes against humanity and war crimes, as well as his 40-year sentence. (AP Photo/Peter Dejong, Pool)
AP POOL PHOTO
EN_01368258_2227 AP
Former Bosnian Serb leader Radovan Karadzic enters the court room of the International Residual Mechanism for Criminal Tribunals in The Hague, Netherlands, Wednesday, March 20, 2019. Nearly a quarter of a century since Bosnia's devastating war ended, Karadzic is set to hear the final judgment on whether he can be held criminally responsible for unleashing a wave of murder and destruction. United Nations appeals judges will on Wednesday rule whether to uphold or overturn Karadzic's 2016 convictions for genocide, crimes against humanity and war crimes, as well as his 40-year sentence. (AP Photo/Peter Dejong, Pool)
AP POOL PHOTO
EN_01368258_2231 AP
Toys and other belongings of children who were killed in the 1990s war in Bosnia are displayed as their parents wait for broadcast of the verdict for Bosnian Serb leader Radovan Karadzic, in Sarajevo, Bosnia-Herzegovina, Wednesday, March 20, 2019. A hearing is underway at a United Nations court where judges will hand down their decisions in the appeal by former Bosnian Serb leader Radovan Karadzic against his convictions and 40-year sentence for masterminding atrocities in his country's devastating 1992-95 war. The judges are also set to rule on whether Karadzic should have been acquitted of a second count of genocide. (AP Photo/Darko Bandic)
EN_01368258_2232 AP
Toys and other belongings of children who were killed in the 1990s war in Bosnia are displayed as their parents wait for broadcast of the verdict for Bosnian Serb leader Radovan Karadzic, in Sarajevo, Bosnia-Herzegovina, Wednesday, March 20, 2019. A hearing is underway at a United Nations court where judges will hand down their decisions in the appeal by former Bosnian Serb leader Radovan Karadzic against his convictions and 40-year sentence for masterminding atrocities in his country's devastating 1992-95 war. The judges are also set to rule on whether Karadzic should have been acquitted of a second count of genocide. (AP Photo/Darko Bandic)
EN_01368258_2236 AP
Toys and other belongings of children who were killed in the 1990s war in Bosnia are displayed as their parents wait for broadcast of the verdict for Bosnian Serb leader Radovan Karadzic, in Sarajevo, Bosnia-Herzegovina, Wednesday, March 20, 2019. A hearing is underway at a United Nations court where judges will hand down their decisions in the appeal by former Bosnian Serb leader Radovan Karadzic against his convictions and 40-year sentence for masterminding atrocities in his country's devastating 1992-95 war. The judges are also set to rule on whether Karadzic should have been acquitted of a second count of genocide. (AP Photo/Darko Bandic)
EN_01368258_2244 AP
Former Bosnian Serb leader Radovan Karadzic enters the court room of the International Residual Mechanism for Criminal Tribunals in The Hague, Netherlands, Wednesday, March 20, 2019. Nearly a quarter of a century since Bosnia's devastating war ended, Karadzic is set to hear the final judgment on whether he can be held criminally responsible for unleashing a wave of murder and destruction. United Nations appeals judges will on Wednesday rule whether to uphold or overturn Karadzic's 2016 convictions for genocide, crimes against humanity and war crimes, as well as his 40-year sentence. (AP Photo/Peter Dejong, Pool)
AP POOL PHOTO
EN_01368258_2245 AP
Former Bosnian Serb leader Radovan Karadzic enters the court room of the International Residual Mechanism for Criminal Tribunals in The Hague, Netherlands, Wednesday, March 20, 2019. Nearly a quarter of a century since Bosnia's devastating war ended, Karadzic is set to hear the final judgment on whether he can be held criminally responsible for unleashing a wave of murder and destruction. United Nations appeals judges will on Wednesday rule whether to uphold or overturn Karadzic's 2016 convictions for genocide, crimes against humanity and war crimes, as well as his 40-year sentence. (AP Photo/Peter Dejong, Pool)
AP POOL PHOTO
EN_01368258_2252 AP
Former Bosnian Serb leader Radovan Karadzic, second left, rear, rises as judges with Presiding judge Vagn Joensen of Denmark, right, enter the court room of the International Residual Mechanism for Criminal Tribunals in The Hague, Netherlands, Wednesday, March 20, 2019. Nearly a quarter of a century since Bosnia's devastating war ended, Karadzic is set to hear the final judgment on whether he can be held criminally responsible for unleashing a wave of murder and destruction. United Nations appeals judges will on Wednesday rule whether to uphold or overturn Karadzic's 2016 convictions for genocide, crimes against humanity and war crimes, as well as his 40-year sentence. (AP Photo/Peter Dejong, Pool)
AP POOL PHOTO / EDS NOTE PICTURE TAKEN THROUGH GLASS SEPERATION
EN_01368258_2264 AP
Presiding judge Vagn Joensen of Denmark, center, enter the court room of the International Residual Mechanism for Criminal Tribunals to read the verdict in the appeals case of former Bosnian Serb leader Radovan Karadzic in The Hague, Netherlands, Wednesday, March 20, 2019. Nearly a quarter of a century since Bosnia's devastating war ended, Karadzic is set to hear the final judgment on whether he can be held criminally responsible for unleashing a wave of murder and destruction. United Nations appeals judges will on Wednesday rule whether to uphold or overturn Karadzic's 2016 convictions for genocide, crimes against humanity and war crimes, as well as his 40-year sentence. (AP Photo/Peter Dejong, Pool)
AP POOL PHOTO / EDS NOTE PICTURE TAKEN THROUGH GLASS SEPERATION
EN_01368258_2268 AP
Former Bosnian Serb leader Radovan Karadzic enters the court room of the International Residual Mechanism for Criminal Tribunals in The Hague, Netherlands, Wednesday, March 20, 2019. Nearly a quarter of a century since Bosnia's devastating war ended, Karadzic is set to hear the final judgment on whether he can be held criminally responsible for unleashing a wave of murder and destruction. United Nations appeals judges will on Wednesday rule whether to uphold or overturn Karadzic's 2016 convictions for genocide, crimes against humanity and war crimes, as well as his 40-year sentence. (AP Photo/Peter Dejong, Pool)
AP POOL PHOTO
EN_01368258_2270 AP
Former Bosnian Serb leader Radovan Karadzic enters the court room of the International Residual Mechanism for Criminal Tribunals in The Hague, Netherlands, Wednesday, March 20, 2019. Nearly a quarter of a century since Bosnia's devastating war ended, Karadzic is set to hear the final judgment on whether he can be held criminally responsible for unleashing a wave of murder and destruction. United Nations appeals judges will on Wednesday rule whether to uphold or overturn Karadzic's 2016 convictions for genocide, crimes against humanity and war crimes, as well as his 40-year sentence. (AP Photo/Peter Dejong, Pool)
AP POOL PHOTO
EN_01368258_2274 AP
Former Bosnian Serb leader Radovan Karadzic enters the court room of the International Residual Mechanism for Criminal Tribunals in The Hague, Netherlands, Wednesday, March 20, 2019. Nearly a quarter of a century since Bosnia's devastating war ended, Karadzic is set to hear the final judgment on whether he can be held criminally responsible for unleashing a wave of murder and destruction. United Nations appeals judges will on Wednesday rule whether to uphold or overturn Karadzic's 2016 convictions for genocide, crimes against humanity and war crimes, as well as his 40-year sentence. (AP Photo/Peter Dejong, Pool)
AP POOL PHOTO
EN_01368258_2280 AP
APTOPIX Former Bosnian Serb leader Radovan Karadzic enters the court room of the International Residual Mechanism for Criminal Tribunals in The Hague, Netherlands, Wednesday, March 20, 2019. Nearly a quarter of a century since Bosnia's devastating war ended, Karadzic is set to hear the final judgment on whether he can be held criminally responsible for unleashing a wave of murder and destruction. United Nations appeals judges will on Wednesday rule whether to uphold or overturn Karadzic's 2016 convictions for genocide, crimes against humanity and war crimes, as well as his 40-year sentence. (AP Photo/Peter Dejong, Pool)
AP POOL PHOTO
EN_01368258_2282 AP
Former Bosnian Serb leader Radovan Karadzic enters the court room of the International Residual Mechanism for Criminal Tribunals in The Hague, Netherlands, Wednesday, March 20, 2019. Nearly a quarter of a century since Bosnia's devastating war ended, Karadzic is set to hear the final judgment on whether he can be held criminally responsible for unleashing a wave of murder and destruction. United Nations appeals judges will on Wednesday rule whether to uphold or overturn Karadzic's 2016 convictions for genocide, crimes against humanity and war crimes, as well as his 40-year sentence. (AP Photo/Peter Dejong, Pool)
AP POOL PHOTO
EN_01368258_2283 AP
Former Bosnian Serb leader Radovan Karadzic enters the court room of the International Residual Mechanism for Criminal Tribunals in The Hague, Netherlands, Wednesday, March 20, 2019. Nearly a quarter of a century since Bosnia's devastating war ended, Karadzic is set to hear the final judgment on whether he can be held criminally responsible for unleashing a wave of murder and destruction. United Nations appeals judges will on Wednesday rule whether to uphold or overturn Karadzic's 2016 convictions for genocide, crimes against humanity and war crimes, as well as his 40-year sentence. (AP Photo/Peter Dejong, Pool)
AP POOL PHOTO
EN_01368258_2371 AP
The crowd applaudes as U.N. court's conviction and sentencing of ex-Bosnian Serb leader Radovan Karadzic is broadcasted in the city hall in Sarajevo, Bosnia-Herzegovina, Wednesday, March 20, 2019. United Nations appeals judges have upheld the convictions of former Bosnian Serb leader Radovan Karadzic for genocide, war crimes and crimes against humanity and increased his sentence from 40 years to life imprisonment. (AP Photo/Darko Bandic)
EN_01368258_2375 AP
People gather at the Potocari memorial center for victims of the Srebrenica genocide, as they await the decision of the UN appeals judges on former Bosnian Serb leader Radovan Karadzic in Potocari, Bosnia and Herzegovina, Wednesday, March 20, 2019. United Nations appeals judges on Wednesday upheld the convictions of Karadzic for genocide, war crimes and crimes against humanity, and increased his sentence from 40 years to life imprisonment. (AP Photo/Marko Drobnjakovic)
EN_01368258_2380 AP
U.N. court's conviction and sentencing of ex-Bosnian Serb leader Radovan Karadzic is broadcasted in the city hall in Sarajevo, Bosnia-Herzegovina, Wednesday, March 20, 2019. United Nations appeals judges have upheld the convictions of former Bosnian Serb leader Radovan Karadzic for genocide, war crimes and crimes against humanity and increased his sentence from 40 years to life imprisonment. (AP Photo/Darko Bandic)
EN_01368258_2414 AP
A woman prays at the Potocari memorial center for victims of the Srebrenica genocide in Potocari, Bosnia and Herzegovina, Wednesday, March 20, 2019. United Nations appeals judges on Wednesday upheld the convictions of former Bosnian Serb leader Radovan Karadzic for genocide, war crimes and crimes against humanity, and increased his sentence from 40 years to life imprisonment. (AP Photo/Marko Drobnjakovic), APTOPIX
EN_01368258_2417 AP
A woman walks through the cemetery of the Potocari memorial center for victims of the Srebrenica genocide in Potocari, Bosnia and Herzegovina, Wednesday, March 20, 2019. United Nations appeals judges on Wednesday upheld the convictions of former Bosnian Serb leader Radovan Karadzic for genocide, war crimes and crimes against humanity, and increased his sentence from 40 years to life imprisonment. (AP Photo/Marko Drobnjakovic)
EN_01368258_2449 AP
A woman with the Mothers of Srebrenica, holds the photographs of two victims of the Bosnian war as she talks to Peter Robinson of the U.S., lawyer for former Bosnian Serb leader Radovan Karadzic, right, after the court upheld Karadzic's conviction at International Residual Mechanism for Criminal Tribunals in The Hague, Netherlands, Wednesday, March 20, 2019. Nearly a quarter of a century since Bosnia's devastating war ended, Karadzic heard the final judgment upholding 2016 convictions for genocide, crimes against humanity and war crimes, and an increase from his 40-year sentence to life. (AP Photo/Peter Dejongl)
EN_01368258_2450 AP
Fikret Abdic holds the Time Magazine cover he's featured on when he was imprisoned in a Serb-run camp in Bosnia during the war, after the court upheld Karadzic's conviction at International Residual Mechanism for Criminal Tribunals, rear, in The Hague, Netherlands, Wednesday, March 20, 2019. Nearly a quarter of a century since Bosnia's devastating war ended, Karadzic heard the final judgment upholding 2016 convictions for genocide, crimes against humanity and war crimes, and an increase from his 40-year sentence to life. (AP Photo/Peter Dejongl)
EN_01368258_2549 AP
Former Bosnian Serb leader Radovan Karadzic enters the court room of the International Residual Mechanism for Criminal Tribunals in The Hague, Netherlands, Wednesday, March 20, 2019. Nearly a quarter of a century since Bosnia's devastating war ended, Karadzic is set to hear the final judgment on whether he can be held criminally responsible for unleashing a wave of murder and destruction. United Nations appeals judges will on Wednesday rule whether to uphold or overturn Karadzic's 2016 convictions for genocide, crimes against humanity and war crimes, as well as his 40-year sentence. (AP Photo/Peter Dejong, Pool), APTOPIX
AP POOL PHOTO
EN_01368255_1310 AFP
Former Bosnian Serb leader Radovan Karadzic arrives at the court room of the International Residual Mechanism for Criminal Tribunals in The Hague, Netherlands, on March 20, 2019 to hear the final judgement on his role in the bloody conflict that tore his country apart a quarter of a century ago. - Karadzic was notorious for his role in the 1995 Srebrenica massacre where more than 8,000 Muslim men and boys were slaughtered in the worst bloodletting on European soil since World War II. In one of the last remaining cases from the break-up of Yugoslavia, UN judges in The Hague will rule on his appeal against his 2016 conviction for genocide and war crimes, and his 40-year jail sentence. (Photo by Peter Dejong / POOL / AFP)
EN_01368255_1323 AFP
Former Bosnian Serb leader Radovan Karadzic arrives at the court room of the International Residual Mechanism for Criminal Tribunals in The Hague, Netherlands, on March 20, 2019 to hear the final judgement on his role in the bloody conflict that tore his country apart a quarter of a century ago. - Karadzic was notorious for his role in the 1995 Srebrenica massacre where more than 8,000 Muslim men and boys were slaughtered in the worst bloodletting on European soil since World War II. In one of the last remaining cases from the break-up of Yugoslavia, UN judges in The Hague will rule on his appeal against his 2016 conviction for genocide and war crimes, and his 40-year jail sentence. (Photo by Peter Dejong / various sources / AFP)
EN_01368255_1327 AFP
Former Bosnian Serb leader Radovan Karadzic arrives at the court room of the International Residual Mechanism for Criminal Tribunals in The Hague, Netherlands, on March 20, 2019 to hear the final judgement on his role in the bloody conflict that tore his country apart a quarter of a century ago. - Karadzic was notorious for his role in the 1995 Srebrenica massacre where more than 8,000 Muslim men and boys were slaughtered in the worst bloodletting on European soil since World War II. In one of the last remaining cases from the break-up of Yugoslavia, UN judges in The Hague will rule on his appeal against his 2016 conviction for genocide and war crimes, and his 40-year jail sentence. (Photo by Peter Dejong / POOL / AFP)
EN_01368255_1330 AFP
Former Bosnian Serb leader Radovan Karadzic arrives at the court room of the International Residual Mechanism for Criminal Tribunals in The Hague, Netherlands, on March 20, 2019 to hear the final judgement on his role in the bloody conflict that tore his country apart a quarter of a century ago. - Karadzic was notorious for his role in the 1995 Srebrenica massacre where more than 8,000 Muslim men and boys were slaughtered in the worst bloodletting on European soil since World War II. In one of the last remaining cases from the break-up of Yugoslavia, UN judges in The Hague will rule on his appeal against his 2016 conviction for genocide and war crimes, and his 40-year jail sentence. (Photo by Peter Dejong / various sources / AFP)
EN_01368255_1336 AFP
Former Bosnian Serb leader Radovan Karadzic looks on as he arrives at the court room of the International Residual Mechanism for Criminal Tribunals in The Hague, Netherlands, on March 20, 2019 to hear the final judgement on his role in the bloody conflict that tore his country apart a quarter of a century ago. - Karadzic was notorious for his role in the 1995 Srebrenica massacre where more than 8,000 Muslim men and boys were slaughtered in the worst bloodletting on European soil since World War II. In one of the last remaining cases from the break-up of Yugoslavia, UN judges in The Hague will rule on his appeal against his 2016 conviction for genocide and war crimes, and his 40-year jail sentence. (Photo by Peter Dejong / POOL / AFP)
EN_01368255_1349 AFP
Former Bosnian Serb leader Radovan Karadzic sits in the court room of the International Residual Mechanism for Criminal Tribunals in The Hague, Netherlands, on March 20, 2019 as he waits to hear the final judgement on his role in the bloody conflict that tore his country apart a quarter of a century ago. - Karadzic was notorious for his role in the 1995 Srebrenica massacre where more than 8,000 Muslim men and boys were slaughtered in the worst bloodletting on European soil since World War II. In one of the last remaining cases from the break-up of Yugoslavia, UN judges in The Hague will rule on his appeal against his 2016 conviction for genocide and war crimes, and his 40-year jail sentence. (Photo by Peter Dejong / POOL / AFP)
EN_01368255_1354 AFP
Former Bosnian Serb leader Radovan Karadzic sits in the court room of the International Residual Mechanism for Criminal Tribunals in The Hague, Netherlands, on March 20, 2019 as he waits to hear the final judgement on his role in the bloody conflict that tore his country apart a quarter of a century ago. - Karadzic was notorious for his role in the 1995 Srebrenica massacre where more than 8,000 Muslim men and boys were slaughtered in the worst bloodletting on European soil since World War II. In one of the last remaining cases from the break-up of Yugoslavia, UN judges in The Hague will rule on his appeal against his 2016 conviction for genocide and war crimes, and his 40-year jail sentence. (Photo by Peter Dejong / POOL / AFP)
EN_01368255_1369 AFP
Former Bosnian Serb leader Radovan Karadzic reacts at the court room of the International Residual Mechanism for Criminal Tribunals in The Hague, Netherlands, on March 20, 2019, while waiting to hear the final judgement on his role in the bloody conflict that tore his country apart a quarter of a century ago. - Karadzic was notorious for his role in the 1995 Srebrenica massacre where more than 8,000 Muslim men and boys were slaughtered in the worst bloodletting on European soil since World War II. In one of the last remaining cases from the break-up of Yugoslavia, UN judges in The Hague will rule on his appeal against his 2016 conviction for genocide and war crimes, and his 40-year jail sentence. (Photo by Peter Dejong / various sources / AFP)
EN_01368255_1686 AFP
Bosnian Muslim woman, Bida Osmanovic, survivor of the Srebrenica 1995 massacre, cries at the Srebrenica memorial in Potocari on March 20, 2019, while watching the live television broadcast of the final sentence handed down in the case of Bosnian Serb wartime leader Radovan Karadzic before the Mechanism for International Criminal Tribunals (MTPI) in The Hague. - Former Bosnian Serb leader Radovan Karadzic will spend the rest of his life in jail for the "sheer scale and systematic cruelty" of his crimes in the war that tore his country apart a quarter of a century ago, UN judges said on March 20, 2019. Grim-faced and silent, the 73-year-old stood in the dock as judges in The Hague said they had upheld his 2016 convictions for genocide in the Srebrenica massacre and war crimes throughout the 1990s. (Photo by ELVIS BARUKCIC / AFP)
EN_01368255_1692 AFP
Bosnian Muslim woman, Suhra Malic, survivor of the Srebrenica 1995 massacre, cries as she shows photos of her slain sons at the Srebrenica memorial in Potocari on March 20, 2019, while watching the live television broadcast of the final sentence handed down in the case of Bosnian Serb wartime leader Radovan Karadzic before the Mechanism for International Criminal Tribunals (MTPI) in The Hague. - Former Bosnian Serb leader Radovan Karadzic will spend the rest of his life in jail for the "sheer scale and systematic cruelty" of his crimes in the war that tore his country apart a quarter of a century ago, UN judges said on March 20, 2019. Grim-faced and silent, the 73-year-old stood in the dock as judges in The Hague said they had upheld his 2016 convictions for genocide in the Srebrenica massacre and war crimes throughout the 1990s. (Photo by ELVIS BARUKCIC / AFP)
EN_01368255_1703 AFP
A Bosnian Muslim woman, survivor of the Srebrenica 1995 massacre, touches the tombstone of a relative at the Srebrenica memorial in Potocari, on March 20, 2019, on the day of the final sentence handed down in the case of Bosnian Serb wartime leader Radovan Karadzic before the Mechanism for International Criminal Tribunals (MTPI) in The Hague. - Former Bosnian Serb leader Radovan Karadzic will spend the rest of his life in jail for the "sheer scale and systematic cruelty" of his crimes in the war that tore his country apart a quarter of a century ago, UN judges said on March 20, 2019. Grim-faced and silent, the 73-year-old stood in the dock as judges in The Hague said they had upheld his 2016 convictions for genocide in the Srebrenica massacre and war crimes throughout the 1990s. (Photo by ELVIS BARUKCIC / AFP)
EN_01368038_1324 AP
In this Saturday, March 16, 2019 photo, a chaplet hangs on a tomb at the memorial cemetery for massacre victims in Potocari, near Srebrenica, Bosnia-Herzegovina. Nearly a quarter of a century since Bosnia's devastating war ended, former Bosnian Serb leader Radovan Karadzic is set to hear the final judgment on whether he can be held criminally responsible for unleashing a wave of murder and mistreatment by his administration's forces. United Nations appeals judges on Wednesday March 20, 2019 will decide whether to uphold or overturn Karadzic's 2016 convictions for genocide, crimes against humanity and war crimes and his 40-year sentence. (AP Photo/Darko Bandic)
EN_01367785_0749 AFP
(FILES) In this file photo taken on April 24, 2018 former Bosnian Serb leader Radovan Karadzic appears in a courtroom before the United Nations Mechanism for International Criminal Tribunals (MICT), in The Hague, on the second day of his appeal hearing after he was jailed for 40 years for war crimes and genocide. - As Brenton Tarrant drove to the two New Zealand mosques where he carried out his mass killings, a Serb nationalist song was heard playing in the background of the haunting video he broadcast live on Facebook. The mass shooter's weapons also bore the names of several historical Serb nationalist figures, revealing an unexpected interest in Balkan conflicts that stirred bad blood in a region fractured by war. It was a "Serbian nationalist song in which the name of Radovan Karadzic is mentioned and called on to lead Serbs", he said, referring the convicted war criminal who led Bosnia's Serbs during the 1992-95 war. (Photo by Yves Herman / POOL / AFP)
TO GO WITH AFP STORY by Jovan MATIC and Nicolas GAUDICHET
Rocznice 2018 Na wyłączność