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NASA testuje ludzi przed misją na Marsa (9)

EN_01363287_0004 COV
ARCHIVE PICTURE SHOWS: Some of the study will be conducted at NASA's Human Exploration Research Analog (HERA) in the Johnson Space Center in Houston. This archive picture shows four HERA crew members ....... STORY COPY: Researchers are locking astronauts up for long stretches - to see if they can get on with each other on a mission to Mars. While scientists are working on the technology to physically transport humans to other planets, the ability of people to get on in close confinement will be vital to mission success. As detailed by a new report (17 Feb), Northwestern University researchers are developing a predictive model to help NASA anticipate conflicts and communication breakdowns among crew members and head off problems that could make or break the Mission to Mars. The researchers have been culling data from the Human Experimentation Research Analog (HERA) at Houston's Johnson Space Center. HERA's capsule simulator houses astronauts for up to 45 days; a mock mission control outside the capsule augments the realism with sound effects, vibrations and communication delays. Those on the inside undergo sleep deprivation and try to perform tasks. The researchers collect moment-to-moment metrics about individual performance, moods, psychosocial adaptation and more. NASA has formalised plans to send a crewed spacecraft to Mars, a journey that could involve 250 million miles of travel. Among the worldwide teams of researchers toiling over the journey's inherent physiological, engineering and social obstacles, Northwestern professors Noshir Contractor and Leslie DeChurch, and their collaborators, are charting a new course with a series of projects focused on the insights from the science of teams and networks. In a multiphase study conducted in two analog environments -- HERA in the Johnson Space Center in Houston and the SIRIUS mission in the NEK analog located in the Institute for Bio-Medical Problems (IBMP) in Russia -- scientists are studying the behav
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EN_01363287_0001 COV
ARCHIVE PICTURE SHOWS: Some of the study will be conducted at NASA's Human Exploration Research Analog (HERA) in the Johnson Space Center in Houston. This archive picture shows four HERA crew members before they enter the habitat for a 2-week simulation. ....... STORY COPY: Researchers are locking astronauts up for long stretches - to see if they can get on with each other on a mission to Mars. While scientists are working on the technology to physically transport humans to other planets, the ability of people to get on in close confinement will be vital to mission success. As detailed by a new report (17 Feb), Northwestern University researchers are developing a predictive model to help NASA anticipate conflicts and communication breakdowns among crew members and head off problems that could make or break the Mission to Mars. The researchers have been culling data from the Human Experimentation Research Analog (HERA) at Houston's Johnson Space Center. HERA's capsule simulator houses astronauts for up to 45 days; a mock mission control outside the capsule augments the realism with sound effects, vibrations and communication delays. Those on the inside undergo sleep deprivation and try to perform tasks. The researchers collect moment-to-moment metrics about individual performance, moods, psychosocial adaptation and more. NASA has formalised plans to send a crewed spacecraft to Mars, a journey that could involve 250 million miles of travel. Among the worldwide teams of researchers toiling over the journey's inherent physiological, engineering and social obstacles, Northwestern professors Noshir Contractor and Leslie DeChurch, and their collaborators, are charting a new course with a series of projects focused on the insights from the science of teams and networks. In a multiphase study conducted in two analog environments -- HERA in the Johnson Space Center in Houston and the SIRIUS mission in the NEK analog located in the Institute for Bio-Medical Problem
=Editorial use only
EN_01363287_0006 COV
ARCHIVE PICTURE SHOWS: Some of the study will be conducted at NASA's Human Exploration Research Analog (HERA) in the Johnson Space Center in Houston ....... STORY COPY: Researchers are locking astronauts up for long stretches - to see if they can get on with each other on a mission to Mars. While scientists are working on the technology to physically transport humans to other planets, the ability of people to get on in close confinement will be vital to mission success. As detailed by a new report (17 Feb), Northwestern University researchers are developing a predictive model to help NASA anticipate conflicts and communication breakdowns among crew members and head off problems that could make or break the Mission to Mars. The researchers have been culling data from the Human Experimentation Research Analog (HERA) at Houston's Johnson Space Center. HERA's capsule simulator houses astronauts for up to 45 days; a mock mission control outside the capsule augments the realism with sound effects, vibrations and communication delays. Those on the inside undergo sleep deprivation and try to perform tasks. The researchers collect moment-to-moment metrics about individual performance, moods, psychosocial adaptation and more. NASA has formalised plans to send a crewed spacecraft to Mars, a journey that could involve 250 million miles of travel. Among the worldwide teams of researchers toiling over the journey's inherent physiological, engineering and social obstacles, Northwestern professors Noshir Contractor and Leslie DeChurch, and their collaborators, are charting a new course with a series of projects focused on the insights from the science of teams and networks. In a multiphase study conducted in two analog environments -- HERA in the Johnson Space Center in Houston and the SIRIUS mission in the NEK analog located in the Institute for Bio-Medical Problems (IBMP) in Russia -- scientists are studying the behavior of analog astronaut crews on mock missions, com
=Editorial use only
EN_01363287_0002 COV
ARCHIVE PICTURE SHOWS: Some of the study will be conducted at NASA's Human Exploration Research Analog (HERA) in the Johnson Space Center in Houston ....... STORY COPY: Researchers are locking astronauts up for long stretches - to see if they can get on with each other on a mission to Mars. While scientists are working on the technology to physically transport humans to other planets, the ability of people to get on in close confinement will be vital to mission success. As detailed by a new report (17 Feb), Northwestern University researchers are developing a predictive model to help NASA anticipate conflicts and communication breakdowns among crew members and head off problems that could make or break the Mission to Mars. The researchers have been culling data from the Human Experimentation Research Analog (HERA) at Houston's Johnson Space Center. HERA's capsule simulator houses astronauts for up to 45 days; a mock mission control outside the capsule augments the realism with sound effects, vibrations and communication delays. Those on the inside undergo sleep deprivation and try to perform tasks. The researchers collect moment-to-moment metrics about individual performance, moods, psychosocial adaptation and more. NASA has formalised plans to send a crewed spacecraft to Mars, a journey that could involve 250 million miles of travel. Among the worldwide teams of researchers toiling over the journey's inherent physiological, engineering and social obstacles, Northwestern professors Noshir Contractor and Leslie DeChurch, and their collaborators, are charting a new course with a series of projects focused on the insights from the science of teams and networks. In a multiphase study conducted in two analog environments -- HERA in the Johnson Space Center in Houston and the SIRIUS mission in the NEK analog located in the Institute for Bio-Medical Problems (IBMP) in Russia -- scientists are studying the behavior of analog astronaut crews on mock missions, com
=Editorial use only
EN_01363287_0003 COV
ARCHIVE PICTURE SHOWS: Some of the study will be conducted at NASA's Human Exploration Research Analog (HERA) in the Johnson Space Center in Houston ....... STORY COPY: Researchers are locking astronauts up for long stretches - to see if they can get on with each other on a mission to Mars. While scientists are working on the technology to physically transport humans to other planets, the ability of people to get on in close confinement will be vital to mission success. As detailed by a new report (17 Feb), Northwestern University researchers are developing a predictive model to help NASA anticipate conflicts and communication breakdowns among crew members and head off problems that could make or break the Mission to Mars. The researchers have been culling data from the Human Experimentation Research Analog (HERA) at Houston's Johnson Space Center. HERA's capsule simulator houses astronauts for up to 45 days; a mock mission control outside the capsule augments the realism with sound effects, vibrations and communication delays. Those on the inside undergo sleep deprivation and try to perform tasks. The researchers collect moment-to-moment metrics about individual performance, moods, psychosocial adaptation and more. NASA has formalised plans to send a crewed spacecraft to Mars, a journey that could involve 250 million miles of travel. Among the worldwide teams of researchers toiling over the journey's inherent physiological, engineering and social obstacles, Northwestern professors Noshir Contractor and Leslie DeChurch, and their collaborators, are charting a new course with a series of projects focused on the insights from the science of teams and networks. In a multiphase study conducted in two analog environments -- HERA in the Johnson Space Center in Houston and the SIRIUS mission in the NEK analog located in the Institute for Bio-Medical Problems (IBMP) in Russia -- scientists are studying the behavior of analog astronaut crews on mock missions, com
=Editorial use only
EN_01363287_0005 COV
ARCHIVE PICTURE SHOWS: Some of the study will be conducted at NASA's Human Exploration Research Analog (HERA) in the Johnson Space Center in Houston ....... STORY COPY: Researchers are locking astronauts up for long stretches - to see if they can get on with each other on a mission to Mars. While scientists are working on the technology to physically transport humans to other planets, the ability of people to get on in close confinement will be vital to mission success. As detailed by a new report (17 Feb), Northwestern University researchers are developing a predictive model to help NASA anticipate conflicts and communication breakdowns among crew members and head off problems that could make or break the Mission to Mars. The researchers have been culling data from the Human Experimentation Research Analog (HERA) at Houston's Johnson Space Center. HERA's capsule simulator houses astronauts for up to 45 days; a mock mission control outside the capsule augments the realism with sound effects, vibrations and communication delays. Those on the inside undergo sleep deprivation and try to perform tasks. The researchers collect moment-to-moment metrics about individual performance, moods, psychosocial adaptation and more. NASA has formalised plans to send a crewed spacecraft to Mars, a journey that could involve 250 million miles of travel. Among the worldwide teams of researchers toiling over the journey's inherent physiological, engineering and social obstacles, Northwestern professors Noshir Contractor and Leslie DeChurch, and their collaborators, are charting a new course with a series of projects focused on the insights from the science of teams and networks. In a multiphase study conducted in two analog environments -- HERA in the Johnson Space Center in Houston and the SIRIUS mission in the NEK analog located in the Institute for Bio-Medical Problems (IBMP) in Russia -- scientists are studying the behavior of analog astronaut crews on mock missions, com
=Editorial use only
EN_01363287_0007 COV
ARCHIVE PICTURE SHOWS: Some of the study will be conducted at NASA's Human Exploration Research Analog (HERA) in the Johnson Space Center in Houston ....... STORY COPY: Researchers are locking astronauts up for long stretches - to see if they can get on with each other on a mission to Mars. While scientists are working on the technology to physically transport humans to other planets, the ability of people to get on in close confinement will be vital to mission success. As detailed by a new report (17 Feb), Northwestern University researchers are developing a predictive model to help NASA anticipate conflicts and communication breakdowns among crew members and head off problems that could make or break the Mission to Mars. The researchers have been culling data from the Human Experimentation Research Analog (HERA) at Houston's Johnson Space Center. HERA's capsule simulator houses astronauts for up to 45 days; a mock mission control outside the capsule augments the realism with sound effects, vibrations and communication delays. Those on the inside undergo sleep deprivation and try to perform tasks. The researchers collect moment-to-moment metrics about individual performance, moods, psychosocial adaptation and more. NASA has formalised plans to send a crewed spacecraft to Mars, a journey that could involve 250 million miles of travel. Among the worldwide teams of researchers toiling over the journey's inherent physiological, engineering and social obstacles, Northwestern professors Noshir Contractor and Leslie DeChurch, and their collaborators, are charting a new course with a series of projects focused on the insights from the science of teams and networks. In a multiphase study conducted in two analog environments -- HERA in the Johnson Space Center in Houston and the SIRIUS mission in the NEK analog located in the Institute for Bio-Medical Problems (IBMP) in Russia -- scientists are studying the behavior of analog astronaut crews on mock missions, com
=Editorial use only
EN_01363287_0008 COV
ARCHIVE PICTURE SHOWS: Some of the study will be conducted at NASA's Human Exploration Research Analog (HERA) in the Johnson Space Center in Houston ....... STORY COPY: Researchers are locking astronauts up for long stretches - to see if they can get on with each other on a mission to Mars. While scientists are working on the technology to physically transport humans to other planets, the ability of people to get on in close confinement will be vital to mission success. As detailed by a new report (17 Feb), Northwestern University researchers are developing a predictive model to help NASA anticipate conflicts and communication breakdowns among crew members and head off problems that could make or break the Mission to Mars. The researchers have been culling data from the Human Experimentation Research Analog (HERA) at Houston's Johnson Space Center. HERA's capsule simulator houses astronauts for up to 45 days; a mock mission control outside the capsule augments the realism with sound effects, vibrations and communication delays. Those on the inside undergo sleep deprivation and try to perform tasks. The researchers collect moment-to-moment metrics about individual performance, moods, psychosocial adaptation and more. NASA has formalised plans to send a crewed spacecraft to Mars, a journey that could involve 250 million miles of travel. Among the worldwide teams of researchers toiling over the journey's inherent physiological, engineering and social obstacles, Northwestern professors Noshir Contractor and Leslie DeChurch, and their collaborators, are charting a new course with a series of projects focused on the insights from the science of teams and networks. In a multiphase study conducted in two analog environments -- HERA in the Johnson Space Center in Houston and the SIRIUS mission in the NEK analog located in the Institute for Bio-Medical Problems (IBMP) in Russia -- scientists are studying the behavior of analog astronaut crews on mock missions, com
=Editorial use only
EN_01363287_0009 COV
ARCHIVE PICTURE SHOWS: Some of the study will be conducted at NASA's Human Exploration Research Analog (HERA) in the Johnson Space Center in Houston ....... STORY COPY: Researchers are locking astronauts up for long stretches - to see if they can get on with each other on a mission to Mars. While scientists are working on the technology to physically transport humans to other planets, the ability of people to get on in close confinement will be vital to mission success. As detailed by a new report (17 Feb), Northwestern University researchers are developing a predictive model to help NASA anticipate conflicts and communication breakdowns among crew members and head off problems that could make or break the Mission to Mars. The researchers have been culling data from the Human Experimentation Research Analog (HERA) at Houston's Johnson Space Center. HERA's capsule simulator houses astronauts for up to 45 days; a mock mission control outside the capsule augments the realism with sound effects, vibrations and communication delays. Those on the inside undergo sleep deprivation and try to perform tasks. The researchers collect moment-to-moment metrics about individual performance, moods, psychosocial adaptation and more. NASA has formalised plans to send a crewed spacecraft to Mars, a journey that could involve 250 million miles of travel. Among the worldwide teams of researchers toiling over the journey's inherent physiological, engineering and social obstacles, Northwestern professors Noshir Contractor and Leslie DeChurch, and their collaborators, are charting a new course with a series of projects focused on the insights from the science of teams and networks. In a multiphase study conducted in two analog environments -- HERA in the Johnson Space Center in Houston and the SIRIUS mission in the NEK analog located in the Institute for Bio-Medical Problems (IBMP) in Russia -- scientists are studying the behavior of analog astronaut crews on mock missions, com
=Editorial use only
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