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Rok po strzelaninie w w Douglas High School - NYT (35)

! EN_01362410_0009 NYT
One of many memorials set up around Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School in Parkland, Fla., Feb. 8, 2019. Students at the school knew their lives would be transformed by the mass shooting there. Now, a year later, many had no idea of the many ways that would happen. (Eve Edelheit/The New York Times)
MINIMALNA CENA 100USD!!!
! EN_01362410_0012 NYT
One of many memorials set up around Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School in Parkland, Fla., Feb. 12, 2019. On Feb. 14, 2018, a former student slaughtered 17 people at the high school. Since then, many Parkland students have become a force for gun control legislation and boosted the youth vote. (Eve Edelheit/The New York Times)
MINIMALNA CENA 100USD!!!
! EN_01362410_0024 NYT
One of the many supportive signs that still surround Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School in Parkland, Fla., 12, 2019. On Feb. 14, 2018, a former student slaughtered 17 people at the high school. Since then, many Parkland students have become a force for gun control legislation and boosted the youth vote. (Eve Edelheit/The New York Times)
MINIMALNA CENA 100USD!!!
! EN_01362410_0002 NYT
Sarah Lerner, 38, an English and journalism teacher and yearbook adviser at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School, pictured at home in Coral Springs, Fla., Feb. 11, 2019. Lerner compiled stories from the school's mass shooting survivors into a book. Two of her students, Jaime Guttenberg and Meadow Pollack, were killed. (Eve Edelheit/The New York Times)
MINIMALNA CENA 100USD!!!
! EN_01362410_0003 NYT
Angels glow in front a memorial garden, called Project Grow Love, set up for the victims of the mass shooting at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School in Parkland, Fla., Feb. 11, 2019. Students at the school knew their lives would be transformed by the massacre. Now, a year later, many had no idea of the many ways that would happen. (Eve Edelheit/The New York Times)
MINIMALNA CENA 100USD!!!
! EN_01362410_0010 NYT
Flowers Joaquin Oliver, known as Guac, gave to Tori Gonzalez last Valentine's Day, his "last act of love," she calls them, in a vase at her home in Coral Springs, Fla., Feb. 11, 2019. Gonzalez, 18, is now a senior at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School. Her boyfriend, Oliver, was killed in the mass shooting at the school a year ago on Valentine's Day. (Eve Edelheit/The New York Times)
MINIMALNA CENA 100USD!!!
! EN_01362410_0021 NYT
Tori Gonzalez, 18, a senior at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School whose boyfriend, Joaquin Oliver, known as Guac, was killed in the mass shooting a year ago, pictured at home in Coral Springs, Fla., Feb. 11, 2019. Only in December did Gonzalez take what she considered the first step toward healing: planting a memorial garden at the school to commemorate the lives lost. (Eve Edelheit/The New York Times)
MINIMALNA CENA 100USD!!!
! EN_01362410_0028 NYT
Tori Gonzalez, 18, a senior at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School whose boyfriend, Joaquin Oliver, known as Guac, was killed in the mass shooting a year ago, pictured at home in Coral Springs, Fla., Feb. 11, 2019. Only in December did Gonzalez take what she considered the first step toward healing: planting a memorial garden at the school to commemorate the lives lost. (Eve Edelheit/The New York Times)
MINIMALNA CENA 100USD!!!
! EN_01362410_0032 NYT
Tori Gonzalez, 18, a senior at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School whose boyfriend, Joaquin Oliver, known as Guac, was killed in the mass shooting a year ago, pictured at home in Coral Springs, Fla., Feb. 11, 2019. Only in December did Gonzalez take what she considered the first step toward healing: planting a memorial garden at the school to commemorate the lives lost. (Eve Edelheit/The New York Times)
MINIMALNA CENA 100USD!!!
! EN_01362410_0007 NYT
Emma Gonz?lez, a graduate from Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School, and Manuel Oliver, the father of Joaquin Oliver, who was killed at the high school's mass shooting last year, work together on a memorial mural for Joaquin Oliver at Mary M Bethune Elementary School in Hollywood, Fla., Feb. 10, 2019. Students at the school knew their lives would be transformed by the massacre. Now, a year later, many had no idea of the many ways that would happen. (Eve Edelheit/The New York Times)
MINIMALNA CENA 100USD!!!
! EN_01362410_0008 NYT
Jammal Lemy, 21, a 2017 Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School graduate who co-founded the March for Our Lives organization after the school's mass shooting, pictured at home in Coral Springs, Fla., Feb. 10, 2019. Lemy left college to help with merchandising, but became the organization's creative director after he designed a T-shirt that could be scanned with a cellphone to register someone to vote. (Eve Edelheit/The New York Times)
MINIMALNA CENA 100USD!!!
! EN_01362410_0011 NYT
Jammal Lemy, 21, a 2017 Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School graduate who co-founded the March for Our Lives organization after the school's mass shooting, pictured at home in Coral Springs, Fla., Feb. 10, 2019. Lemy left college to help with merchandising, but became the organization's creative director after he designed a T-shirt that could be scanned with a cellphone to register someone to vote. (Eve Edelheit/The New York Times)
MINIMALNA CENA 100USD!!!
! EN_01362410_0015 NYT
Manuel Oliver, 51, and Patricia Oliver, 52, parents of Joaquin Oliver, a student that was killed in the Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School mass shooting last year, at the unveiling of a mural for their son at Mary M Bethune Elementary School in Hollywood, Fla., Feb. 10, 2019. Like many other parents, Joaquin Oliver's mother and father have become dedicated activists since their son's death. One of them was elected to the local school board. While the families don't all share the same political views, they stay in touch and occasionally meet, knowing they are bound by the pain of losing a child. (Eve Edelheit/The New York Times)
MINIMALNA CENA 100USD!!!
! EN_01362410_0020 NYT
Emma Gonz?lez, a graduate from Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School, works on a memorial mural for Joaquin Oliver, who was killed at the high school's mass shooting last year, at Mary M Bethune Elementary School in Hollywood, Fla., Feb. 10, 2019. Students at the school knew their lives would be transformed by the massacre. Now, a year later, many had no idea of the many ways that would happen. (Eve Edelheit/The New York Times)
MINIMALNA CENA 100USD!!!
! EN_01362410_0022 NYT
Patricia Oliver, 52, the mother of Joaquin Oliver, a student that was killed in the Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School mass shooting last year, wears pins and jewelry in here son's honor at the unveiling of a mural for her son at Mary M Bethune Elementary School in Hollywood, Fla., Feb. 10, 2019. Like many other parents, Joaquin Oliver's mother and father have become dedicated activists since their son's death. One of them was elected to the local school board. While the families don't all share the same political views, they stay in touch and occasionally meet, knowing they are bound by the pain of losing a child. (Eve Edelheit/The New York Times)
MINIMALNA CENA 100USD!!!
! EN_01362410_0023 NYT
Coral Springs police officers Lt. Nicholas Mazzei, 46, left, and Capt. Brad Mock, 43, who were among the first emergency responders to enter the freshman building where a mass shooting occurred at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School last year, pictured at the police department in Coral springs, Fla., Feb. 10, 2019. The officers have been friends for more than 25 years. Their counterparts at the Broward Sheriff's Office were criticized for failing to try to confront the gunman. (Eve Edelheit/The New York Times)
MINIMALNA CENA 100USD!!!
! EN_01362410_0026 NYT
A mural of Joaquin Oliver before the stencil was peeled back, organized by a local charity and one the last of 17 community service projects created to honor each of the victims of the Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School shooting, at Mary M Bethune Elementary School in Hollywood, Fla., Feb. 10, 2019. (Eve Edelheit/The New York Times)
MINIMALNA CENA 100USD!!!
! EN_01362410_0031 NYT
Jammal Lemy, 21, a 2017 Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School graduate who co-founded the March for Our Lives organization after the school's mass shooting, pictured at home in Coral Springs, Fla., Feb. 10, 2019. Lemy left college to help with merchandising, but became the organization's creative director after he designed a T-shirt that could be scanned with a cellphone to register someone to vote. (Eve Edelheit/The New York Times)
MINIMALNA CENA 100USD!!!
! EN_01362410_0033 NYT
From left, Coral Springs Police Capt. Brad Mock, 43, and Lt. Nicholas Mazzei, 46, outside Marjorie Stoneman Douglas High School in Parkland, Fla., on Feb. 10, 2019. The officers -- who have been friends for more than 25 years -- were among the first emergency personnel to enter the freshman building after the mass shooting there last year. (Eve Edelheit/The New York Times)
MINIMALNA CENA 100USD!!!
! EN_01362410_0034 NYT
Painted stones in the First Responders Healing Garden at the Coral Springs Police Department, in Coral Springs, Fla., Feb. 10, 2019. Students at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School knew their lives would be transformed by the 2018 massacre. Now, a year later, many had no idea of the many ways that would happen. (Eve Edelheit/The New York Times)
MINIMALNA CENA 100USD!!!
! EN_01362410_0035 NYT
Manuel Oliver, the father of Joaquin Oliver, works on a mural of his son, who was killed in Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School's mass shooting last year, at Mary M Bethune Elementary School in Hollywood, Fla., Feb. 10, 2019. Students at the school knew their lives would be transformed by the massacre. Now, a year later, many had no idea of the many ways that would happen. (Eve Edelheit/The New York Times)
MINIMALNA CENA 100USD!!!
! EN_01362410_0006 NYT
Anna Crean, 16, a student at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School when a mass shooting killed 17 students last year, pictured at home in Parkland, Fla., Feb. 9, 2019. Now a sophomore, Crean was inside the freshman building where the shooting took place. Her lab partner, Alyssa Alhadeff, was killed. So were two of her creative-writing classmates. (Eve Edelheit/The New York Times)
MINIMALNA CENA 100USD!!!
! EN_01362410_0018 NYT
Tori Gonzalez, 18, a senior at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School, works with Rhuel White, 6, in the Project Grow Love memorial garden, at the high school in Parkland, Fla., Feb. 9, 2019. Gonzalez lost her boyfriend, Joaquin Oliver, known as Guac, in the mass shooting at the school a year ago. (Eve Edelheit/The New York Times)
MINIMALNA CENA 100USD!!!
! EN_01362410_0029 NYT
Anna Crean, 16, a student at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School when a mass shooting killed 17 students last year, pictured at home in Parkland, Fla., Feb. 9, 2019. Now a sophomore, Crean was inside the freshman building where the shooting took place. Her lab partner, Alyssa Alhadeff, was killed. So were two of her creative-writing classmates. (Eve Edelheit/The New York Times)
MINIMALNA CENA 100USD!!!
! EN_01362410_0030 NYT
Tori Gonzalez, 18, a senior at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School, works with Rhuel White, 6, in the Project Grow Love memorial garden, at the high school in Parkland, Fla., Feb. 9, 2019. Gonzalez lost her boyfriend, Joaquin Oliver, known as Guac, in the mass shooting at the school a year ago. (Eve Edelheit/The New York Times)
MINIMALNA CENA 100USD!!!
! EN_01362410_0005 NYT
Stones with the names of each victim of the Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School mass shooting lay in the Project Grow Love memorial garden, at the high school in Parkland, Fla., Feb. 8, 2019. Students at the school knew their lives would be transformed by the massacre. Now, a year later, many had no idea of the many ways that would happen. (Eve Edelheit/The New York Times)
MINIMALNA CENA 100USD!!!
! EN_01362410_0014 NYT
Students walk past memorial ribbons across the street from Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School in Parkland, Fla., Feb. 8, 2019. On Feb. 14, 2018, a former student slaughtered 17 people at the high school. Since then, many Parkland students have become a force for gun control legislation and boosted the youth vote. (Eve Edelheit/The New York Times)
MINIMALNA CENA 100USD!!!
! EN_01362410_0017 NYT
Stones with the names of each victim of the Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School mass shooting lay in the Project Grow Love memorial garden, at the high school in Parkland, Fla., Feb. 8, 2019. Students at the school knew their lives would be transformed by the massacre. Now, a year later, many had no idea of the many ways that would happen. (Eve Edelheit/The New York Times)
MINIMALNA CENA 100USD!!!
! EN_01362410_0019 NYT
A memorial garden, called Project Grow Love, set up for the victims of the mass shooting at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School in Parkland, Fla., Feb. 8, 2019. Students at the school knew their lives would be transformed by the massacre. Now, a year later, many had no idea of the many ways that would happen. (Eve Edelheit/The New York Times)
MINIMALNA CENA 100USD!!!
! EN_01362410_0004 NYT
Anthony Borges, 16, who was a student at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School during a mass shooting a year ago and took five bullets to protect his classmates, pictured in Fort Lauderdale, Fla., Feb. 7, 2019. "I haven't gone back to school because I haven't seen a change. The security failed. They need to put in metal detectors. I am being home-schooled. But I would like to go to another school someday," said Borges. (Eve Edelheit/The New York Times)
MINIMALNA CENA 100USD!!!
! EN_01362410_0016 NYT
Anthony Borges, 16, who was a student at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School during a mass shooting a year ago and took five bullets to protect his classmates, pictured in Fort Lauderdale, Fla., Feb. 7, 2019. "I haven't gone back to school because I haven't seen a change. The security failed. They need to put in metal detectors. I am being home-schooled. But I would like to go to another school someday," said Borges. (Eve Edelheit/The New York Times)
MINIMALNA CENA 100USD!!!
! EN_01362410_0025 NYT
Anthony Borges, 16, who was a student at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School during a mass shooting a year ago and took five bullets to protect his classmates, pictured in Fort Lauderdale, Fla., Feb. 7, 2019. "I haven't gone back to school because I haven't seen a change. The security failed. They need to put in metal detectors. I am being home-schooled. But I would like to go to another school someday," said Borges. (Eve Edelheit/The New York Times)
MINIMALNA CENA 100USD!!!
! EN_01362410_0027 NYT
Anthony Borges, 16, who was a student at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School during a mass shooting a year ago and took five bullets to protect his classmates, pictured in Fort Lauderdale, Fla., Feb. 7, 2019. "I haven't gone back to school because I haven't seen a change. The security failed. They need to put in metal detectors. I am being home-schooled. But I would like to go to another school someday," said Borges. (Eve Edelheit/The New York Times)
MINIMALNA CENA 100USD!!!
! EN_01362410_0013 NYT
FILE-- Tens of thousands attend the March for Our Lives rally outside City Hall in San Francisco, March 24, 2018. On Feb. 14, 2018, a former student slaughtered 17 people at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School in Parkland, Fla. Since then, the Parkland students have become a force for gun control legislation and boosted the youth vote. (Jim Wilson/The New York Times)
A MARCH 24, 2018 FILE PHOTO. MINIMALNA CENA 100USD!!!
! EN_01362410_0001 NYT
FILE-- Student leaders from Parkland, Fla., meet to discuss plans for Saturday's March for Our Lives demonstration, in Washington, March 23, 2018. On Feb. 14, 2018, a former student slaughtered 17 people at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School in Parkland, Fla. Since then, the Parkland students have become a force for gun control legislation and boosted the youth vote. From left: David Hogg, Matt Deitsch, Emma Gonz?lez and march organizer Josh Burstein. (Erin Schaff/The New York Times)
A MARCH 23, 2018 FILE PHOTO. MINIMALNA CENA 100USD!!!
Rocznice 2018 Na wyłączność