zamknij [x]
do:

Długoterminowa antykoncepcja (3)

EN_01357709_0001 FER
Ferrari Press Agency Ref 10024 Patch 1 15/01/2019 See Ferrari text Picture must credit: Christopher Moore / Georgia Institute of Technology A new long-acting contraceptive, which sticks to the skin and is designed to be self-administered by women, has been developed.It uses micro-needle skin patch technology originally developed for the painless administration of vaccines.The team behind it hope it will provide a new family planning option, particularly in developing nations where access to healthcare can be limitedLong-acting contraceptives now available provide the highest level of effectiveness, but usually require a healthcare professional to inject a drug or implant a device. Short-acting techniques, on the other hand, require frequent compliance by users and therefore are often not as effective.In animal testing, an experimental micro-needle contraceptive patch worked for more than a month with a single application to the skin.When the patch is applied for several seconds, the microscopic needles break off and remain under the surface of the skin, where biodegradable polymers slowly release the contraceptive drug levonorgestrel over time. The patch was created at the Georgia Institute of Technology in the USA.Chemical and biomolecular engineering school professor Mark Prausnitz, said, the study author, said:??? "There is a lot of interest in providing more options for long-acting contraceptives.."Our goal is for women to be able to self-administer long-acting contraceptives with the micro-needle patch that would be applied to the skin for five seconds just once a month. OPS: Professor Mark Prausnitz holds an experimental microneedle contraceptive skin patch. Designed to be self-administered by women for long-acting contraception, the patch could provide a new family planning option. Picture supplied by Ferrari
EN_01357709_0002 FER
Ferrari Press Agency Ref 10024 Patch 1 15/01/2019 See Ferrari text Picture must credit: Christopher Moore / Georgia Institute of Technology A new long-acting contraceptive, which sticks to the skin and is designed to be self-administered by women, has been developed.It uses micro-needle skin patch technology originally developed for the painless administration of vaccines.The team behind it hope it will provide a new family planning option, particularly in developing nations where access to healthcare can be limitedLong-acting contraceptives now available provide the highest level of effectiveness, but usually require a healthcare professional to inject a drug or implant a device. Short-acting techniques, on the other hand, require frequent compliance by users and therefore are often not as effective.In animal testing, an experimental micro-needle contraceptive patch worked for more than a month with a single application to the skin.When the patch is applied for several seconds, the microscopic needles break off and remain under the surface of the skin, where biodegradable polymers slowly release the contraceptive drug levonorgestrel over time. The patch was created at the Georgia Institute of Technology in the USA.Chemical and biomolecular engineering school professor Mark Prausnitz, said, the study author, said:??? "There is a lot of interest in providing more options for long-acting contraceptives.."Our goal is for women to be able to self-administer long-acting contraceptives with the micro-needle patch that would be applied to the skin for five seconds just once a month. OPS: This image shows how an experimental microneedle contraceptive skin patch coould be applied to the skin. Designed to be self-administered by women for long-acting contraception, the patch could provide a new family planning option. Picture supplied by Ferrari
EN_01357709_0003 FER
Ferrari Press Agency Ref 10024 Patch 1 15/01/2019 See Ferrari text Picture must credit: Christopher Moore / Georgia Institute of Technology A new long-acting contraceptive, which sticks to the skin and is designed to be self-administered by women, has been developed.It uses micro-needle skin patch technology originally developed for the painless administration of vaccines.The team behind it hope it will provide a new family planning option, particularly in developing nations where access to healthcare can be limitedLong-acting contraceptives now available provide the highest level of effectiveness, but usually require a healthcare professional to inject a drug or implant a device. Short-acting techniques, on the other hand, require frequent compliance by users and therefore are often not as effective.In animal testing, an experimental micro-needle contraceptive patch worked for more than a month with a single application to the skin.When the patch is applied for several seconds, the microscopic needles break off and remain under the surface of the skin, where biodegradable polymers slowly release the contraceptive drug levonorgestrel over time. The patch was created at the Georgia Institute of Technology in the USA.Chemical and biomolecular engineering school professor Mark Prausnitz, said, the study author, said:??? "There is a lot of interest in providing more options for long-acting contraceptives.."Our goal is for women to be able to self-administer long-acting contraceptives with the micro-needle patch that would be applied to the skin for five seconds just once a month. OPS: Professor Mark Prausnitz and Postdoctoral Research Scholar Wei Li examine an experimental microneedle contraceptive skin patch. Designed to be self-administered by women for long-acting contraception, the patch could provide a new family planning option. Picture supplied by Ferrari
Rocznice 2018 Na wyłączność