czwartek, 24 stycznia 2019
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Implant dla cierpiących na nietrzymanie moczu (6)

EN_01356927_0001 FER
Ferrari Press Agency Ref 10011 Bladder 1 10/01/2019 See Ferrari text Picture MUST credit: Northwestern University A tiny soft, wireless implant may someday help people who suffer from overactive bladder get through the day with fewer bathroom breaks.It can detect over-activity in the bladder and then use light from tiny, bio-integrated LEDs to damp down the urge to urinateThe technique for controlling cells with light, known as optogenetics, regulates nerve cells in the bladder.The tiny device that has potential to help people with bladder problems bypass the need for medication or electronic stimulators.It was developed by a US team of neuroscientists and engineers from Northwestern University, Washington University in St. Louis and the University of Illinois in Urbana-Champaign.The device works in laboratory rats and one day may help people who suffer incontinence or frequently feel the need to urinate.In experiments , the rats had medication-induced overactive bladders, and the device successfully alleviated the problem..The new strategy is outlined in a paper published in the journal Nature. Northwestern???s John A. Rogers and Washington University???s Robert W. Gereau IV led the research. OPS: CT scan of a lab rat with the device implanted Oictrure supplied by Ferrari
EN_01356927_0002 FER
Ferrari Press Agency Ref 10011 Bladder 1 10/01/2019 See Ferrari text Picture MUST credit: Northwestern University A tiny soft, wireless implant may someday help people who suffer from overactive bladder get through the day with fewer bathroom breaks.It can detect over-activity in the bladder and then use light from tiny, bio-integrated LEDs to damp down the urge to urinateThe technique for controlling cells with light, known as optogenetics, regulates nerve cells in the bladder.The tiny device that has potential to help people with bladder problems bypass the need for medication or electronic stimulators.It was developed by a US team of neuroscientists and engineers from Northwestern University, Washington University in St. Louis and the University of Illinois in Urbana-Champaign.The device works in laboratory rats and one day may help people who suffer incontinence or frequently feel the need to urinate.In experiments , the rats had medication-induced overactive bladders, and the device successfully alleviated the problem..The new strategy is outlined in a paper published in the journal Nature. Northwestern???s John A. Rogers and Washington University???s Robert W. Gereau IV led the research. OPS: CT scan of a lab rat with the device implanted around its bladder Oictrure supplied by Ferrari
EN_01356927_0005 FER
Ferrari Press Agency Ref 10011 Bladder 1 10/01/2019 See Ferrari text Picture MUST credit: Northwestern University A tiny soft, wireless implant may someday help people who suffer from overactive bladder get through the day with fewer bathroom breaks.It can detect over-activity in the bladder and then use light from tiny, bio-integrated LEDs to damp down the urge to urinateThe technique for controlling cells with light, known as optogenetics, regulates nerve cells in the bladder.The tiny device that has potential to help people with bladder problems bypass the need for medication or electronic stimulators.It was developed by a US team of neuroscientists and engineers from Northwestern University, Washington University in St. Louis and the University of Illinois in Urbana-Champaign.The device works in laboratory rats and one day may help people who suffer incontinence or frequently feel the need to urinate.In experiments , the rats had medication-induced overactive bladders, and the device successfully alleviated the problem..The new strategy is outlined in a paper published in the journal Nature. Northwestern???s John A. Rogers and Washington University???s Robert W. Gereau IV led the research. OPS: The implant.Demonstration showing how the LED glows green to damp down the urge or the wearer to urinate Oictrure supplied by Ferrari
EN_01356927_0006 FER
Ferrari Press Agency Ref 10011 Bladder 1 10/01/2019 See Ferrari text Picture MUST credit: Northwestern University A tiny soft, wireless implant may someday help people who suffer from overactive bladder get through the day with fewer bathroom breaks.It can detect over-activity in the bladder and then use light from tiny, bio-integrated LEDs to damp down the urge to urinateThe technique for controlling cells with light, known as optogenetics, regulates nerve cells in the bladder.The tiny device that has potential to help people with bladder problems bypass the need for medication or electronic stimulators.It was developed by a US team of neuroscientists and engineers from Northwestern University, Washington University in St. Louis and the University of Illinois in Urbana-Champaign.The device works in laboratory rats and one day may help people who suffer incontinence or frequently feel the need to urinate.In experiments , the rats had medication-induced overactive bladders, and the device successfully alleviated the problem..The new strategy is outlined in a paper published in the journal Nature. Northwestern???s John A. Rogers and Washington University???s Robert W. Gereau IV led the research. OPS: One of the lead researchers, John A Rogers from Northwestern University Oictrure supplied by Ferrari
EN_01356927_0003 FER
Ferrari Press Agency Ref 10011 Bladder 1 10/01/2019 See Ferrari text Picture MUST credit: Northwestern University A tiny soft, wireless implant may someday help people who suffer from overactive bladder get through the day with fewer bathroom breaks.It can detect over-activity in the bladder and then use light from tiny, bio-integrated LEDs to damp down the urge to urinateThe technique for controlling cells with light, known as optogenetics, regulates nerve cells in the bladder.The tiny device that has potential to help people with bladder problems bypass the need for medication or electronic stimulators.It was developed by a US team of neuroscientists and engineers from Northwestern University, Washington University in St. Louis and the University of Illinois in Urbana-Champaign.The device works in laboratory rats and one day may help people who suffer incontinence or frequently feel the need to urinate.In experiments , the rats had medication-induced overactive bladders, and the device successfully alleviated the problem..The new strategy is outlined in a paper published in the journal Nature. Northwestern???s John A. Rogers and Washington University???s Robert W. Gereau IV led the research. OPS: The implant.Demonstration showing how the LED glows green to damp down the urge or the wearer to urinate Oictrure supplied by Ferrari
EN_01356927_0004 FER
Ferrari Press Agency Ref 10011 Bladder 1 10/01/2019 See Ferrari text Picture MUST credit: Northwestern University A tiny soft, wireless implant may someday help people who suffer from overactive bladder get through the day with fewer bathroom breaks.It can detect over-activity in the bladder and then use light from tiny, bio-integrated LEDs to damp down the urge to urinateThe technique for controlling cells with light, known as optogenetics, regulates nerve cells in the bladder.The tiny device that has potential to help people with bladder problems bypass the need for medication or electronic stimulators.It was developed by a US team of neuroscientists and engineers from Northwestern University, Washington University in St. Louis and the University of Illinois in Urbana-Champaign.The device works in laboratory rats and one day may help people who suffer incontinence or frequently feel the need to urinate.In experiments , the rats had medication-induced overactive bladders, and the device successfully alleviated the problem..The new strategy is outlined in a paper published in the journal Nature. Northwestern???s John A. Rogers and Washington University???s Robert W. Gereau IV led the research. OPS: The implant. Oictrure supplied by Ferrari
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