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Image State Heritage Space (271)

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EN_01354825_0001 IMA
Surface of the planet Mercury.
EN_01354825_0002 IMA
Astronaut Walter Cunningham during the Apollo 7 mission, October 1968. US astronaut Walter Cunningham (born 1932) was the Lunar Module pilot on the Apollo 7 mission, the first mission in the United States' Apollo program to carry a crew into space. The crew transmitted the first live television broadcast aboard an American manned spacecraft.
EN_01354825_0003 IMA
Astronaut Joe Engle, second Space Shuttle flight, November 1981. US pilot, aeronautical engineer and astronaut Joe Engle (born 1932) was Commander on the second flight of the Space Shuttle, STS-2.
EN_01354825_0004 IMA
Buzz Aldrin and Neil Armstrong in quarantine after returning from the Moon landing, Apollo 11 mission, July 1969. The Apollo 11 Lunar Module, code named Eagle, with US astronauts Neil Armstrong and Buzz Aldrin on board, landed in the Sea of Tranquillity on 20 July 1969. Apollo 11 was the fifth manned Apollo mission, and was the first to land on the Moon.
EN_01354825_0005 IMA
Taurus-Littrow Region, Apollo 17 mission, December 1972. View of the surface of the Moon from the Apollo spacecraft. Apollo 17 was the last Apollo Moon landing mission.
EN_01354825_0006 IMA
Earth from space - east coast of the USA, c1980s. Cloud cover and Atlantic coastline.
EN_01354825_0007 IMA
Earth from space - coast of the USA from the Gulf of Mexico, c1980s.
EN_01354825_0008 IMA
Baja California seen from aboard the second Space Shuttle flight, November 1981. The Baja California Peninsula, a state in western Mexico, which protrudes into the Pacific Ocean.
EN_01354825_0009 IMA
President Ronald Reagan speaks to astronauts on the second Space Shuttle flight, Johnson Space Center in Houston, Texas, USA, November 1981. US President Ronald Reagan (1911-2004) jokingly asking STS-2 'Columbia' crewmembers Joe Engle and Richard Truly to pick him up in Washington, DC, on their way to their California landing site.
EN_01354825_0010 IMA
Earth from space - Dasht-E-Lut, Iran, second Space Shuttle flight, 1981. The Lut Desert, (Dasht-e Lut), is a large salt desert in the provinces of Kerman and Sistan and Baluchestan, Iran.
EN_01354825_0011 IMA
Earth from space - the Great Barrier Reef, Australia, seen from Space Shuttle, 1983. STS-8 was the eighth NASA Space Shuttle mission, and the third flight of the Space Shuttle Challenger. It launched on 30 August and landed on 5 September 1983.
EN_01354825_0012 IMA
Earth from space - Eleuthera Island, Bahamas, c1980s.
EN_01354825_0013 IMA
Earth from space - east coast of the USA, c1980s. Cloud cover and Atlantic coastline.
EN_01354825_0014 IMA
Martian planet surface, Viking 1 Mission to Mars, 1976. The Viking 1 spacecraft, part of NASA's Viking programme, was the first spacecraft to land successfully on Mars and perform its mission. It sent images of the Martian surface back to Earth.
EN_01354825_0015 IMA
Rock-strewn Martian surface, Viking Lander mission, 1970s. NASA's Viking program consisted of a pair of American space probes sent to Mars, Viking 1 and Viking 2. Each spacecraft was composed of an orbiter, designed to photograph the surface of Mars from orbit, and a lander, designed to study the planet from the surface.
EN_01354825_0016 IMA
Earth's atmosphere, view from Apollo II spacecraft, July 1969. Apollo 11 was the fifth manned Apollo mission, and was the first to land on the Moon. The Apollo 11 Lunar Module, code named Eagle, with US astronauts Neil Armstrong and Buzz Aldrin on board, landed in the Sea of Tranquillity on 20 July 1969.
EN_01354825_0017 IMA
Earth from space - Africa and the Atlantic Ocean, c1980s. Planet Earth showing the Sahara Desert, with Europe at the top.
EN_01354825_0018 IMA
Astronaut Edward White performs the first American spacewalk, 3 June 1965. US astronaut Edward H White II, pilot of the Gemini IV four-day Earth-orbital mission, floats in the zero gravity of space outside the Gemini IV spacecraft. He wears a specially designed spacesuit; and the visor of the helmet is gold plated to protect him against the unfiltered rays of the sun. He wears an emergency oxygen pack, also. He is secured to the spacecraft by a 25-feet umbilical line and a 23-feet tether line, both wrapped in gold tape to form one cord. In his right hand is a Hand-Held Self-Maneuvering Unit (HHSMU) with which he controls his movements in space. Astronaut James A. McDivitt, command pilot of the mission, remained inside the spacecraft.
EN_01354825_0019 IMA
Technician installing eye-glasses in helmet.
EN_01354825_0020 IMA
Astronauts being recovered from the sea, Apollo 16 mission, 27 April 1972. Prime recovery helicopter hovering over the Apollo 16 spacecraft after splashdown, 11 days after launch. Apollo 16 was the tenth manned mission in NASA's Apollo space program - the crew were John Young, Charles Duke and Ken Mattingly. Young and Duke spent 71 hours on the lunar surface. They were recovered from the Pacific Ocean by USS 'Ticonderoga'.
EN_01354825_0021 IMA
Astronauts Joe Engle and Richard Truly, second Space Shuttle flight, November 1981. US pilot, aeronautical engineer and astronaut Joe Engle (born 1932) was Commander on the second flight of the Space Shuttle, STS-2. Fighter pilot and astronaut Richard Truly (born 1937) was the first man to be launched into space on his birthday.
EN_01354825_0022 IMA
Earth from space - the Indian Ocean off Australia seen from Gemini 11, September 1966. Gemini 11 was the ninth manned spaceflight mission of NASA's Project Gemini, which flew from 12 to 15 September 1966.
EN_01354825_0023 IMA
Earth from space - radar image of Los Angeles, USA, second Space Shuttle flight, 1981. The urban area of Los Angeles, California, with the coast of the Pacific Ocean.
EN_01354825_0024 IMA
Earth from space - the Mediterranean, c1980s. Cloud cover over Europe, with the Mediterranean sea visible in the centre.
EN_01354825_0025 IMA
Earth from space - the Gulf of Mexico and Florida, USA, c1980s.
EN_01354825_0026 IMA
Earth from space - the Hawaiian Islands, USA, c1980s. Cloud cover over Hawaii in the Pacific Ocean.
EN_01354825_0027 IMA
Earth from space - thunderstorm over the Pacific Ocean, c1980s. Thick cloud cover.
EN_01354825_0028 IMA
Earth from space - the United Kingdom, c1980s. Great Britain and the Republic of Ireland, the Channel, northern France and the North Sea.
EN_01354825_0029 IMA
Earth from space - the Mississippi River and St Louis, USA, c1980s. Two views of the city of St Louis, Missouri, near the confluence of the Missouri and Mississippi rivers.
EN_01354825_0030 IMA
Earth from space - the Gulf of Oman and Strait of Hormuz, second Space Shuttle flight, 1981. The Gulf of Oman is a strait which connects the Arabian Sea with the Strait of Hormuz. The Gulf borders Iran, Pakistan, Oman and the United Arab Emirates.
EN_01354825_0031 IMA
Pixellated Earth from space, c1980s.
EN_01354825_0032 IMA
Earth from space - Las Vegas and the Mojave Desert, Nevada, USA, c1980s. Las Vegas surrounded by mountains, with Lake Mead also visible.
EN_01354825_0033 IMA
Earth from space - Phoenix, Arizona, USA, c1980s.
EN_01354825_0034 IMA
Earth from space - Imperial Valley, California, USA, seen from the Space Shuttle, c1980s. On the right is the Salton Sea, a shallow, saline, endorheic rift lake located directly on the San Andreas Fault. Also visible are the Peninsular Ranges of southern California , block fault mountains in southwest Arizona, and the Mojave Desert.
EN_01354825_0035 IMA
Earth from space - the Straits of Gibraltar, c1980s. The point where Europe and Africa meet: Gibraltar on the southern tip of Spain almost touches the coast of Morocco, with the Atlantic Ocean on one side and the Mediterranean Sea on the other.
EN_01354825_0036 IMA
Clouds 39,000 feet north of Stavanger, Norway, seen from DC-8 plane. Type I and Type II polar stratospheric clouds near the North Pole. Type I are the dark orange or brown layer, and Type II is the white layer above. NASA operates a modified Douglas DC-8 jetliner aircraft as a flying science laboratory.
EN_01354825_0037 IMA
Earth from Apollo 15, 26 July 1971. Planet Earth photographed by the Apollo 15 crew, from between 25,000 and 30,000 nautical miles away. The United States, Central America and part of Canada can be seen at the left, with South America at lower centre. Spain and the northwest part of Africa can be seen at right. Also visible is a large North Atlantic storm front moving over Greenland (upper centre).
EN_01354825_0038 IMA
North and Central America from Apollo 16, 16 April 1972. Earth from the Apollo 16 spacecraft, showing North America and the Pacific Ocean. Lake Michigan and Lake Superior, Florida, Mexico and part of Central America are also visible.
EN_01354825_0039 IMA
Astronauts John Young and Robert Crippen after landing, Edwards Air Force Base, California, USA, April 1981. US astronauts Young and Crippen were the two-man crew aboard the first orbiter, 'Columbia', STS-1 (Space Transportation System-1). It was the first orbital spaceflight of NASA's Space Shuttle programme. It launched on 12 April 1981 and returned on 14 April, 54.5 hours later, having orbited the Earth 36 times.
EN_01354825_0040 IMA
Earth from space - cyclone, c1980s. Spiral weather pattern.
EN_01354825_0041 IMA
Light effects over La Meije, France. Long-exposure image of stars over the Massif des Écrins in south-eastern France.
EN_01354825_0042 IMA
Lunar landing site, Apollo 17 mission, December 1972. US astronauts Eugene Cernan and Harrison Schmitt collected samples and drove the Lunar Roving Vehicle at the Taurus-Littrow Landing Site on the Moon. Apollo 17 was the last Apollo Moon landing mission.
EN_01354825_0043 IMA
The Himalayas between China and Tibet, seen from aboard the second Space Shuttle flight, November 1981. A lake in the Himalayan mountain range.
EN_01354825_0044 IMA
Earth from space - clouds over Mexico and Guatemala, second Space Shuttle flight, 1981.
EN_01354825_0045 IMA
India-Pakistan boundary seen from aboard the second Space Shuttle flight, November 1981. The border between India and Pakistan stretches from the Arabian Sea to the foothills of the Himalayan Mountains.
EN_01354825_0046 IMA
Earth from space - the Sudan, c1980s. Part of East Africa.
EN_01354825_0047 IMA
Earth from Space.
EN_01354825_0048 IMA
The Tibetan Plateau seen from aboard the first Space Shuttle flight, April 1981. View of the Tibetan or Himalayan Plateau (known in China as the Qinghai-Tibet Plateau or the Qing-Zang Plateau) in Central Asia. It covers most of the Tibet Autonomous Region and Qinghai in western China, as well as part of Ladakh in Jammu and Kashmir in northern India.
EN_01354825_0049 IMA
Earth from space - Africa, c1980s. Planet Earth showing Africa and part of the Middle East, with Europe at the top.
EN_01354825_0050 IMA
Earth from space - Mount Fujiyama volcano, Japan, second Space Shuttle flight, 1981. Mount Fuji and the Pacific coast, seen from the Space Shuttle.
EN_01354825_0051 IMA
Earth from space - the Straits of Gibraltar, c1980s. The point where Europe and Africa meet: Gibraltar on the southern tip of Spain almost touches the coast of Morocco, with the Atlantic Ocean on one side and the Mediterranean Sea on the other.
EN_01354825_0052 IMA
Earth from space - the Indian Ocean, c1980s. Southern India and Sri Lanka with the Maldives chain.
EN_01354825_0053 IMA
Earth from space - the Sinai Peninsula, Egypt, c1980s. Showing the Gulf of Suez, the Red Sea and the Gulf of Aqaba.
EN_01354825_0054 IMA
Earth with Venus rising, c1980s. The planet Venus with Earth in the foreground, seen from space.
EN_01354825_0055 IMA
Earth rising above the Moon, seen from Apollo 15, July-August 1971. The crescent Earth rises above the lunar horizon, taken from the Apollo 17 spacecraft in lunar orbit during the final lunar landing mission in the Apollo program.
EN_01354825_0056 IMA
Earth from space - the Mississippi River in Louisiana, USA, c1980s.
EN_01354825_0057 IMA
Earth from space - Mexico, c1980s. Cloud cover over the Pacific Ocean, Gulf of California and Baja California (left), with the Gulf of Mexico on the right. Also visible are the states of Arizona, New Mexico and Texas in the United States.
EN_01354825_0058 IMA
Earth from Space.
EN_01354825_0059 IMA
Earth from space - Europe seen from a satellite, c1980s. France in the centre, with Great Britain to the north, and to the south can be seen Italy and the Mediterranean, with Corsica, Sardinia, Sicily and the north coast of Africa.
EN_01354825_0060 IMA
Baja California and the Sea of Cortes, seen from aboard the first Space Shuttle flight, April 1981. The Baja California Peninsula, a state in western Mexico, which protrudes into the Pacific Ocean. Also is visible is the curvature of the Earth.
EN_01354825_0061 IMA
Earth from space - eye of a storm seen from Gemini 5, 1965.
EN_01354825_0062 IMA
Earth from space - the Gulf coast, Houston and Galveston Bay, USA, c1980s.
EN_01354825_0063 IMA
Earth from space, Apollo II mission, July 1969. Planet Earth showing the land mass of Africa, seen from the Apollo II spacecraft. Apollo 11 was the fifth manned Apollo mission, and was the first to land on the Moon.
EN_01354825_0064 IMA
Space Shuttle 'Columbia' lifts off, Kennedy Space Center, Merritt Island, Florida, USA. Columbia first launched in 1981 and her last flight was in 2003.
EN_01354825_0065 IMA
Solid rocket booster separates, first Space Shuttle flight, 12 April 1981. STS-1 (Space Transportation System-1) was the first mission of Orbiter 'Columbia', and the first orbital spaceflight of NASA's Space Shuttle programme. It was launched from Kennedy Space Center, Merritt Island, Florida, USA. The solid rocket boosters fire for the first two minutes of flight, along with the shuttle's main engines, in order for the spacecraft to break free of Earth's gravity. Here they are seen dropping away, no longer needed, as Columbia passes an altitude of about 28 miles.
EN_01354825_0066 IMA
Saturn V rocket lifting off, Kennedy Space Center, Merritt Island, Florida, USA. The Saturn V was the largest rocket ever built and was used on all Apollo missions to the moon.
EN_01354825_0067 IMA
Space Shuttle 'Columbia' lifting off, Kennedy Space Center, Merritt Island, Florida, USA, 1980s. 'Columbia' was in operation from 1981 to 2003.
EN_01354825_0068 IMA
Launch of Saturn V rocket, Kennedy Space Center, Merritt Island, Florida, USA, 7 December 1972. Apollo 17 was the last Apollo Moon landing mission and the only one to be launched at night.
EN_01354825_0069 IMA
Space Shuttle 'Atlantis' launching from Kennedy Space Center, Merritt Island, Florida, USA, 1980s. 'Atlantis' was in operation between 1985 and 2011.
EN_01354825_0070 IMA
Launch of Mercury-Atlas 4, Cape Canaveral Air Force Station, Merritt Island, Florida, USA, 13 September 1961. Launch of Mercury-Atlas 4 (MA-4) spacecraft, an unmanned spaceflight in NASA's Mercury programme.
EN_01354825_0071 IMA
Saturn 1B lift off from Launch Complex 34, Kennedy Space Center, Florida, USA, 1960s. NASA launch vehicle used during the Apollo space programme.
EN_01354825_0072 IMA
Apollo 9 Saturn V rocket with full moon, 1969. This rocket, shown here on its launch pad at the Kennedy Space Centre, Cape canaveral, Florida, USA, launched Apollo 9 on 3 March 1969, carrying astronauts James McDivitt, David Scott and Russell Schweickart, into earth orbit where they tested the full Apollo moon craft for the first time. The Saturn V was the largest rocket ever built and was used on all Apollo missions to the moon.
EN_01354825_0073 IMA
Rocket lifting off, Kennedy Space Center, Merritt Island, Florida, USA.
EN_01354825_0074 IMA
Space Shuttle 'Atlantis' launching from Kennedy Space Center, Merritt Island, Florida, USA, 1980s. 'Atlantis' was in operation between 1985 and 2011.
EN_01354825_0075 IMA
Space Shuttle Orbiter 'Discovery' at Launch Complex 39, Kennedy Space Center, Merritt Island, Florida, USA. 'Discovery' was in operation between 1984 and 2011.
EN_01354825_0076 IMA
Orbiter 'Challenger' on launch pad, Kennedy Space Center, Merritt Island, Florida, USA, 1980s. The Space Shuttle Challenger was the second orbiter of NASA's space shuttle programme and was in operation between 1983 and 1986. She broke apart on her final mission, STS-51-L, on 28 January 1986. A structural failure during the ascent phase 73 seconds after launch resulted in a catastrophic accident which killed all seven crew members.
EN_01354825_0077 IMA
Craters on the Moon.
EN_01354825_0078 IMA
Buzz Aldrin deploys solar wind collector on the surface of the Moon, Apollo 11 mission, July 1969. The Apollo 11 Lunar Module, code named Eagle, with US astronauts Neil Armstrong and Buzz Aldrin on board, landed in the Sea of Tranquillity on 20 July 1969. Apollo 11 was the fifth manned Apollo mission, and was the first to land on the Moon.
EN_01354825_0079 IMA
Buzz Aldrin on the Moon, Apollo II mission, July 1969. Reflected in Aldrin's visor are Neil Armstrong taking the photograph, the US flag, and the 'Eagle'. The Apollo 11 Lunar Module, code named Eagle, with US astronauts Neil Armstrong and Buzz Aldrin on board, landed in the Sea of Tranquillity on 20 July 1969. Apollo 11 was the fifth manned Apollo mission, and was the first to land on the Moon.
EN_01354825_0080 IMA
Buzz Aldrin on the Moon, Apollo II mission, July 1969. Reflected in Aldrin's visor are Neil Armstrong taking the photograph, the US flag, and the 'Eagle'. The Apollo 11 Lunar Module, code named Eagle, with US astronauts Neil Armstrong and Buzz Aldrin on board, landed in the Sea of Tranquillity on 20 July 1969. Apollo 11 was the fifth manned Apollo mission, and was the first to land on the Moon.
EN_01354825_0081 IMA
Harrison Schmitt works the scoop on the lunar surface, Apollo 17 mission, December 1972. US astronaut Harrison Schmitt (born 1935), the 12th man to walk on the Moon, was also the first geologist to set foot on the lunar surface.
EN_01354825_0082 IMA
Eugene Cernan using the Rover on the lunar surface, Apollo 17 mission, December 1972. US astronauts Eugene Cernan and Harrison Schmitt collected samples and drove the Lunar Roving Vehicle at the Taurus-Littrow Landing Site on the Moon. Apollo 17 was the last Apollo Moon landing mission.
EN_01354825_0083 IMA
Astronaut Harrison Schmitt with US flag on the surface of the Moon, Apollo 17 mission, December 1972. Earth can be seen floating above the flag. US astronauts Eugene Cernan and Harrison Schmitt took samples from the lunar surface. Apollo 17 was the last Apollo Moon landing mission.
EN_01354825_0084 IMA
Buzz Aldrin stands next to the American flag on the surface of the Moon, Apollo 11 mission, July 1969. US astronaut Edwin E "Buzz" Aldrin, Jr, lunar module pilot of the first lunar landing mission, in the Sea of Tranquility during an Apollo 11 moon walk. The footprints of the astronauts are clearly visible in the lunar soil. Astronaut Neil Armstrong, commander, took this picture with a 70mm Hasselblad lunar surface camera. The Apollo 11 Lunar Module, code named Eagle, with Neil Armstrong and Buzz Aldrin on board, landed in the Sea of Tranquillity on 20 July 1969. Apollo 11 was the fifth manned Apollo mission, and was the first to land on the Moon.
EN_01354825_0085 IMA
Buzz Aldrin's footprint on the Moon, Apollo 11 mission, July 1969. Boot-print of US astronaut Buzz Aldrin in the lunar soil. The Apollo 11 Lunar Module, code named Eagle, with Neil Armstrong and Buzz Aldrin on board, landed in the Sea of Tranquillity on 20 July 1969. Apollo 11 was the fifth manned Apollo mission, and was the first to land on the Moon.
EN_01354825_0086 IMA
Astronaut with Lunar Roving Vehicle on the Moon, 1970s. The LRV or Moon Buggy was a battery-powered four-wheeled rover used on the Moon in the last three missions of the American Apollo programme in 1971 and 1972.
EN_01354825_0087 IMA
The Rover is dwarfed by a giant rock on the lunar surface, Apollo 17 mission, December 1972. US astronauts Eugene Cernan and Harrison Schmitt collected samples and drove the Lunar Roving Vehicle (Rover) on the Moon. Apollo 17 was the last Apollo Moon landing mission.
EN_01354825_0088 IMA
Astronaut Charles Duke at the Descartes landing site, Apollo 16 mission, April 1972. Charles Duke collecting lunar samples on the surface of the Moon, with the Lunar Roving Vehicle, on the rim of Plum crater, in the distance.
EN_01354825_0089 IMA
Astronaut with Lunar Roving Vehicle on the Moon, 1970s. The LRV or Moon Buggy was a battery-powered four-wheeled rover used on the Moon in the last three missions of the American Apollo programme in 1971 and 1972.
EN_01354825_0090 IMA
Astronaut Charles Duke at the Descartes landing site, Apollo 16 mission, April 1972. Charles Duke collecting lunar samples on the surface of the Moon, with the Lunar Roving Vehicle, on the rim of Plum crater, in the distance.
EN_01354825_0091 IMA
Buzz Aldrin carries out an experiment on the lunar surface, Apollo II mission, July 1969. Astronaut Edwin "Buzz" Aldrin (b1930) walks on the Moon carrying equipment for scientific research. The Apollo 11 Lunar Module, code named Eagle, with US astronauts Neil Armstrong and Buzz Aldrin on board, landed in the Sea of Tranquillity on 20 July 1969. Apollo 11 was the fifth manned Apollo mission, and was the first to land on the Moon.
EN_01354825_0092 IMA
Buzz Aldrin deploys solar wind collector on the surface of the Moon, Apollo 11 mission, July 1969. The Apollo 11 Lunar Module, code named Eagle, with US astronauts Neil Armstrong and Buzz Aldrin on board, landed in the Sea of Tranquillity on 20 July 1969. Apollo 11 was the fifth manned Apollo mission, and was the first to land on the Moon.
EN_01354825_0093 IMA
Eugene Cernan using the Rover on the lunar surface, Apollo 17 mission, December 1972. US astronauts Eugene Cernan and Harrison Schmitt collected samples and drove the Lunar Roving Vehicle at the Taurus-Littrow Landing Site on the Moon. Apollo 17 was the last Apollo Moon landing mission.
EN_01354825_0094 IMA
Buzz Aldrin sets up the seismic experiment, Apollo II mission, July 1969. Astronaut Buzz Aldrin on the lunar surface. The Apollo 11 Lunar Module, code named Eagle, with US astronauts Neil Armstrong and Buzz Aldrin on board, landed in the Sea of Tranquillity on 20 July 1969. Apollo 11 was the fifth manned Apollo mission, and was the first to land on the Moon.
EN_01354825_0095 IMA
Harrison Schmitt collects lunar rake samples, Apollo 17 mission, December 1972. US astronaut Harrison Schmitt (born 1935), the 12th man to walk on the Moon, was also the first geologist to set foot on the lunar surface.
EN_01354825_0096 IMA
Astronaut John Young on the lunar surface, Apollo 16 mission, 21 April 1972. Commander John Young performing the first Apollo 16 Spacewalk at the Apollo Lunar Surface Experiments Package (ALSEP) deployment site, Descartes landing site. The lunar surface drill is just behind and to the right, rack and bore stems (left), with the three-sensor Lunar Surface Magnetometer beyond. The dark object in the right background is the Radioisotope Thermoelectric Generator (RTG). Between the RTG and the drill is the Heat Flow Experiment.
EN_01354825_0097 IMA
The Moon, Apollo II mission, July 1969. The Full Moon seen from the Apollo 11 spacecraft. Visible features include the Mare Crisium, and the Mare Tranquilitatis (Sea of Tranquillity), Apollo 11's landing site. Apollo 11 was the fifth manned Apollo mission, and was the first to land on the Moon. The Lunar Module, code named Eagle, with US astronauts Neil Armstrong and Buzz Aldrin on board, landed in the Sea of Tranquillity on 20 July 1969.
EN_01354825_0098 IMA
Buzz Aldrin near the leg of the Lunar Module on the Moon, Apollo 11 mission, July 1969. The Apollo 11 Lunar Module, code named Eagle, with US astronauts Neil Armstrong and Buzz Aldrin on board, landed in the Sea of Tranquillity on 20 July 1969. Apollo 11 was the fifth manned Apollo mission, and was the first to land on the Moon.
EN_01354825_0099 IMA
Buzz Aldrin by the Lunar Module on the surface of the Moon, Apollo II mission, July 1969. Astronaut Edwin "Buzz" Aldrin (b1930) walking on the Moon. The Apollo 11 Lunar Module, code named Eagle, with US astronauts Neil Armstrong and Buzz Aldrin on board, landed in the Sea of Tranquillity on 20 July 1969. Apollo 11 was the fifth manned Apollo mission, and was the first to land on the Moon.
EN_01354825_0100 IMA
Lunar Module 'Antares' at the Fra Mauro crater landing site on the Moon, Apollo 14 mission, February 1971. Apollo 14 was the third manned mission in NASA's Apollo programme to land on the Moon. US astronauts Alan Shepard and Edgar Mitchell collected. Shepard hit two golf balls on the lunar surface with a makeshift club he had brought with him.
EN_01354825_0101 IMA
Lunar Module above the Moon, Apollo 16 mission, April 1972. Lunar landing craft photographed from the Command Module. The three primary objectives of the mission were: to inspect, survey, and sample materials and surface features at a selected landing site in the Descartes region; emplace and activate surface experiments; and conduct in-flight experiments and photographic tasks from lunar orbit. Additional objectives included performance of experiments requiring zero gravity and engineering evaluation of spacecraft and equipment.
EN_01354825_0102 IMA
Astronaut John Young on the lunar surface, Apollo 16 mission, 21 April 1972. Commander John Young performing the first Apollo 16 Spacewalk at the Apollo Lunar Surface Experiments Package (ALSEP) deployment site, Descartes landing site. The lunar surface drill is just behind and to the right, rack and bore stems (left), with the three-sensor Lunar Surface Magnetometer beyond. The dark object in the right background is the Radioisotope Thermoelectric Generator (RTG). Between the RTG and the drill is the Heat Flow Experiment.
EN_01354825_0103 IMA
Space Shuttle - artist's concept of interior, 1980s. The Space Shuttle program, (official name, Space Transportation System or STS), was the fourth human spaceflight program carried out by the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA), which accomplished routine Earth-to-orbit transport for crew and cargo between 1981 and 2011.
EN_01354825_0104 IMA
Plaque left on the Moon, Apollo II mission, July 1969. Inscription on part of the 'Eagle'. The Apollo 11 Lunar Module, code named Eagle, with US astronauts Neil Armstrong and Buzz Aldrin on board, landed in the Sea of Tranquillity on 20 July 1969. Apollo 11 was the fifth manned Apollo mission, and was the first to land on the Moon. They left behind a plaque on the leg of the Lunar Module's descent stage, which reads: 'Here men from the planet Earth first set foot upon the Moon, July 1969, A.D. We came in peace for all mankind.'
EN_01354825_0105 IMA
Skylab Space Station cluster seen from Command Module 3, 1973. The Skylab space station first launched in May 1973, and was occupied in succession by three teams of three crewmembers. These crews orbited the Earth and performed nearly 300 experiments. The Skylab 3 mission began on 28 July and ended on 25 September 1973.
EN_01354825_0106 IMA
Simulation showing the separation of the component parts of the Apollo 11 spacecraft, 1969. Illustration of the removal of the Command Module and the Lunar Module from the 3rd stage of the Saturn V launch vehicle. Apollo 11 was the fifth manned Apollo mission, and was the first to land on the Moon.
EN_01354825_0107 IMA
Manipulator arm deployed during the second Space Shuttle flight, November 1981. The 'Canadarm' or Shuttle Remote Manipulator System (SRMS) is flown in space for the first time. It comprised a series of robotic arms that were used on the Space Shuttle orbiters to deploy, manoeuvre and capture payloads.
EN_01354825_0108 IMA
Module pilot David Scott emerging from Apollo 9 spacecraft, 6 March 1969. Apollo 9 Command/Service Modules (CSM) nicknamed 'Gumdrop', and Lunar Module (LM), nicknamed 'Spider' are shown docked together as Command Module pilot David R Scott stands in the open hatch. Astronaut Russell L Schweickart, Lunar Module pilot, took this photograph of Scott during EVA (Extravehicular activity). Inside the lunar module was Apollo 9 commander Jim McDivitt. The crew tested the orbital rendezvous and docking procedures that made the lunar landings possible.
EN_01354825_0109 IMA
Last view of Skylab, 1974. The Skylab space station first launched in May 1973, and was occupied in succession by three teams of three crewmembers. These crews orbited the Earth and performed nearly 300 experiments. The final mission started on 16 November 1973 and the crew was recovered on 8 February 1974 after 84 days in space. The space station's orbit decayed faster than expected, due to intense solar activity heating up Earth's atmosphere. In July 1979, Skylab reached Earth, falling in pieces in the small town of Esperance, Australia.
EN_01354825_0110 IMA
Command and supply capsule, Apollo 17 mission, December 1972. Apollo 17 was the last Apollo Moon landing mission.
EN_01354825_0111 IMA
Space Shuttle and space station above Earth, artist's impression.
EN_01354825_0112 IMA
Space Shuttle atop Boeing 747, Kennedy Space Center, Merritt Island, Florida, USA, 1980s. The Space Shuttle program, (official name, Space Transportation System or STS), was the fourth human spaceflight program carried out by the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA), which accomplished routine Earth-to-orbit transport for crew and cargo between 1981 and 2011.
EN_01354825_0113 IMA
Lift off, second Space Shuttle flight, Kennedy Space Center, Merritt Island, Florida, USA, November 1981. STS-2 was the second Space Shuttle mission conducted by NASA, and the second flight of the orbiter 'Columbia'. The Space Shuttle program, (official name, Space Transportation System or STS), was the fourth human spaceflight program carried out by the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA), which accomplished routine Earth-to-orbit transport for crew and cargo between 1981 and 2011.
EN_01354825_0114 IMA
Huge external fuel tank, second Space Shuttle flight, Kennedy Space Center, Merritt Island, Florida, USA, 1981. STS-2 was the second Space Shuttle mission conducted by the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA), and the second flight of the orbiter 'Columbia'. The Space Shuttle program, (official name, Space Transportation System or STS), was NASA's fourth human spaceflight program, and provided routine Earth-to-orbit transport for crew and cargo between 1981 and 2011.
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Crawler moving Space Shuttle to launch complex 39, Kennedy Space Center, Merritt Island, Florida, USA, 1980s. Crawler-transporters, formally known as the Missile Crawler Transporter Facilities, were a pair of tracked vehicles used to transport spacecraft from NASA's Vehicle Assembly Building (VAB) along the Crawlerway to Launch Complex 39. They transported Space Shuttles from 1981 to 2011.
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Space Shuttle on launch pad, Kennedy Space Center, Merritt Island, Florida, USA, 1980s. The Space Shuttle program, (official name, Space Transportation System or STS), was the fourth human spaceflight program carried out by the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA), which accomplished routine Earth-to-orbit transport for crew and cargo between 1981 and 2011.
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Space Shuttle Orbiter 'Columbia' on Boeing 747 Shuttle Carrier, 1980s. The 'Columbia' Orbiter operated between 1981 and 2003.
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Space Shuttle Orbiter 'Discovery' landing at Kennedy Space Center, Merritt Island, Florida, USA, 1980s. 'Discovery' was in operation between 1984 and 2011.
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Space Shuttle Orbiter on launch pad on launch pad, Kennedy Space Center, Merritt Island, Florida, USA, 1980s. The Space Shuttle program, (official name, Space Transportation System or STS), was the fourth human spaceflight program carried out by the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA), which accomplished routine Earth-to-orbit transport for crew and cargo between 1981 and 2011.
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Space Shuttle 'Enterprise' landing at Stansted, Essex, United Kingdom, 5 June 1983. The US space shuttle 'Enterprise' and its carrier aircraft, a Boeing 747, touched down at Stansted Airport as part of a European tour. Over 200,000 people came to see the 'Enterprise' which was named after the famous command of Captain James T Kirk, following a campaign by "Star Trek" fans.
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Saturnian System from Voyager 1, c1980s. The Voyager 1 space probe was launched by NASA on 5 September 1977, 16 days after its twin, Voyager 2. The purpose of the Voyager programme was to study the outer Solar System.
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Dione, one of Saturn's moons. View of Dione, showing impact craters.
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The planet Saturn with moons Tethys and Dione. View of Saturn showing shadows cast by its rings.
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Saturn's cloud deck. There are three different layers of clouds, or clouddecks, in Saturn's atmosphere. The first is made of ammonia clouds, the second is made of ammonium hydrosulfide clouds - a combination of ammonia and sulphur - and the third clouddeck is made of water clouds.
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Saturn and its moon Dione, seen from the Voyager 2 spacecraft.
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Two-image mosaic of Saturn's Rings, seen from Voyager 1 spacecraft, 1980. Computer-assembled two-image mosaic of Saturn's rings, taken by NASA's Voyager 1 on 6 November 1980 at a range of 8 million kilometers (5 million miles). Approximately 95 individual concentric features in the rings can be seen. The extraordinarily complex structure of the rings is easily seen across the entire span of the ring system. The ring structure, once thought to be produced by the gravitational interaction between Saturn's satellites and the orbit of ring particles, has now been found to be too complex for this explanation alone. The 14th satellite of Saturn, discovered by Voyager 1, is seen just inside the narrow F-ring, which is less than 150 kilometers (93 miles wide).
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Saturn from 27 million miles, seen from Voyager 2 spacecraft.
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Saturn's rings, range 717,000 km, seen from Voyager 1 spacecraft.

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