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Miejsce, gdzie Amerykanie testowali broń chemiczną (14)

! EN_01348692_0001 NYT
An undated photo provided by the National Archives and Records Administration shows an apparatus for testing peripheral vision through a gas mask. One hundred years after the end of World War I, the Army Corps of Engineers is still cleaning up the relics of experiments that helped develop chemical weapons to counter the Germans' gas attacks. (National Archives and Records Administration via The New York Times) -- FOR EDITORIAL USE ONLY
FOR EDITORIAL USE ONLY MINIMALNA CENA 100USD!!!
! EN_01348692_0002 NYT
An undated photo provided by the National Archives and Records Administration shows soldiers in protective suits at the American University Experiment Station in Washington, D.C. One hundred years after the end of World War I, the Army Corps of Engineers is still cleaning up the relics of experiments that helped develop chemical weapons to counter the Germans' gas attacks. (National Archives and Records Administration via The New York Times) -- FOR EDITORIAL USE ONLY
FOR EDITORIAL USE ONLY MINIMALNA CENA 100USD!!!
! EN_01348692_0003 NYT
An undated photo provided by the National Archives and Records Administration shows an aerial view of the American University Experiment Station, established in Washington, D.C., in 1917 for developing chemical weapons and protective gear for chemical warfare. One hundred years after the end of World War I, the Army Corps of Engineers is still cleaning up the relics of experiments that helped develop chemical weapons to counter the Germans' gas attacks. (National Archives and Records Administration via The New York Times) -- FOR EDITORIAL USE ONLY
FOR EDITORIAL USE ONLY MINIMALNA CENA 100USD!!!
! EN_01348692_0004 NYT
An undated photo provided by the National Archives and Records Administration shows soldiers testing gas masks in a laboratory at the American University Experiment Station in Washington, D.C. One hundred years after the end of World War I, the Army Corps of Engineers is still cleaning up the relics of experiments that helped develop chemical weapons to counter the Germans' gas attacks. (National Archives and Records Administration via The New York Times) -- FOR EDITORIAL USE ONLY
FOR EDITORIAL USE ONLY MINIMALNA CENA 100USD!!!
! EN_01348692_0005 NYT
An undated photo provided by the National Archives and Records Administration shows a soldier testing a flamethrower at the American University Experiment Station in Washington, D.C. One hundred years after the end of World War I, the Army Corps of Engineers is still cleaning up the relics of experiments that helped develop chemical weapons to counter the Germans' gas attacks. (National Archives and Records Administration via The New York Times) -- FOR EDITORIAL USE ONLY
FOR EDITORIAL USE ONLY MINIMALNA CENA 100USD!!!
! EN_01348692_0006 NYT
An undated photo provided by the National Archives and Records Administration shows soldiers wearing gas masks in the test trenches that were used for experiments. One hundred years after the end of World War I, the Army Corps of Engineers is still cleaning up the relics of experiments that helped develop chemical weapons to counter the Germans' gas attacks. (National Archives and Records Administration via The New York Times) -- FOR EDITORIAL USE ONLY
FOR EDITORIAL USE ONLY MINIMALNA CENA 100USD!!!
! EN_01348692_0007 NYT
An undated photo provided by the National Archives and Records Administration shows a test explosion of a shrapnel bomb at the American University's Experiment Station in Washington, D.C. One hundred years after the end of World War I, the Army Corps of Engineers is still cleaning up the relics of experiments that helped develop chemical weapons to counter the Germans' gas attacks. (National Archives and Records Administration via The New York Times) -- FOR EDITORIAL USE ONLY
FOR EDITORIAL USE ONLY MINIMALNA CENA 100USD!!!
! EN_01348692_0008 NYT
An undated photo provided by the National Archives and Records Administration shows a soldier's forearm comparing different blister agents. One hundred years after the end of World War I, the Army Corps of Engineers is still cleaning up the relics of experiments that helped develop chemical weapons to counter the Germans' gas attacks. (National Archives and Records Administration via The New York Times) -- FOR EDITORIAL USE ONLY
FOR EDITORIAL USE ONLY MINIMALNA CENA 100USD!!!
! EN_01348692_0013 NYT
Elliot Gerson, a resident of the Spring Valley neighborhood, enters a concrete bunker that remains on his property from the World War I experiments, in Washington, D.C., Sept. 11, 2018. One hundred years after the end of World War I, the Army Corps of Engineers is still cleaning up the relics of experiments that helped develop chemical weapons to counter the Germans' gas attacks. (Andrew Mangum/The New York Times)
MINIMALNA CENA 100USD!!!
! EN_01348692_0014 NYT
One of the World War I concrete bunkers in the Spring Valley neighborhood of Washington, D.C., Sept. 11, 2018. One hundred years after the end of World War I, the Army Corps of Engineers is still cleaning up the relics of experiments that helped develop chemical weapons to counter the Germans' gas attacks. (Andrew Mangum/The New York Times)
MINIMALNA CENA 100USD!!!
! EN_01348692_0009 NYT
American University's recreational complex near the Spring Valley neighborhood, which was built on top of a World War I-era chemical weapons experiment station, in Washington, D.C., Sept. 6, 2018. One hundred years after the end of World War I, the Army Corps of Engineers is still cleaning up the relics of experiments that helped develop chemical weapons to counter the Germans' gas attacks. (Andrew Mangum/The New York Times)
MINIMALNA CENA 100USD!!!
! EN_01348692_0010 NYT
The unoccupied residence of the American University president sits beside a lot where a home was demolished in 2012 because of contamination, in the Spring Valley neighborhood of Washington, D.C., Sept. 6, 2018. One hundred years after the end of World War I, the Army Corps of Engineers is still cleaning up the relics of experiments that helped develop chemical weapons to counter the Germans' gas attacks. (Andrew Mangum/The New York Times)
MINIMALNA CENA 100USD!!!
! EN_01348692_0011 NYT
Andrew Fedetz, a contractor for the Army Corps of Engineers, wears a newly developed "man portable vector" that can help distinguish between harmless buried objects and those that are potentially hazardous, near the Dalecarlia Reservoir, in Washington, D.C., Sept. 6, 2018. One hundred years after the end of World War I, the Army Corps of Engineers is still cleaning up the relics of experiments that helped develop chemical weapons to counter the Germans' gas attacks. (Andrew Mangum/The New York Times)
MINIMALNA CENA 100USD!!!
! EN_01348692_0012 NYT
Jake Vera, left, and Andrew Fedetz, contract surveyors with the Army Corps of Engineers, use a magnetometer to scan the ground in the Dalecarlia Woods area of Washington, D.C., Sept. 6, 2018. One hundred years after the end of World War I, the Army Corps of Engineers is still cleaning up the relics of experiments that helped develop chemical weapons to counter the Germans' gas attacks. (Andrew Mangum/The New York Times) ?
MINIMALNA CENA 100USD!!!
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