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Odnaleziono szkielet dziecka z 5 wieku (5)

EN_01344064_0001 FER
Ferrari Press Agency Ref 9741 Vampire1 14/10/2018 See Ferrari text Picture MUST credit : PHOTO COURTESY OF DAVID PICKEL/STANFORD UNIVERSITY A child' buried more than 1,500 had been weighed down, over fears it would rise from the dead like a vampire.The discovery of the 10-year-old's body at an ancient Roman site in Italy suggests measures were taken to prevent it, possibly infected with malaria, from rising from the dead and spreading disease to the living.The skull was discovered with a rock intentionally inserted into the mouth. Researchers believe the stone may have been placed there as part of a funeral ritual designed to contain disease - and the body itself.The skeletal remains dating from he 5th Century AD were uncovered by archaeologists from the University of Arizona and Stanford University, along with archaeologists from Italy.The discovery of this unusual, so-called "vampire burial" was made over the summer in the commune of Lugnano in Teverina in the Italian region of Umbria, where UA archaeologist David Soren has overseen archaeological excavations since 1987.Soren, a Regents' Professor in the UA School of Anthropology and Department of Religious Studies and Classics. Said "I've never seen anything like it. It's extremely eerie and weird."Locally, they're calling it the 'Vampire of Lugnano.'"he discovery was made at La Necropoli dei Bambini, or the Cemetery of the Babies, which dates to the mid-fifth century when a deadly malaria outbreak swept the area, killing many vulnerable babies and small children. The bodies of the young victims were buried at the site of an abandoned Roman villa that was originally constructed at the end of the first century B.C.Until now, archaeologists believed the cemetery was designated specifically for infants, toddlers and unborn fetuses.In previous excavations of more than 50 burials, a three-year-old girl was the oldest child found.The discovery of the 10-year-old, whose age was determined based on dental development
EN_01344064_0002 FER
Ferrari Press Agency Ref 9741 Vampire1 14/10/2018 See Ferrari text Picture MUST credit : PHOTO COURTESY OF DAVID PICKEL/STANFORD UNIVERSITY A child' buried more than 1,500 had been weighed down, over fears it would rise from the dead like a vampire.The discovery of the 10-year-old's body at an ancient Roman site in Italy suggests measures were taken to prevent it, possibly infected with malaria, from rising from the dead and spreading disease to the living.The skull was discovered with a rock intentionally inserted into the mouth. Researchers believe the stone may have been placed there as part of a funeral ritual designed to contain disease - and the body itself.The skeletal remains dating from he 5th Century AD were uncovered by archaeologists from the University of Arizona and Stanford University, along with archaeologists from Italy.The discovery of this unusual, so-called "vampire burial" was made over the summer in the commune of Lugnano in Teverina in the Italian region of Umbria, where UA archaeologist David Soren has overseen archaeological excavations since 1987.Soren, a Regents' Professor in the UA School of Anthropology and Department of Religious Studies and Classics. Said "I've never seen anything like it. It's extremely eerie and weird."Locally, they're calling it the 'Vampire of Lugnano.'"he discovery was made at La Necropoli dei Bambini, or the Cemetery of the Babies, which dates to the mid-fifth century when a deadly malaria outbreak swept the area, killing many vulnerable babies and small children. The bodies of the young victims were buried at the site of an abandoned Roman villa that was originally constructed at the end of the first century B.C.Until now, archaeologists believed the cemetery was designated specifically for infants, toddlers and unborn fetuses.In previous excavations of more than 50 burials, a three-year-old girl was the oldest child found.The discovery of the 10-year-old, whose age was determined based on dental development
EN_01344064_0003 FER
Ferrari Press Agency Ref 9741 Vampire1 14/10/2018 See Ferrari text Picture MUST credit : PHOTO COURTESY OF DAVID PICKEL/STANFORD UNIVERSITY A child' buried more than 1,500 had been weighed down, over fears it would rise from the dead like a vampire.The discovery of the 10-year-old's body at an ancient Roman site in Italy suggests measures were taken to prevent it, possibly infected with malaria, from rising from the dead and spreading disease to the living.The skull was discovered with a rock intentionally inserted into the mouth. Researchers believe the stone may have been placed there as part of a funeral ritual designed to contain disease - and the body itself.The skeletal remains dating from he 5th Century AD were uncovered by archaeologists from the University of Arizona and Stanford University, along with archaeologists from Italy.The discovery of this unusual, so-called "vampire burial" was made over the summer in the commune of Lugnano in Teverina in the Italian region of Umbria, where UA archaeologist David Soren has overseen archaeological excavations since 1987.Soren, a Regents' Professor in the UA School of Anthropology and Department of Religious Studies and Classics. Said "I've never seen anything like it. It's extremely eerie and weird."Locally, they're calling it the 'Vampire of Lugnano.'"he discovery was made at La Necropoli dei Bambini, or the Cemetery of the Babies, which dates to the mid-fifth century when a deadly malaria outbreak swept the area, killing many vulnerable babies and small children. The bodies of the young victims were buried at the site of an abandoned Roman villa that was originally constructed at the end of the first century B.C.Until now, archaeologists believed the cemetery was designated specifically for infants, toddlers and unborn fetuses.In previous excavations of more than 50 burials, a three-year-old girl was the oldest child found.The discovery of the 10-year-old, whose age was determined based on dental development
EN_01344064_0004 COV
Archaeologists found the remains of a 10-year-old child with a stone inserted into his or her mouth at a fifth-century Italian cemetery. They think the stone was meant to keep the child from rising from the dead and spreading malaria to the living. The discovery of a 10-year-old's body at an ancient Roman site in Italy suggests measures were taken to prevent the child, possibly infected with malaria, from rising from the dead and spreading disease to the living. The skeletal remains, uncovered by archaeologists from the University of Arizona and Stanford University, along with archaeologists from Italy, included a skull with a rock intentionally inserted into the mouth. Researchers believe the stone may have been placed there as part of a funeral ritual designed to contain disease — and the body itself. The discovery of this unusual, so-called "vampire burial" was made over the summer in the commune of Lugnano in Teverina in the Italian region of Umbria, where UA archaeologist David Soren has overseen archaeological excavations since 1987. "I've never seen anything like it. It's extremely eerie and weird," said Soren, a Regents' Professor in the UA School of Anthropology and Department of Religious Studies and Classics. "Locally, they're calling it the 'Vampire of Lugnano.'" The discovery was made at La Necropoli dei Bambini, or the Cemetery of the Babies, which dates to the mid-fifth century when a deadly malaria outbreak swept the area, killing many vulnerable babies and small children. The bodies of the young victims were buried at the site of an abandoned Roman villa that was originally constructed at the end of the first century B.C. Until now, archaeologists believed the cemetery was designated specifically for infants, toddlers and unborn fetuses; in previous excavations of more than 50 burials, a 3-year-old girl was the oldest child found. The discovery of the 10-year-old, whose age was determined based on dental development but whose sex is unkno
=MANDATORY CREDIT: David Pickel/Stanford University/Cover Images. Only for use in this story. Editorial Use Only. No stock, books, advertising or merchandising without photographer's permission
EN_01344064_0005 COV
Archaeologists found the remains of a 10-year-old child with a stone inserted into his or her mouth at a fifth-century Italian cemetery. They think the stone was meant to keep the child from rising from the dead and spreading malaria to the living. The discovery of a 10-year-old's body at an ancient Roman site in Italy suggests measures were taken to prevent the child, possibly infected with malaria, from rising from the dead and spreading disease to the living. The skeletal remains, uncovered by archaeologists from the University of Arizona and Stanford University, along with archaeologists from Italy, included a skull with a rock intentionally inserted into the mouth. Researchers believe the stone may have been placed there as part of a funeral ritual designed to contain disease — and the body itself. The discovery of this unusual, so-called "vampire burial" was made over the summer in the commune of Lugnano in Teverina in the Italian region of Umbria, where UA archaeologist David Soren has overseen archaeological excavations since 1987. "I've never seen anything like it. It's extremely eerie and weird," said Soren, a Regents' Professor in the UA School of Anthropology and Department of Religious Studies and Classics. "Locally, they're calling it the 'Vampire of Lugnano.'" The discovery was made at La Necropoli dei Bambini, or the Cemetery of the Babies, which dates to the mid-fifth century when a deadly malaria outbreak swept the area, killing many vulnerable babies and small children. The bodies of the young victims were buried at the site of an abandoned Roman villa that was originally constructed at the end of the first century B.C. Until now, archaeologists believed the cemetery was designated specifically for infants, toddlers and unborn fetuses; in previous excavations of more than 50 burials, a 3-year-old girl was the oldest child found. The discovery of the 10-year-old, whose age was determined based on dental development but whose sex is unkno
=MANDATORY CREDIT: David Pickel/Stanford University/Cover Images. Only for use in this story. Editorial Use Only. No stock, books, advertising or merchandising without photographer's permission
Rocznice 2018 Na wyłączność