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Drukarka 3D wydrukuje szkolny lunch (13)

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School dinners have gone through many transformations over the years but none quite like this; St Helen’s Primary in Canning Town, London is aiming to use lunchtime to whet young people’s appetites for STEM (science, technology, engineering and maths) careers, as it sets out to 3D print pupils’ lunches this week. If new research by The Big Bang Fair, the UK’s largest event aimed at inspiring young people into STEM, is anything to go on, pupils would very much prefer geometric fish & chips, and cauliflower cogs and gears to the usual fare. A study conducted into their opinions of the cutting edge technology found 71% of 11-16 year-olds think it’s crucial to have access to this kind of technology at school – not just in science labs and classrooms, but the school gym, playground and even the canteen, with 40% believing it will enable them to learn something while they eat and almost a fifth (18%) said it would help make healthy food more appetising. The study into youngsters’ attitudes to 3D printing also revealed their open-mindedness and optimism about the vast possibilities this technology holds: one fifth (20%) believe we will all have 3D printers in our homes as the norm within 3-4 years, and two thirds (67%) of kids believe it will be the norm within 10 years. And so this week, dinner ladies will be working alongside engineers to serve up a vision of the (possible) school dinners of the not-too-distant future. So what’s on the menu? MAIN DISH: · GEOMETRIC FISH & CHIPS – Hexagonal beans, cod and potato SIDES: · CAULIFLOWER COGS - Mechanical cogs of cauliflower purée · HUMMUS & GUACAMOLE LIZARD - Hummus exoskeleton and avocado scales · FIBONACCI SPIRAL SQUASH - Butternut squash Fibonacci spiral with tomato & olive oil · SPACE BROCCOLI - Three dimensional broccoli star DESSERT: · PI OF THE DAY - Fruit and yoghurt Interestingly, the majority (71%) believe it’s important to access cutting edge technology such as 3D printin
=EDITORIAL USE ONLY. MATERIALS ONLY TO BE USED IN CONJUNCTION WITH EDITORIAL STORY. COVER IMAGES DOES NOT CLAIM ANY OWNERSHIP OF THE MATERIALS. IMAGE/VIDEO COPYRIGHT REMAINS WITH THE PHOTOGRAPHER AND/OR SUPPLIER.
EN_01343619_0002 COV
School dinners have gone through many transformations over the years but none quite like this; St Helen’s Primary in Canning Town, London is aiming to use lunchtime to whet young people’s appetites for STEM (science, technology, engineering and maths) careers, as it sets out to 3D print pupils’ lunches this week. If new research by The Big Bang Fair, the UK’s largest event aimed at inspiring young people into STEM, is anything to go on, pupils would very much prefer geometric fish & chips, and cauliflower cogs and gears to the usual fare. A study conducted into their opinions of the cutting edge technology found 71% of 11-16 year-olds think it’s crucial to have access to this kind of technology at school – not just in science labs and classrooms, but the school gym, playground and even the canteen, with 40% believing it will enable them to learn something while they eat and almost a fifth (18%) said it would help make healthy food more appetising. The study into youngsters’ attitudes to 3D printing also revealed their open-mindedness and optimism about the vast possibilities this technology holds: one fifth (20%) believe we will all have 3D printers in our homes as the norm within 3-4 years, and two thirds (67%) of kids believe it will be the norm within 10 years. And so this week, dinner ladies will be working alongside engineers to serve up a vision of the (possible) school dinners of the not-too-distant future. So what’s on the menu? MAIN DISH: · GEOMETRIC FISH & CHIPS – Hexagonal beans, cod and potato SIDES: · CAULIFLOWER COGS - Mechanical cogs of cauliflower purée · HUMMUS & GUACAMOLE LIZARD - Hummus exoskeleton and avocado scales · FIBONACCI SPIRAL SQUASH - Butternut squash Fibonacci spiral with tomato & olive oil · SPACE BROCCOLI - Three dimensional broccoli star DESSERT: · PI OF THE DAY - Fruit and yoghurt Interestingly, the majority (71%) believe it’s important to access cutting edge technology such as 3D printin
=EDITORIAL USE ONLY. MATERIALS ONLY TO BE USED IN CONJUNCTION WITH EDITORIAL STORY. COVER IMAGES DOES NOT CLAIM ANY OWNERSHIP OF THE MATERIALS. IMAGE/VIDEO COPYRIGHT REMAINS WITH THE PHOTOGRAPHER AND/OR SUPPLIER.
EN_01343619_0003 COV
School dinners have gone through many transformations over the years but none quite like this; St Helen’s Primary in Canning Town, London is aiming to use lunchtime to whet young people’s appetites for STEM (science, technology, engineering and maths) careers, as it sets out to 3D print pupils’ lunches this week. If new research by The Big Bang Fair, the UK’s largest event aimed at inspiring young people into STEM, is anything to go on, pupils would very much prefer geometric fish & chips, and cauliflower cogs and gears to the usual fare. A study conducted into their opinions of the cutting edge technology found 71% of 11-16 year-olds think it’s crucial to have access to this kind of technology at school – not just in science labs and classrooms, but the school gym, playground and even the canteen, with 40% believing it will enable them to learn something while they eat and almost a fifth (18%) said it would help make healthy food more appetising. The study into youngsters’ attitudes to 3D printing also revealed their open-mindedness and optimism about the vast possibilities this technology holds: one fifth (20%) believe we will all have 3D printers in our homes as the norm within 3-4 years, and two thirds (67%) of kids believe it will be the norm within 10 years. And so this week, dinner ladies will be working alongside engineers to serve up a vision of the (possible) school dinners of the not-too-distant future. So what’s on the menu? MAIN DISH: · GEOMETRIC FISH & CHIPS – Hexagonal beans, cod and potato SIDES: · CAULIFLOWER COGS - Mechanical cogs of cauliflower purée · HUMMUS & GUACAMOLE LIZARD - Hummus exoskeleton and avocado scales · FIBONACCI SPIRAL SQUASH - Butternut squash Fibonacci spiral with tomato & olive oil · SPACE BROCCOLI - Three dimensional broccoli star DESSERT: · PI OF THE DAY - Fruit and yoghurt Interestingly, the majority (71%) believe it’s important to access cutting edge technology such as 3D printin
=EDITORIAL USE ONLY. MATERIALS ONLY TO BE USED IN CONJUNCTION WITH EDITORIAL STORY. COVER IMAGES DOES NOT CLAIM ANY OWNERSHIP OF THE MATERIALS. IMAGE/VIDEO COPYRIGHT REMAINS WITH THE PHOTOGRAPHER AND/OR SUPPLIER.
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School dinners have gone through many transformations over the years but none quite like this; St Helen’s Primary in Canning Town, London is aiming to use lunchtime to whet young people’s appetites for STEM (science, technology, engineering and maths) careers, as it sets out to 3D print pupils’ lunches this week. If new research by The Big Bang Fair, the UK’s largest event aimed at inspiring young people into STEM, is anything to go on, pupils would very much prefer geometric fish & chips, and cauliflower cogs and gears to the usual fare. A study conducted into their opinions of the cutting edge technology found 71% of 11-16 year-olds think it’s crucial to have access to this kind of technology at school – not just in science labs and classrooms, but the school gym, playground and even the canteen, with 40% believing it will enable them to learn something while they eat and almost a fifth (18%) said it would help make healthy food more appetising. The study into youngsters’ attitudes to 3D printing also revealed their open-mindedness and optimism about the vast possibilities this technology holds: one fifth (20%) believe we will all have 3D printers in our homes as the norm within 3-4 years, and two thirds (67%) of kids believe it will be the norm within 10 years. And so this week, dinner ladies will be working alongside engineers to serve up a vision of the (possible) school dinners of the not-too-distant future. So what’s on the menu? MAIN DISH: · GEOMETRIC FISH & CHIPS – Hexagonal beans, cod and potato SIDES: · CAULIFLOWER COGS - Mechanical cogs of cauliflower purée · HUMMUS & GUACAMOLE LIZARD - Hummus exoskeleton and avocado scales · FIBONACCI SPIRAL SQUASH - Butternut squash Fibonacci spiral with tomato & olive oil · SPACE BROCCOLI - Three dimensional broccoli star DESSERT: · PI OF THE DAY - Fruit and yoghurt Interestingly, the majority (71%) believe it’s important to access cutting edge technology such as 3D printin
=EDITORIAL USE ONLY. MATERIALS ONLY TO BE USED IN CONJUNCTION WITH EDITORIAL STORY. COVER IMAGES DOES NOT CLAIM ANY OWNERSHIP OF THE MATERIALS. IMAGE/VIDEO COPYRIGHT REMAINS WITH THE PHOTOGRAPHER AND/OR SUPPLIER.
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School dinners have gone through many transformations over the years but none quite like this; St Helen’s Primary in Canning Town, London is aiming to use lunchtime to whet young people’s appetites for STEM (science, technology, engineering and maths) careers, as it sets out to 3D print pupils’ lunches this week. If new research by The Big Bang Fair, the UK’s largest event aimed at inspiring young people into STEM, is anything to go on, pupils would very much prefer geometric fish & chips, and cauliflower cogs and gears to the usual fare. A study conducted into their opinions of the cutting edge technology found 71% of 11-16 year-olds think it’s crucial to have access to this kind of technology at school – not just in science labs and classrooms, but the school gym, playground and even the canteen, with 40% believing it will enable them to learn something while they eat and almost a fifth (18%) said it would help make healthy food more appetising. The study into youngsters’ attitudes to 3D printing also revealed their open-mindedness and optimism about the vast possibilities this technology holds: one fifth (20%) believe we will all have 3D printers in our homes as the norm within 3-4 years, and two thirds (67%) of kids believe it will be the norm within 10 years. And so this week, dinner ladies will be working alongside engineers to serve up a vision of the (possible) school dinners of the not-too-distant future. So what’s on the menu? MAIN DISH: · GEOMETRIC FISH & CHIPS – Hexagonal beans, cod and potato SIDES: · CAULIFLOWER COGS - Mechanical cogs of cauliflower purée · HUMMUS & GUACAMOLE LIZARD - Hummus exoskeleton and avocado scales · FIBONACCI SPIRAL SQUASH - Butternut squash Fibonacci spiral with tomato & olive oil · SPACE BROCCOLI - Three dimensional broccoli star DESSERT: · PI OF THE DAY - Fruit and yoghurt Interestingly, the majority (71%) believe it’s important to access cutting edge technology such as 3D printin
=EDITORIAL USE ONLY. MATERIALS ONLY TO BE USED IN CONJUNCTION WITH EDITORIAL STORY. COVER IMAGES DOES NOT CLAIM ANY OWNERSHIP OF THE MATERIALS. IMAGE/VIDEO COPYRIGHT REMAINS WITH THE PHOTOGRAPHER AND/OR SUPPLIER.
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School dinners have gone through many transformations over the years but none quite like this; St Helen’s Primary in Canning Town, London is aiming to use lunchtime to whet young people’s appetites for STEM (science, technology, engineering and maths) careers, as it sets out to 3D print pupils’ lunches this week. If new research by The Big Bang Fair, the UK’s largest event aimed at inspiring young people into STEM, is anything to go on, pupils would very much prefer geometric fish & chips, and cauliflower cogs and gears to the usual fare. A study conducted into their opinions of the cutting edge technology found 71% of 11-16 year-olds think it’s crucial to have access to this kind of technology at school – not just in science labs and classrooms, but the school gym, playground and even the canteen, with 40% believing it will enable them to learn something while they eat and almost a fifth (18%) said it would help make healthy food more appetising. The study into youngsters’ attitudes to 3D printing also revealed their open-mindedness and optimism about the vast possibilities this technology holds: one fifth (20%) believe we will all have 3D printers in our homes as the norm within 3-4 years, and two thirds (67%) of kids believe it will be the norm within 10 years. And so this week, dinner ladies will be working alongside engineers to serve up a vision of the (possible) school dinners of the not-too-distant future. So what’s on the menu? MAIN DISH: · GEOMETRIC FISH & CHIPS – Hexagonal beans, cod and potato SIDES: · CAULIFLOWER COGS - Mechanical cogs of cauliflower purée · HUMMUS & GUACAMOLE LIZARD - Hummus exoskeleton and avocado scales · FIBONACCI SPIRAL SQUASH - Butternut squash Fibonacci spiral with tomato & olive oil · SPACE BROCCOLI - Three dimensional broccoli star DESSERT: · PI OF THE DAY - Fruit and yoghurt Interestingly, the majority (71%) believe it’s important to access cutting edge technology such as 3D printin
=EDITORIAL USE ONLY. MATERIALS ONLY TO BE USED IN CONJUNCTION WITH EDITORIAL STORY. COVER IMAGES DOES NOT CLAIM ANY OWNERSHIP OF THE MATERIALS. IMAGE/VIDEO COPYRIGHT REMAINS WITH THE PHOTOGRAPHER AND/OR SUPPLIER.
EN_01343619_0007 COV
School dinners have gone through many transformations over the years but none quite like this; St Helen’s Primary in Canning Town, London is aiming to use lunchtime to whet young people’s appetites for STEM (science, technology, engineering and maths) careers, as it sets out to 3D print pupils’ lunches this week. If new research by The Big Bang Fair, the UK’s largest event aimed at inspiring young people into STEM, is anything to go on, pupils would very much prefer geometric fish & chips, and cauliflower cogs and gears to the usual fare. A study conducted into their opinions of the cutting edge technology found 71% of 11-16 year-olds think it’s crucial to have access to this kind of technology at school – not just in science labs and classrooms, but the school gym, playground and even the canteen, with 40% believing it will enable them to learn something while they eat and almost a fifth (18%) said it would help make healthy food more appetising. The study into youngsters’ attitudes to 3D printing also revealed their open-mindedness and optimism about the vast possibilities this technology holds: one fifth (20%) believe we will all have 3D printers in our homes as the norm within 3-4 years, and two thirds (67%) of kids believe it will be the norm within 10 years. And so this week, dinner ladies will be working alongside engineers to serve up a vision of the (possible) school dinners of the not-too-distant future. So what’s on the menu? MAIN DISH: · GEOMETRIC FISH & CHIPS – Hexagonal beans, cod and potato SIDES: · CAULIFLOWER COGS - Mechanical cogs of cauliflower purée · HUMMUS & GUACAMOLE LIZARD - Hummus exoskeleton and avocado scales · FIBONACCI SPIRAL SQUASH - Butternut squash Fibonacci spiral with tomato & olive oil · SPACE BROCCOLI - Three dimensional broccoli star DESSERT: · PI OF THE DAY - Fruit and yoghurt Interestingly, the majority (71%) believe it’s important to access cutting edge technology such as 3D printin
=EDITORIAL USE ONLY. MATERIALS ONLY TO BE USED IN CONJUNCTION WITH EDITORIAL STORY. COVER IMAGES DOES NOT CLAIM ANY OWNERSHIP OF THE MATERIALS. IMAGE/VIDEO COPYRIGHT REMAINS WITH THE PHOTOGRAPHER AND/OR SUPPLIER.
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School dinners have gone through many transformations over the years but none quite like this; St Helen’s Primary in Canning Town, London is aiming to use lunchtime to whet young people’s appetites for STEM (science, technology, engineering and maths) careers, as it sets out to 3D print pupils’ lunches this week. If new research by The Big Bang Fair, the UK’s largest event aimed at inspiring young people into STEM, is anything to go on, pupils would very much prefer geometric fish & chips, and cauliflower cogs and gears to the usual fare. A study conducted into their opinions of the cutting edge technology found 71% of 11-16 year-olds think it’s crucial to have access to this kind of technology at school – not just in science labs and classrooms, but the school gym, playground and even the canteen, with 40% believing it will enable them to learn something while they eat and almost a fifth (18%) said it would help make healthy food more appetising. The study into youngsters’ attitudes to 3D printing also revealed their open-mindedness and optimism about the vast possibilities this technology holds: one fifth (20%) believe we will all have 3D printers in our homes as the norm within 3-4 years, and two thirds (67%) of kids believe it will be the norm within 10 years. And so this week, dinner ladies will be working alongside engineers to serve up a vision of the (possible) school dinners of the not-too-distant future. So what’s on the menu? MAIN DISH: · GEOMETRIC FISH & CHIPS – Hexagonal beans, cod and potato SIDES: · CAULIFLOWER COGS - Mechanical cogs of cauliflower purée · HUMMUS & GUACAMOLE LIZARD - Hummus exoskeleton and avocado scales · FIBONACCI SPIRAL SQUASH - Butternut squash Fibonacci spiral with tomato & olive oil · SPACE BROCCOLI - Three dimensional broccoli star DESSERT: · PI OF THE DAY - Fruit and yoghurt Interestingly, the majority (71%) believe it’s important to access cutting edge technology such as 3D printin
=EDITORIAL USE ONLY. MATERIALS ONLY TO BE USED IN CONJUNCTION WITH EDITORIAL STORY. COVER IMAGES DOES NOT CLAIM ANY OWNERSHIP OF THE MATERIALS. IMAGE/VIDEO COPYRIGHT REMAINS WITH THE PHOTOGRAPHER AND/OR SUPPLIER.
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School dinners have gone through many transformations over the years but none quite like this; St Helen’s Primary in Canning Town, London is aiming to use lunchtime to whet young people’s appetites for STEM (science, technology, engineering and maths) careers, as it sets out to 3D print pupils’ lunches this week. If new research by The Big Bang Fair, the UK’s largest event aimed at inspiring young people into STEM, is anything to go on, pupils would very much prefer geometric fish & chips, and cauliflower cogs and gears to the usual fare. A study conducted into their opinions of the cutting edge technology found 71% of 11-16 year-olds think it’s crucial to have access to this kind of technology at school – not just in science labs and classrooms, but the school gym, playground and even the canteen, with 40% believing it will enable them to learn something while they eat and almost a fifth (18%) said it would help make healthy food more appetising. The study into youngsters’ attitudes to 3D printing also revealed their open-mindedness and optimism about the vast possibilities this technology holds: one fifth (20%) believe we will all have 3D printers in our homes as the norm within 3-4 years, and two thirds (67%) of kids believe it will be the norm within 10 years. And so this week, dinner ladies will be working alongside engineers to serve up a vision of the (possible) school dinners of the not-too-distant future. So what’s on the menu? MAIN DISH: · GEOMETRIC FISH & CHIPS – Hexagonal beans, cod and potato SIDES: · CAULIFLOWER COGS - Mechanical cogs of cauliflower purée · HUMMUS & GUACAMOLE LIZARD - Hummus exoskeleton and avocado scales · FIBONACCI SPIRAL SQUASH - Butternut squash Fibonacci spiral with tomato & olive oil · SPACE BROCCOLI - Three dimensional broccoli star DESSERT: · PI OF THE DAY - Fruit and yoghurt Interestingly, the majority (71%) believe it’s important to access cutting edge technology such as 3D printin
=EDITORIAL USE ONLY. MATERIALS ONLY TO BE USED IN CONJUNCTION WITH EDITORIAL STORY. COVER IMAGES DOES NOT CLAIM ANY OWNERSHIP OF THE MATERIALS. IMAGE/VIDEO COPYRIGHT REMAINS WITH THE PHOTOGRAPHER AND/OR SUPPLIER.
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School dinners have gone through many transformations over the years but none quite like this; St Helen’s Primary in Canning Town, London is aiming to use lunchtime to whet young people’s appetites for STEM (science, technology, engineering and maths) careers, as it sets out to 3D print pupils’ lunches this week. If new research by The Big Bang Fair, the UK’s largest event aimed at inspiring young people into STEM, is anything to go on, pupils would very much prefer geometric fish & chips, and cauliflower cogs and gears to the usual fare. A study conducted into their opinions of the cutting edge technology found 71% of 11-16 year-olds think it’s crucial to have access to this kind of technology at school – not just in science labs and classrooms, but the school gym, playground and even the canteen, with 40% believing it will enable them to learn something while they eat and almost a fifth (18%) said it would help make healthy food more appetising. The study into youngsters’ attitudes to 3D printing also revealed their open-mindedness and optimism about the vast possibilities this technology holds: one fifth (20%) believe we will all have 3D printers in our homes as the norm within 3-4 years, and two thirds (67%) of kids believe it will be the norm within 10 years. And so this week, dinner ladies will be working alongside engineers to serve up a vision of the (possible) school dinners of the not-too-distant future. So what’s on the menu? MAIN DISH: · GEOMETRIC FISH & CHIPS – Hexagonal beans, cod and potato SIDES: · CAULIFLOWER COGS - Mechanical cogs of cauliflower purée · HUMMUS & GUACAMOLE LIZARD - Hummus exoskeleton and avocado scales · FIBONACCI SPIRAL SQUASH - Butternut squash Fibonacci spiral with tomato & olive oil · SPACE BROCCOLI - Three dimensional broccoli star DESSERT: · PI OF THE DAY - Fruit and yoghurt Interestingly, the majority (71%) believe it’s important to access cutting edge technology such as 3D printin
=EDITORIAL USE ONLY. MATERIALS ONLY TO BE USED IN CONJUNCTION WITH EDITORIAL STORY. COVER IMAGES DOES NOT CLAIM ANY OWNERSHIP OF THE MATERIALS. IMAGE/VIDEO COPYRIGHT REMAINS WITH THE PHOTOGRAPHER AND/OR SUPPLIER.
EN_01343619_0011 COV
School dinners have gone through many transformations over the years but none quite like this; St Helen’s Primary in Canning Town, London is aiming to use lunchtime to whet young people’s appetites for STEM (science, technology, engineering and maths) careers, as it sets out to 3D print pupils’ lunches this week. If new research by The Big Bang Fair, the UK’s largest event aimed at inspiring young people into STEM, is anything to go on, pupils would very much prefer geometric fish & chips, and cauliflower cogs and gears to the usual fare. A study conducted into their opinions of the cutting edge technology found 71% of 11-16 year-olds think it’s crucial to have access to this kind of technology at school – not just in science labs and classrooms, but the school gym, playground and even the canteen, with 40% believing it will enable them to learn something while they eat and almost a fifth (18%) said it would help make healthy food more appetising. The study into youngsters’ attitudes to 3D printing also revealed their open-mindedness and optimism about the vast possibilities this technology holds: one fifth (20%) believe we will all have 3D printers in our homes as the norm within 3-4 years, and two thirds (67%) of kids believe it will be the norm within 10 years. And so this week, dinner ladies will be working alongside engineers to serve up a vision of the (possible) school dinners of the not-too-distant future. So what’s on the menu? MAIN DISH: · GEOMETRIC FISH & CHIPS – Hexagonal beans, cod and potato SIDES: · CAULIFLOWER COGS - Mechanical cogs of cauliflower purée · HUMMUS & GUACAMOLE LIZARD - Hummus exoskeleton and avocado scales · FIBONACCI SPIRAL SQUASH - Butternut squash Fibonacci spiral with tomato & olive oil · SPACE BROCCOLI - Three dimensional broccoli star DESSERT: · PI OF THE DAY - Fruit and yoghurt Interestingly, the majority (71%) believe it’s important to access cutting edge technology such as 3D printin
=EDITORIAL USE ONLY. MATERIALS ONLY TO BE USED IN CONJUNCTION WITH EDITORIAL STORY. COVER IMAGES DOES NOT CLAIM ANY OWNERSHIP OF THE MATERIALS. IMAGE/VIDEO COPYRIGHT REMAINS WITH THE PHOTOGRAPHER AND/OR SUPPLIER.
EN_01343619_0012 COV
School dinners have gone through many transformations over the years but none quite like this; St Helen’s Primary in Canning Town, London is aiming to use lunchtime to whet young people’s appetites for STEM (science, technology, engineering and maths) careers, as it sets out to 3D print pupils’ lunches this week. If new research by The Big Bang Fair, the UK’s largest event aimed at inspiring young people into STEM, is anything to go on, pupils would very much prefer geometric fish & chips, and cauliflower cogs and gears to the usual fare. A study conducted into their opinions of the cutting edge technology found 71% of 11-16 year-olds think it’s crucial to have access to this kind of technology at school – not just in science labs and classrooms, but the school gym, playground and even the canteen, with 40% believing it will enable them to learn something while they eat and almost a fifth (18%) said it would help make healthy food more appetising. The study into youngsters’ attitudes to 3D printing also revealed their open-mindedness and optimism about the vast possibilities this technology holds: one fifth (20%) believe we will all have 3D printers in our homes as the norm within 3-4 years, and two thirds (67%) of kids believe it will be the norm within 10 years. And so this week, dinner ladies will be working alongside engineers to serve up a vision of the (possible) school dinners of the not-too-distant future. So what’s on the menu? MAIN DISH: · GEOMETRIC FISH & CHIPS – Hexagonal beans, cod and potato SIDES: · CAULIFLOWER COGS - Mechanical cogs of cauliflower purée · HUMMUS & GUACAMOLE LIZARD - Hummus exoskeleton and avocado scales · FIBONACCI SPIRAL SQUASH - Butternut squash Fibonacci spiral with tomato & olive oil · SPACE BROCCOLI - Three dimensional broccoli star DESSERT: · PI OF THE DAY - Fruit and yoghurt Interestingly, the majority (71%) believe it’s important to access cutting edge technology such as 3D printin
=EDITORIAL USE ONLY. MATERIALS ONLY TO BE USED IN CONJUNCTION WITH EDITORIAL STORY. COVER IMAGES DOES NOT CLAIM ANY OWNERSHIP OF THE MATERIALS. IMAGE/VIDEO COPYRIGHT REMAINS WITH THE PHOTOGRAPHER AND/OR SUPPLIER.
EN_01343619_0013 COV
School dinners have gone through many transformations over the years but none quite like this; St Helen’s Primary in Canning Town, London is aiming to use lunchtime to whet young people’s appetites for STEM (science, technology, engineering and maths) careers, as it sets out to 3D print pupils’ lunches this week. If new research by The Big Bang Fair, the UK’s largest event aimed at inspiring young people into STEM, is anything to go on, pupils would very much prefer geometric fish & chips, and cauliflower cogs and gears to the usual fare. A study conducted into their opinions of the cutting edge technology found 71% of 11-16 year-olds think it’s crucial to have access to this kind of technology at school – not just in science labs and classrooms, but the school gym, playground and even the canteen, with 40% believing it will enable them to learn something while they eat and almost a fifth (18%) said it would help make healthy food more appetising. The study into youngsters’ attitudes to 3D printing also revealed their open-mindedness and optimism about the vast possibilities this technology holds: one fifth (20%) believe we will all have 3D printers in our homes as the norm within 3-4 years, and two thirds (67%) of kids believe it will be the norm within 10 years. And so this week, dinner ladies will be working alongside engineers to serve up a vision of the (possible) school dinners of the not-too-distant future. So what’s on the menu? MAIN DISH: · GEOMETRIC FISH & CHIPS – Hexagonal beans, cod and potato SIDES: · CAULIFLOWER COGS - Mechanical cogs of cauliflower purée · HUMMUS & GUACAMOLE LIZARD - Hummus exoskeleton and avocado scales · FIBONACCI SPIRAL SQUASH - Butternut squash Fibonacci spiral with tomato & olive oil · SPACE BROCCOLI - Three dimensional broccoli star DESSERT: · PI OF THE DAY - Fruit and yoghurt Interestingly, the majority (71%) believe it’s important to access cutting edge technology such as 3D printin
=EDITORIAL USE ONLY. MATERIALS ONLY TO BE USED IN CONJUNCTION WITH EDITORIAL STORY. COVER IMAGES DOES NOT CLAIM ANY OWNERSHIP OF THE MATERIALS. IMAGE/VIDEO COPYRIGHT REMAINS WITH THE PHOTOGRAPHER AND/OR SUPPLIER.
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