piątek, 19 października 2018
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Wąż sprzed 100 milionów lat (2)

EN_01330578_0001 FER
Ferrari Press Agency Ref 9423 Snake 1 19/07/2018 See Ferrari text Picture credit: Cheung Chung Tat A baby snake found encased in 105-million-year-old amber from the time of dinosaurs, has given scientists new clues to how serpents evolved.It is also giving a colourful picture of the biodiversity of the former supercontinent called Gondwana.Among these discoveries are a range of invertebrates, dinosaurs, pterosaurus and small lizards found in amber which is fossilised tree resin), in the forests of Myanmar in Southeast Asia.About 150 million years ago in the later Jurassic time period, Myanmar was joined to Australia, Antarctica, Africa and South America, as part of Gondwana. Through continental drift, Myanmar eventually separated from Gondwana and drifted north, until it collided with Asia.The baby snake, indentified as Xiaophis , was part of the fauna that rode on this drifting landmass, which like a gigantic passenger ship transported all sorts of Gondwanan plants and animals to Asia.An international research team, led by Dr Lida Xing of the China University of Geosciences, Beijing) and Professor Mike Caldwell of the University of Alberta, Canada, have described the first-ever fossil snake found in amber.The researchers, including Flinders University palaeontology researchers Dr Alessandro Palci and Professor Michael Lee based at the South Australian Museum, say the snake named Xiaophis myanmarensis is a vital link to the snakes that later evolved in Australia and elsewhere.Matthew Flinders research fellow Professor Lee said: ??sIn fact, even though Xiaophis was found in the northern hemisphere it resembles Gondwanan snakes.??sYoung reptiles have poorly formed bones and rarely preserve as fossils, so Xiaophis is very important.??? He added that the preserved backbone of the 8cm long Xiaophis specimen, shows the hallmarks of a baby snake.He continued:??sThe tender age at which the snake died can be inferred by its small size and features of its backbone elem
EN_01330578_0002 FER
Ferrari Press Agency Ref 9423 Snake 1 19/07/2018 See Ferrari text Picture credit: Cheung Chung Tat A baby snake found encased in 105-million-year-old amber from the time of dinosaurs, has given scientists new clues to how serpents evolved.It is also giving a colourful picture of the biodiversity of the former supercontinent called Gondwana.Among these discoveries are a range of invertebrates, dinosaurs, pterosaurus and small lizards found in amber which is fossilised tree resin), in the forests of Myanmar in Southeast Asia.About 150 million years ago in the later Jurassic time period, Myanmar was joined to Australia, Antarctica, Africa and South America, as part of Gondwana. Through continental drift, Myanmar eventually separated from Gondwana and drifted north, until it collided with Asia.The baby snake, indentified as Xiaophis , was part of the fauna that rode on this drifting landmass, which like a gigantic passenger ship transported all sorts of Gondwanan plants and animals to Asia.An international research team, led by Dr Lida Xing of the China University of Geosciences, Beijing) and Professor Mike Caldwell of the University of Alberta, Canada, have described the first-ever fossil snake found in amber.The researchers, including Flinders University palaeontology researchers Dr Alessandro Palci and Professor Michael Lee based at the South Australian Museum, say the snake named Xiaophis myanmarensis is a vital link to the snakes that later evolved in Australia and elsewhere.Matthew Flinders research fellow Professor Lee said: ??sIn fact, even though Xiaophis was found in the northern hemisphere it resembles Gondwanan snakes.??sYoung reptiles have poorly formed bones and rarely preserve as fossils, so Xiaophis is very important.??? He added that the preserved backbone of the 8cm long Xiaophis specimen, shows the hallmarks of a baby snake.He continued:??sThe tender age at which the snake died can be inferred by its small size and features of its backbone elem
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