piątek, 19 października 2018
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Zwłoki jak prawdziwe (7)

EN_01324426_0001 FER
Ferrari Press Agency Virtual body 1 Ref 9300 12/06/2018 See Ferrari text Picture credit: Montpellier Medical University Researchers have created “virtual cadavers” in the hope of solving the worldwide shortage of dead bodies for training medical students.Dead bodies for research and teaching have long been in high demand, but in recent years, the shortage has worsened. The number of medical programs is growing, so demand is reportedly going up.At the same time, supply is going down because better communication means fewer unclaimed bodies. Donating is still taboo in some parts of the world, and the ideal cadaver ,young, generally healthy, and intact ,can be hard to find.Researchers hope that a virtual cadaver can teach students the basics of dissection.Leading the research and use is Professor Guillaume Captier, a surgeon r at Montepellier Medical University in France. He said once students had experience with a virtual body “they can progress to the real thing.”He added:” The goal is to create a 3D database of the main anatomical regions of interest and develop a method of virtual dissection to simulate realistic and customizable traditional anatomical dissection remains the standard for learning anatomy. “Virtual dissection can be used in learning anatomy for students and trainees in surgery before going to the operating room.”Prof Captier’s team created two virtual dissections: one for the neck area and one for the pelvis. For each, he performed a dissection on a real cadaver from the skin to the muscles to the arteries — eight levels in all. At every level, a technician scanned the flesh and body parts using an Artec 3D scanner. Each layer of the scan took up to 10 minutes, and each dissection took a day in total to complete. The flesh and some tissues can difficult to scan because it is translucent.Benjamin Moreno, who works for IMA Solutions , the company that operated the 3D scanner, said:” In the future, we’re thinking of addin
EN_01324426_0002 FER
Ferrari Press Agency Virtual body 1 Ref 9300 12/06/2018 See Ferrari text Picture credit: Montpellier Medical University Researchers have created “virtual cadavers” in the hope of solving the worldwide shortage of dead bodies for training medical students.Dead bodies for research and teaching have long been in high demand, but in recent years, the shortage has worsened. The number of medical programs is growing, so demand is reportedly going up.At the same time, supply is going down because better communication means fewer unclaimed bodies. Donating is still taboo in some parts of the world, and the ideal cadaver ,young, generally healthy, and intact ,can be hard to find.Researchers hope that a virtual cadaver can teach students the basics of dissection.Leading the research and use is Professor Guillaume Captier, a surgeon r at Montepellier Medical University in France. He said once students had experience with a virtual body “they can progress to the real thing.”He added:” The goal is to create a 3D database of the main anatomical regions of interest and develop a method of virtual dissection to simulate realistic and customizable traditional anatomical dissection remains the standard for learning anatomy. “Virtual dissection can be used in learning anatomy for students and trainees in surgery before going to the operating room.”Prof Captier’s team created two virtual dissections: one for the neck area and one for the pelvis. For each, he performed a dissection on a real cadaver from the skin to the muscles to the arteries — eight levels in all. At every level, a technician scanned the flesh and body parts using an Artec 3D scanner. Each layer of the scan took up to 10 minutes, and each dissection took a day in total to complete. The flesh and some tissues can difficult to scan because it is translucent.Benjamin Moreno, who works for IMA Solutions , the company that operated the 3D scanner, said:” In the future, we’re thinking of addin
EN_01324426_0003 FER
Ferrari Press Agency Virtual body 1 Ref 9300 12/06/2018 See Ferrari text Picture credit: Montpellier Medical University Researchers have created “virtual cadavers” in the hope of solving the worldwide shortage of dead bodies for training medical students.Dead bodies for research and teaching have long been in high demand, but in recent years, the shortage has worsened. The number of medical programs is growing, so demand is reportedly going up.At the same time, supply is going down because better communication means fewer unclaimed bodies. Donating is still taboo in some parts of the world, and the ideal cadaver ,young, generally healthy, and intact ,can be hard to find.Researchers hope that a virtual cadaver can teach students the basics of dissection.Leading the research and use is Professor Guillaume Captier, a surgeon r at Montepellier Medical University in France. He said once students had experience with a virtual body “they can progress to the real thing.”He added:” The goal is to create a 3D database of the main anatomical regions of interest and develop a method of virtual dissection to simulate realistic and customizable traditional anatomical dissection remains the standard for learning anatomy. “Virtual dissection can be used in learning anatomy for students and trainees in surgery before going to the operating room.”Prof Captier’s team created two virtual dissections: one for the neck area and one for the pelvis. For each, he performed a dissection on a real cadaver from the skin to the muscles to the arteries — eight levels in all. At every level, a technician scanned the flesh and body parts using an Artec 3D scanner. Each layer of the scan took up to 10 minutes, and each dissection took a day in total to complete. The flesh and some tissues can difficult to scan because it is translucent.Benjamin Moreno, who works for IMA Solutions , the company that operated the 3D scanner, said:” In the future, we’re thinking of addin
EN_01324426_0004 FER
Ferrari Press Agency Virtual body 1 Ref 9300 12/06/2018 See Ferrari text Picture credit: Montpellier Medical University Researchers have created “virtual cadavers” in the hope of solving the worldwide shortage of dead bodies for training medical students.Dead bodies for research and teaching have long been in high demand, but in recent years, the shortage has worsened. The number of medical programs is growing, so demand is reportedly going up.At the same time, supply is going down because better communication means fewer unclaimed bodies. Donating is still taboo in some parts of the world, and the ideal cadaver ,young, generally healthy, and intact ,can be hard to find.Researchers hope that a virtual cadaver can teach students the basics of dissection.Leading the research and use is Professor Guillaume Captier, a surgeon r at Montepellier Medical University in France. He said once students had experience with a virtual body “they can progress to the real thing.”He added:” The goal is to create a 3D database of the main anatomical regions of interest and develop a method of virtual dissection to simulate realistic and customizable traditional anatomical dissection remains the standard for learning anatomy. “Virtual dissection can be used in learning anatomy for students and trainees in surgery before going to the operating room.”Prof Captier’s team created two virtual dissections: one for the neck area and one for the pelvis. For each, he performed a dissection on a real cadaver from the skin to the muscles to the arteries — eight levels in all. At every level, a technician scanned the flesh and body parts using an Artec 3D scanner. Each layer of the scan took up to 10 minutes, and each dissection took a day in total to complete. The flesh and some tissues can difficult to scan because it is translucent.Benjamin Moreno, who works for IMA Solutions , the company that operated the 3D scanner, said:” In the future, we’re thinking of addin
EN_01324426_0005 FER
Ferrari Press Agency Virtual body 1 Ref 9300 12/06/2018 See Ferrari text Picture credit: Montpellier Medical University Researchers have created “virtual cadavers” in the hope of solving the worldwide shortage of dead bodies for training medical students.Dead bodies for research and teaching have long been in high demand, but in recent years, the shortage has worsened. The number of medical programs is growing, so demand is reportedly going up.At the same time, supply is going down because better communication means fewer unclaimed bodies. Donating is still taboo in some parts of the world, and the ideal cadaver ,young, generally healthy, and intact ,can be hard to find.Researchers hope that a virtual cadaver can teach students the basics of dissection.Leading the research and use is Professor Guillaume Captier, a surgeon r at Montepellier Medical University in France. He said once students had experience with a virtual body “they can progress to the real thing.”He added:” The goal is to create a 3D database of the main anatomical regions of interest and develop a method of virtual dissection to simulate realistic and customizable traditional anatomical dissection remains the standard for learning anatomy. “Virtual dissection can be used in learning anatomy for students and trainees in surgery before going to the operating room.”Prof Captier’s team created two virtual dissections: one for the neck area and one for the pelvis. For each, he performed a dissection on a real cadaver from the skin to the muscles to the arteries — eight levels in all. At every level, a technician scanned the flesh and body parts using an Artec 3D scanner. Each layer of the scan took up to 10 minutes, and each dissection took a day in total to complete. The flesh and some tissues can difficult to scan because it is translucent.Benjamin Moreno, who works for IMA Solutions , the company that operated the 3D scanner, said:” In the future, we’re thinking of addin
EN_01324426_0006 FER
Ferrari Press Agency Virtual body 1 Ref 9300 12/06/2018 See Ferrari text Picture credit: Montpellier Medical University Researchers have created “virtual cadavers” in the hope of solving the worldwide shortage of dead bodies for training medical students.Dead bodies for research and teaching have long been in high demand, but in recent years, the shortage has worsened. The number of medical programs is growing, so demand is reportedly going up.At the same time, supply is going down because better communication means fewer unclaimed bodies. Donating is still taboo in some parts of the world, and the ideal cadaver ,young, generally healthy, and intact ,can be hard to find.Researchers hope that a virtual cadaver can teach students the basics of dissection.Leading the research and use is Professor Guillaume Captier, a surgeon r at Montepellier Medical University in France. He said once students had experience with a virtual body “they can progress to the real thing.”He added:” The goal is to create a 3D database of the main anatomical regions of interest and develop a method of virtual dissection to simulate realistic and customizable traditional anatomical dissection remains the standard for learning anatomy. “Virtual dissection can be used in learning anatomy for students and trainees in surgery before going to the operating room.”Prof Captier’s team created two virtual dissections: one for the neck area and one for the pelvis. For each, he performed a dissection on a real cadaver from the skin to the muscles to the arteries — eight levels in all. At every level, a technician scanned the flesh and body parts using an Artec 3D scanner. Each layer of the scan took up to 10 minutes, and each dissection took a day in total to complete. The flesh and some tissues can difficult to scan because it is translucent.Benjamin Moreno, who works for IMA Solutions , the company that operated the 3D scanner, said:” In the future, we’re thinking of addin
EN_01324426_0007 FER
Ferrari Press Agency Virtual body 1 Ref 9300 12/06/2018 See Ferrari text Picture credit: Montpellier Medical University Researchers have created “virtual cadavers” in the hope of solving the worldwide shortage of dead bodies for training medical students.Dead bodies for research and teaching have long been in high demand, but in recent years, the shortage has worsened. The number of medical programs is growing, so demand is reportedly going up.At the same time, supply is going down because better communication means fewer unclaimed bodies. Donating is still taboo in some parts of the world, and the ideal cadaver ,young, generally healthy, and intact ,can be hard to find.Researchers hope that a virtual cadaver can teach students the basics of dissection.Leading the research and use is Professor Guillaume Captier, a surgeon r at Montepellier Medical University in France. He said once students had experience with a virtual body “they can progress to the real thing.”He added:” The goal is to create a 3D database of the main anatomical regions of interest and develop a method of virtual dissection to simulate realistic and customizable traditional anatomical dissection remains the standard for learning anatomy. “Virtual dissection can be used in learning anatomy for students and trainees in surgery before going to the operating room.”Prof Captier’s team created two virtual dissections: one for the neck area and one for the pelvis. For each, he performed a dissection on a real cadaver from the skin to the muscles to the arteries — eight levels in all. At every level, a technician scanned the flesh and body parts using an Artec 3D scanner. Each layer of the scan took up to 10 minutes, and each dissection took a day in total to complete. The flesh and some tissues can difficult to scan because it is translucent.Benjamin Moreno, who works for IMA Solutions , the company that operated the 3D scanner, said:” In the future, we’re thinking of addin
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