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Image State The Print Collector (25095)

234... z 197
EN_01350909_0001 IMA
'William, Prince of Orange', 20th century. Modern version of a 17th century portrait. A protestant, William of Orange (1650-1702) was invited by a conspiracy of English notables to depose the Catholic James II and assume the throne in his stead. The invasion, which was virtually bloodless, was successful and became known as the 'Glorious Revolution'. James fled to France and the Prince of Orange was crowned William III of Great Britain and Ireland on 11 April 1689. He co-ruled with his wife Mary II from 1689, continuing as sole ruler after her death in 1694.
EN_01350909_0002 IMA
'Alexander Pope', 1774. Pope (1688-1744) is considered one of the greatest English poets of the eighteenth century. A plate from "The Copper-Plate Magazine or A Monthly Treasure", London, 1774.
EN_01350909_0003 IMA
'The Royal Military Academy at Woolwich', London, 1775.
EN_01350909_0004 IMA
King Edward VII in Lord Montagu's 1899 Daimler 12hp, 1900.
EN_01350909_0005 IMA
Peter Paul Rubens, Flemish artist, 19th century. Rubens (1577-1640) is considered by many to be one of the greatest painters in European art history, a master of the Baroque style and the most important Flemish painter of the 17th century.
EN_01350909_0006 IMA
'Birmingham', England, 19th century. View of smoking factory chimneys in the city of Birmingham in the West Midlands. During the Industrial Revolution, Birmingham became an important centre of metal manufacturing, engineering and trade.
EN_01350909_0007 IMA
'Belgrade', 1883. View of the city in Serbia and Montenegro, which lies at the confluence of the Danube and Sava rivers.
EN_01350909_0008 IMA
The harbour at Bayonne, France, 1879.
EN_01350909_0009 IMA
William Pitt, 1st Earl of Chatham, British Whig statesman, 19th century. Portrait of Prime Minister William Pitt, 1st Earl of Chatham (1708-1778).
EN_01350909_0010 IMA
The Tower of London, England, 1895.
EN_01350909_0011 IMA
Bahia, Brazil, 1877. Sailing ships off the coast of Bahia.
EN_01350909_0012 IMA
Lucerne, Central Switzerland, 19th century. View of the lake and mountains with a water mill in the foreground.
EN_01350909_0013 IMA
'Sea of Galilee or Lake of Tiberias', 1887. View of the freshwater lake in what is now northeastern Israel, through which the Jordan River flows.
EN_01350909_0014 IMA
'The Confession', Mount Athos, northern Greece, 1886. A man confesses to Greek Orthodox priest.
EN_01350909_0015 IMA
'Types and costumes in Lapland', 1879. Saami people from northern Scandinavia in traditional costume. The Saami were formerly known as Lapps or Laplanders, terms now considered derogatory. During the 18th and 19th centuries, government policies attacked the Saami way of life, but in 1966 the Saami came under the protection of the United Nations International Covenant on Civil and Political Rights.
EN_01350909_0016 IMA
Tziganes camping in the Puszta, 1886. Camp of nomads in the grasslands of eastern Hungary.
EN_01350909_0017 IMA
'Loading a Cotton Steamer', 1877. This is probably a scene on the River Mississippi in the American South.
EN_01350909_0018 IMA
Andrew Johnson, President of the United States, 20th century. Johnson (1808-1875) succeeded to the presidency upon the assassination of Abraham Lincoln. His term lasted from 1865 to 1869.
EN_01350909_0019 IMA
Thomas Moore, Irish poet, 1877. Portrait of Moore (1779-1852).
EN_01350909_0020 IMA
Cuba, 19th century.
EN_01350909_0021 IMA
'The Sultan at the Mosque of St Sophia', Constantinople, Turkey, 19th century. Hagia Sophia, also known as the Church of the Holy Wisdom, is the most famous Byzantine structure in Constantinople (now Istanbul). Built between 532 and 537 AD by Emperor Justinian I, it was a mosque for a time, and is now a museum.
EN_01350909_0022 IMA
William Shakespeare, English playwright, (19th century). Portrait of the poet and playwright (1564-1616).
EN_01350909_0023 IMA
Percy Bysshe Shelley, English romantic poet, 19th century. Portrait of Shelley (1792-1822) who drowned in a sailing accident.
EN_01350909_0024 IMA
Matthew Arnold, English poet and cultural critic, c1880s. Arnold (1822-1888) was inspector of schools and professor of poetry.
EN_01350909_0025 IMA
James, Duke of Monmouth, (1806). Portrait of James Crofts, later Scott, 1st Duke of Monmouth, 1st Duke of Buccleuch (1649-1685), Pretender to throne of Scotland and England. Monmouth, the illegitimate son of Charles II and Lucy Walter launched a rebellion in 1685. Claiming to be Charles' rightful heir, he attempted to overthrow the Roman Catholic King James II. His revolt ended in defeat at the Battle of Sedgmoor, Somerset, on 6 July 1685 and Monmouth was subsequently beheaded on Tower Hill.
EN_01350909_0026 IMA
'Westminster Hospital and Abbey Church', London, 19th century. The hospital, which opened in the 18th century, was rebuilt in the 1830s, and demolished in 1950. On the right is Westminster Abbey, dating from the 13th century.
EN_01350909_0027 IMA
Botleys, Surrey, 19th century. View of the 18th-century Palladian style manor house designed by Keaton Couse and built in 1765.
EN_01350909_0028 IMA
Dunsfold Church, Surrey, 1850. The church was built mainly between 1260 and 1290.
EN_01350909_0029 IMA
Queen Victoria's funeral procession passing through London, 1901. Victoria (1819-1901) was the longest-ruling British monarch, reigning from 1837-1901.
EN_01350909_0030 IMA
'Old Clothes!', Fitzroy Square, London, 1805. A copper plate representing the itinerant traders of London, from "Modern London; Being the History and Present State of the British Metropolis", by Richard Phillips, London, 1805.
EN_01350909_0031 IMA
'Native of Mozambique', c1850. Tattooed inhabitant of Mozambique, Africa. Engraving from the "Natural History of Man" by James Pritchard, (London, 1855).
EN_01350909_0032 IMA
Major-General Philip Philip Kearny, American soldier, (1872). Union soldier Philip Kearny (1815-1862) was killed on 1 September 1862 at Chantilly, Virginia. Engraving from John Gilmary Shea's "A Child's History of the United States", Hess and McDavitt, (New York, 1872).
EN_01350909_0033 IMA
Colonel Charles Lambert Russel, American soldier, (1872). Union soldier Russel (1828-1862) was killed at Roanoke on 8 February 1862. The Battle of Roanoke Island, also known as the Battle of Fort Huger, took place February 7/8, 1862, in Dare County, North Carolina, as part of Union Army Brigadier General Ambrose E Burnside's North Carolina expedition during the American Civil War. Engraving from "A Child's History of the United States" by John Gilmary Shea, published by Hess and McDavitt, (New York, 1872).
EN_01350909_0034 IMA
King George V, c1935. George Frederick Ernest Albert (1865-1936) was a British monarch of the House of Windsor. King of the United Kingdom, Great Britain, Northern Ireland and the Commonwealth Realms, George was also the Emperor of India. George reigned from 1910 until his death.
EN_01350909_0035 IMA
Queen Clotilda, c1100, (1843). Engraving after a sculpture at the church of Notre Dame de Corbeil, France. The Bourguignon princess Clotilda (later canonized as St Clotilda), was the wife of the Frankish king, Clovis I. Clotilda was almost certainly behind Clovis's conversion to Christianity, and he was baptised in 496 AD. Illustration from "Dresses and Decorations of the Middle Ages from the Seventh to the Seventeenth Centuries", by Henry Shaw, (London, 1843).
EN_01350909_0036 IMA
Paul Bourget, French novelist and critic, late 19th-early 20th century. Portrait of Bourget (1852-1935).
EN_01350909_0037 IMA
Honore de Balzac, French novelist and literary critic. Portrait of Balzac (1799-1850), one of France's most important literary figures.
EN_01350909_0038 IMA
Early Norman stockings and boots, (1910). Footwear dating from the Norman Conquest of Britain in 1066. Illustration from "British Costume during 19 Centuries" by Mrs Charles H Ashdown, (London, 1910).
EN_01350909_0039 IMA
Shanghai advertising poster, c1930s.
EN_01350909_0040 IMA
'Gulielmus Hogarth', 19th century. The portrait deliberately projects a guide to the way Hogarth (1697-1764) wanted others to think of him. The artist's painting in informal dress rests on a pile of books labelled (in the finished engraving) Shakespeare, Milton and Swift. William Shakespeare and John Milton were generally acknowledged to be the greatest modern English authors and Jonathan Swift was a vigorous modern satirist. The palette and graver represent Hogarth's twin roles as painter and engraver and the 'Line of Beauty' alludes to his favourite art theory. The only living object in the painting is Hogarth's pet pug, Trump. Hogarth announces himself as essentially English. He despised the slavish following of foreign models, and believed that art should be based on the imitation of nature, like the work of the great English authors.
EN_01350909_0041 IMA
'Bradley', 19th century. James Bradley (1693-1762) was an English astronomer, Astronomer Royal from 1742. He is best known for discovering the aberration of light.
EN_01350909_0042 IMA
'Cortez', 19th century. Hernan Cortes (1485-1547), Spanish conquistador who conquered Mexico. Cortes landed in Mexico in 1519. With a force of only some 600 men, he succeeded in overthrowing the empire of the Aztecs, a civilization numbering 5 million. He was able to achieve this partly due to the natives being terrified of the Europeans' horses and firearms, neither of which they had seen before. In addition, the Aztecs believed a prophecy that they would be visited by a light-skinned bearded god, the Quetzalcoatl, who had taught them agriculture and government in the past, and whose return they were to welcome with great ceremony. Cortes was able to exploit his resemblance to the Quetzalcoatl to great effect.
EN_01350909_0043 IMA
Lieutenant-Colonel Francois-Louis Lessard, Canadian Mounted Infantry, South Africa, 1902. Portrait from "Celebrities of the Army", published by George Newnes, (London, 1902).
EN_01350909_0044 IMA
Lieutenant-Colonel William Dillon Otter, commanding Royal Canadian Regiment of Infantry, South Africa, 1902. In 1908 Otter (1843-1929) became the first Canadian-born soldier to command Canada's army. Portrait from "Celebrities of the Army", published by George Newnes, (London, 1902).
EN_01350909_0045 IMA
James Douglas, 4th Earl of Morton, (1870). Douglas (c1525-1581) was regent of Scotland during the minority of James VI. An engraving from Robert Chambers' "A Biographical Dictionary of Eminent Scotsmen", Blackie and Son, (Glasgow, Edinburgh, and London, 1870).
EN_01350909_0046 IMA
Delhi, India, 1893. An engraving from James Taylor's "The Age We Live In: A History of the Nineteenth Century, From the Peace of 1815 to the Present Time", William Mackenzie, (London, 1893).
EN_01350909_0047 IMA
Benjamin Disraeli, 1st Earl of Beaconsfield, English statesman and literary figure, (1893). Disraeli (1804-1881) was twice Prime Minister of Britain, first in 1868 and then again between 1874 and 1880. Under his Conservative government, the British Empire expanded and in 1876 he conferred on Queen Victoria the title Empress of India. An engraving from James Taylor's "The Age We Live In: A History of the Nineteenth Century, From the Peace of 1815 to the Present Time", William Mackenzie, (London, 1893).
EN_01350909_0048 IMA
Goltzius's engraving of the son of his friend, Theodore Frisius, playing with his Frisian hound, Rome, 1599, (1913). A print from "The Connoisseur', London, 1913.
EN_01350909_0049 IMA
'First Madras Pioneers', c1890. A coloured lithographic plate from "Her Majesty's Army, Indian and Colonial Forces" by Walter Richards, JS Virtue & Company, (London, c1890).
EN_01350909_0050 IMA
An orange grove in the south of Spain, c1890. An engraving from Robert Brown's "The Countries of the World", published by Cassell, (London & Paris, c1890).
EN_01350909_0051 IMA
French infantry regiment returning from the front, 30 March 1918.
EN_01350909_0052 IMA
French artillery position, France, 1918, (1926).
EN_01350909_0053 IMA
The re-supply of a machine gun unit by horseback, Aisne, France, 2 September 1918.
EN_01350909_0054 IMA
Yakov Yurovsky, chief executioner of Tsar Nicholas II and his family, (1926). A watchmaker from Perm, Yurovsky (1878-1938) testified to being the leader of the group of Bolsheviks that murdered Nicholas II and his family at Yekaterinburg on 17 July 1918.
EN_01350909_0055 IMA
William Villiers, 2nd Viscount Grandison of Limerick, (1827). Portrait of Irish aristocrat Villiers (1614-1643), wearing elaborate lace collar and cuffs.
EN_01350909_0056 IMA
James, 2nd Marquis of Hamilton, (1828). Hamilton (1589-1625) was a Scottish politician.
EN_01350909_0057 IMA
King Albert of the Belgians during the siege of Antwerp, Belgium, September-October 1914 (1926). After the Germans invaded his country on 4 August 1914, Albert I took personal command of Belgium's army. After the fall of the forts at Liege on 16 August, Albert ordered the 65,000 remaining Belgian troops to fall back to the fortified city of Antwerp. Antwerp itself was evacuated by the Belgians on 7 October, with the troops retreating to Oostende.
EN_01350909_0058 IMA
'Burke, the Great Orator', 18th century (c1850s). Edmund Burke (1729-1797) was one of the greatest Parliamentary speakers during the reign of George III. He was a supporter of the grievances of American colonies but a fierce opponent of the French Revolution. Colour plate taken from the book "Pictures of English History", George Routledge And Sons, (London, New York, c1850).
EN_01350909_0059 IMA
Houses of Parliament, London, 20th Century. Much of the present Palace of Westminster was designed by Charles Barry and Augustus Welby Pugin, and was constructed between 1837 and 1858, when the clock tower (Big Ben) was completed. Postcard from "The Souvenir Album, Views of London And The River Thames, From London To Oxford", (London, 20th Century).
EN_01350909_0060 IMA
Stamford Street, London, 1830.
EN_01350909_0061 IMA
Portrait of a young man, c1590-1595, (1896). Portrait, previously believed to have been of Sir Philip Sidney. Illustration after a miniature in the Royal Collection at Windsor Castle, from a work published by Boussod, Valadon & Co, (1896).
EN_01350909_0062 IMA
'The Kentucky Lynching', c1860. A victim is hanged from the courthouse. Illustration from "Adventures of America, 1857-1900", by John A Kouwenhoven, published by Harper & Brothers, (New York, London, 1938).
EN_01350909_0063 IMA
Nicolas Copernicus, Polish astronomer and mathematician, (1833). Copernicus (1473-1543) is considered to be the father of modern astronomy and founder of heliocentric cosmology. Prior to the work of Copernicus, the Earth was considered to be the stationary centre of the universe, a notion first advocated by the Egyptian astronomer Ptolemy. Copernicus' pioneering work "De revolutionibus orbium coelestium" (The Revolutions of Celestial Spheres) (1543) describes his idea of a Sun-centred universe, in which the Earth is merely one of the planets revolving around the Sun and rotating on its axis.
EN_01350909_0064 IMA
Charles James Fox, British Whig politician, (1833). Portrait of Fox (1749-1806).
EN_01350909_0065 IMA
Francois Fenelon, French theologian, poet and writer, (1833). Francois de Salignac de la Mothe, more commonly known as Francois Fenelon (1651-1715), was a French Roman Catholic theologian, poet and writer.
EN_01350909_0066 IMA
The Costume Of Marriage, (1885). Illustration from "18th Century Institutions, Usages And Costumes, France 1700-1789", by Paul Lacroix, (Paris, 1885).
EN_01350909_0067 IMA
A Lantern Merchant, 1737-1742. Part of a series called 'Paris Street Cries', by Bouchardon.
EN_01350909_0068 IMA
The Promenade, Paris, (1885). Illustration from "18th Century Institutions, Usages And Costumes, France 1700-1789", by Paul Lacroix, (Paris, 1885).
EN_01350909_0069 IMA
A British attack using the bayonet and grenade, Neuve-Chapelle, France, 10 March 1915, (1926). The British successfully broke through the German lines in Artois at the Battle of Neuve-Chapelle in March 1915 but were unable to exploit the situation due to poor communications and a shortage of artillery shells. Ultimately the British and Indians took approximately 2 kilometres of ground at a cost of 11,200 troops.
EN_01350909_0070 IMA
'The Funnel of Carency', Artois, France, June 1915, (1926). Carency was captured by the French in May 1915 during their Artois Offensive of that year.
EN_01350909_0071 IMA
A captured German trench and bunker system, Souchez, Artois, France, 1 June 1915, (1926). German positions captured by the French.
EN_01350909_0072 IMA
The lifeboats of RMS Lusitania, 7 May 1915, (1926). On 7 May 1915, a German submarine torpedoed and sank the Lusitania off the south-west coast of Ireland near Kinsale. Although an unarmed passenger ship, she was carrying munitions. 1198 people lost their lives, of whom 128 were US citizens. The sinking was a main cause of America's entry into World War I.
EN_01350909_0073 IMA
'Brisbane From Bowen Terrace', 1886. View of steamships in the harbour at Brisbane, the capital city of Queensland, Australia. Wood engraving from 'Picturesque Atlas of Australasia, Vol II', by Andrew Garran, illustrated under the supervision of Frederic B Schell, (Picturesque Atlas Publishing Co, 1886).
EN_01350909_0074 IMA
William Makepeace Thackeray, English novelist of the 19th century, (1911). Thackeray (1811-1863) is famous for his satirical works, particularly "Vanity Fair". Supplement to "The Bookman", 1911.
EN_01350909_0075 IMA
Marlene Dietrich, German-American actress, 1933. Dietrich (1901-1992), was a Academy Award-nominated German-American actress, entertainer and singer. The American Film Institute named Dietrich among the Greatest Female Stars of All Time.
EN_01350909_0076 IMA
Gary Cooper, American film actor, 1933. Cooper (1901-1961) was a two-time Academy Award-winning American film actor of English heritage.
EN_01350909_0077 IMA
Herbert Wilcox (1890-1977), British film producer, 1933.
EN_01350909_0078 IMA
CM Woolf, British film producer, 1933.
EN_01350909_0079 IMA
John Maxwell, chairman and managing director of British International Pictures, 1933. The company was founded by John Maxwell after he had purchased British National Studios and their Elstree Studios complex, renaming the company British International Pictures.
EN_01350909_0080 IMA
The future King Edward VIII at the age of sixteen, c1910. Edward (1894-1972) succeeded his father George V to the throne as King Edward VIII in 1936. He ruled from ruled 20 January 1936 until 11 December 1936, and abdicated in order to marry Wallis Simpson, an American divorcee, thus heading off an impending constitutional crisis. Illustration from "George V and Edward VIII, A Royal Souvenir", by FGH Salusbury, a souvenir book published as Edward VIII was crowned following the death of his father, George V, (Daily Express Publication, London, 1936).
EN_01350909_0081 IMA
The Prince of Wales testing a Japanese fencing helmet, Japan, 1922. The future King Edward VIII during a royal visit to Japan. Illustration from "George V and Edward VIII, A Royal Souvenir", by FGH Salusbury, a souvenir book published as Edward VIII was crowned following the death of his father, George V, (Daily Express Publication, London, 1936).
EN_01350909_0082 IMA
'6th Dragoons', 1889. A print from a supplement of "The Army and Navy Gazette", (London, 6 April 1889).
EN_01350909_0083 IMA
Letter from Oliver Cromwell to Lord Fairfax, Wexford, 15th October, 1649. Letter from Oliver Cromwell to Thomas Fairfax, 3rd Lord Fairfax of Cameron, congratulating him on the prosperity of his affairs and announcing the capture of Wexford in Ireland. From the first series of "Facsimiles of royal, historical, literary and other autographs in the Department of Manuscripts, British Museum: Series I - V", (London, 1899).
EN_01350909_0084 IMA
Letter from Edward VI to his uncle, Edward Seymour, 18th September 1547. Letter written from Otlandes (Oatlands) by King Edward VI written (on faintly ruled pencil lines) when he was not quite ten years of age, to his uncle, Edward Seymour, Duke of Somerset, Protector, on receipt of the news of his victory over the Scots at Pinkie (10th September). From the fourth series of "Facsimiles of royal, historical, literary and other autographs in the Department of Manuscripts, British Museum: Series I - V", (London, 1899).
EN_01350909_0085 IMA
Letter from George Villiers, 1st Duke of Buckingham, to James I, 25th April 1623. Letter signed "Steenie" and written while Villiers was with Charles, Prince of Wales at Madrid, urging him to send more jewels to his "babie" both for his own wear and for presents, and stating, in a postscript that he has dispatched four asses, five camels and and an elephant, which he has impudently begged for him. From the fourth series of "Facsimiles of royal, historical, literary and other autographs in the Department of Manuscripts, British Museum: Series I - V", (London, 1899).
EN_01350909_0086 IMA
Grand Duke Michael Alexandrovich of Russia in cossack uniform, 1917. Tsar Nicholas II abdicated in favour of his brother Michael. Both were assassinated in the same year.
EN_01350909_0087 IMA
Russian troops waiting for the signal, Ternopil, Ukraine, First World War, 1 July 1917. The second wave of Russian troops waiting to go "over the top".
EN_01350909_0088 IMA
Conrad Veidt, German film actor, 1934-1935. Born Hans Walter Conrad Weidt, Veidt (1893-1943) was a German actor, well known for his roles in such films as "The Cabinet of Dr Caligari" (1920) and "Casablanca" (1942). taken from "Meet the Film Stars", by Seton Margrave. (London, 1934-1935).
EN_01350909_0089 IMA
Elisabeth Bergner, Austro-Hungarian born actress, 1934-1935. Born Elisabeth Ettel. Taken from "Meet the Film Stars", by Seton Margrave. (London, 1934-1935).
EN_01350909_0090 IMA
Norma Shearer, Canadian born American actress, 1934-1935. Shearer was dubbed the First Lady of the Screen. She was nominated for the Best Actress Oscar on six occasions, winning in 1930 for her performance in "The Divorcee". Taken from "Meet the Film Stars", by Seton Margrave. (London, 1934-1935).
EN_01350909_0091 IMA
Dame Cicely Courtneidge, English actress, 1934-1935. Born Esmerelda Cicely Courtneidge, she was married to the comedian Jack Hulbert, with whom she starred in several films. Taken from "Meet the Film Stars", by Seton Margrave. (London, 1934-1935).
EN_01350909_0092 IMA
Irene Dunne, American film actress and singer, 1934-1935. Dunne was a film actress of the 1930s and 1940s. She was nominated five times for the Academy Award for Best Actress. Taken from "Meet the Film Stars", by Seton Margrave. (London, 1934-1935).
EN_01350909_0093 IMA
Major-General Sir Garnet Wolseley, KCB, British soldier, 1876. From "Men of Mark: a gallery of contemporary portraits of men distinguished in the Senate, the Church, in science, literature and art, the army, navy, law, medicine, etc. Photographed from life by Lock and Whitfield, with brief biographical notices by Thompson Cooper." (London, 1876-1883).
EN_01350909_0094 IMA
Henry Fawcett, MP, Professor of Political Economy at Cambridge University, 1876. From "Men of Mark: a gallery of contemporary portraits of men distinguished in the Senate, the Church, in science, literature and art, the army, navy, law, medicine, etc. Photographed from life by Lock and Whitfield, with brief biographical notices by Thompson Cooper." (London, 1876-1883).
EN_01350909_0095 IMA
Hyacinthe Loyson ("Pere Hyacinthe"), French Catholic priest, 1876. From "Men of Mark: a gallery of contemporary portraits of men distinguished in the Senate, the Church, in science, literature and art, the army, navy, law, medicine, etc. Photographed from life by Lock and Whitfield, with brief biographical notices by Thompson Cooper." (London, 1876-1883).
EN_01350909_0096 IMA
Sir William Fergusson, Bart, FRS, Sergeant-Surgeon to the Queen, 1877. From "Men of Mark: a gallery of contemporary portraits of men distinguished in the Senate, the Church, in science, literature and art, the army, navy, law, medicine, etc. Photographed from life by Lock and Whitfield, with brief biographical notices by Thompson Cooper." (London, 1876-1883).
EN_01350909_0097 IMA
Thomas Woolner, RA, Professor of Sculpture at the Royal Academy, 1877. From "Men of Mark: a gallery of contemporary portraits of men distinguished in the Senate, the Church, in science, literature and art, the army, navy, law, medicine, etc. Photographed from life by Lock and Whitfield, with brief biographical notices by Thompson Cooper." (London, 1876-1883).
EN_01350909_0098 IMA
George Campbell, 8th Duke of Argyll, Scottish Liberal politician and writer, 1883. From "Men of Mark: a gallery of contemporary portraits of men distinguished in the Senate, the Church, in science, literature and art, the army, navy, law, medicine, etc. Photographed from life by Lock and Whitfield, with brief biographical notices by Thompson Cooper." (London, 1876-1883).
EN_01350909_0099 IMA
Reverand Charles Haddon Spurgeon, pastor of the Metropolitan Tabernacle, 1880. He preached his first sermon at the age of sixteen, and quickly became known for his oratory skills. People from all walks of life would flock to hear him preach. In 1861 the Metropolitan Tabernacle in Newington opened. This had been specifically built for him, as the halls he preached in could not hold the numbers of people that came to listen. He was minister there until his death. He instigated the establishment of many institutions, such as a pastors' college founded at Camberwell in 1856, which transferred to the Metropolitan Tabernacle in 1861; and an orphanage founded in 1867 at Stockwell. From "Men of Mark: a gallery of contemporary portraits of men distinguished in the Senate, the Church, in science, literature and art, the army, navy, law, medicine, etc. Photographed from life by Lock and Whitfield, with brief biographical notices by Thompson Cooper. (Conducted by G. C. Whitfield.) (London, 1876-1883).
EN_01350909_0100 IMA
Samuel Morley, MP, industrialist and politician, 1882. Morley (1809-1886) was the owner of a large and profitable woollen manufacturing business which employed thousands of workers in the East Midlands. Regarded as a model employer, Morley was also an active philanthropist. Politically a Liberal and a strong supporter of Gladstone, he was first elected to Parliament as member for Nottingham in 1865. From 1868-1885 he represented one of the Bristol constituencies.
EN_01350909_0101 IMA
Warren de la Rue, British astronomer and physicist, 1882. De La Rue (1815-1889) was a brilliant astronomer who discovered 525 nebulae. A pioneer of astronomical photography, he invented the photoheliograph, a device which allowed the Sun to be mapped using photography. De la Rue also invented the silver chloride battery, researched the discharge of electricity in gases and carried out research on photo-active chemicals and the wave theory of light. From "Men of Mark: a gallery of contemporary portraits of men distinguished in the Senate, the Church, in science, literature and art, the army, navy, law, medicine, etc. Photographed from life by Lock and Whitfield, with brief biographical notices by Thompson Cooper. (Conducted by G. C. Whitfield.) (London, 1876-1883).
EN_01350909_0102 IMA
Charles II, King of England, Scotland and Ireland, (19th century). After the execution of his father, Charles I, in 1649 during the English Civil War, Charles II (1630-1685) went into exile. After the death of Oliver Cromwell and the fall of the Protectorate in 1659 a restoration of the monarchy was negotiated and Charles made a triumphal entry into London on 29 May 1660, his birthday.
EN_01350909_0103 IMA
After the execution of his father, Charles I, in 1649 during the English Civil War, Charles II (1630-1685) went into exile. After the death of Oliver Cromwell and the fall of the Protectorate in 1659 a restoration of the monarchy was negotiated and Charles made a triumphal entry into London on 29 May 1660, his birthday.
EN_01350909_0104 IMA
William III, King of England, Scotland and Ireland, (19th century). William of Orange (1650-1702) was invited by a conspiracy of English notables to depose the Catholic James II and assume the throne in his stead. The invasion, which was virtually bloodless, was successful and became known as the 'Glorious Revolution'. James fled to France and the Prince of Orange was crowned William III of Great Britain and Ireland on 11 April 1689. He co-ruled with his wife Mary II from 1689, continuing as sole ruler after her death in 1694.
EN_01350909_0105 IMA
Alexander III, King of Scotland. Alexander III (1241-1286) succeeded his father Alexander II as King of the Scots in 1249. His reign saw the acquisition by Scotland of the Isle of Man and the Western Isles from Norway.
EN_01350909_0106 IMA
Francis I, King of France, (1807). Francis (1494-1547) ruled France from 1515. He is regarded as France's fist Renaissance monarch and his kingdom underwent great cultural advances during his reign. In foreign policy he was a contemporary and rival of Charles V of Spain and Henry VIII of England.
EN_01350909_0107 IMA
Henry V, King of England, (1803). The son of Henry IV, Henry (1387-1422) became king in 1413. He is popularly regarded as one of England's greatest kings, primarily because of his exploits in war against the French, beginning with his victory at Agincourt in 1415.
EN_01350909_0108 IMA
Henry V, King of England, (1788). The son of Henry IV, Henry (1387-1422) became king in 1413. He is popularly regarded as one of England's greatest kings, primarily because of his exploits in war against the French, beginning with his victory at Agincourt in 1415.
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Rene Descartes, French philosopher, mathematician, and scientist, c19th century. Regarded as one of the great figures in the history of Western thought, Descartes (1596-1650) is widely considered to be the father of modern philosophy.
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Anne Genevieve of Bourbon-Conde, Duchess of Longueville. Anne Genevieve de Bourbon-Conde (1619-1679) was the daughter of Henri II de Bourbon, Prince of Conde and Charlotte-Marguerite de Montmorency. In 1642 she married Henri II d'Orleans, Duke of Longueville, who was Governor of Normandy and a widower twice her age. She came to prominence in court circles after her brother, Louis, the Great Conde, won the Battle of Rocroi in 1643. Disgraced after her involvement in the Fronde, the rebellion and civil war that broke out in France in 1648-1653, she was later pardoned by Louis XIV.
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After the attack of Good Friday, St-Gervais, Paris, World War I, 29 March 1918 (1929). A shell from a German long-range gun struck the roof of the Church of St Gervais-et-St Protais on 29 March 1918, killing over 100 people.
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Lovell Harrison Rousseau, Union Major General, 1862-1867. An engraving from volume III of "The War with the South : a History of the Late Rebellion", by Robert Tomes, Benjamin G Smith, New York, Virtue & Yorston, 3 Volumes, 1862-1867.
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Joseph Addison, English politician and writer. Addison (1672-1719) was a friend of Richard Steele and Jonathan Swift and edited "The Spectator" with Steele in 1711-1712.
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Charles IX, King of France, (1805). Charles IX, (1550-1574) was a member of the Valois Dynasty. He ruled France from 1560 until his death. He was king at the time of the St Bartholomew's Day Massacre (1572), but historians are divided over his responsibility for it.
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Women in traditional dress, Marken Island, Netherlands, 1898. The former island of Marken is a peninsula, now connected to the North Holland mainland by a causeway. It is well-known for its characteristic wooden houses. Illustration from a book of photographs taken in Holland and Belgium by James Batkin, (1898).
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Marken Island, Netherlands, 1898. The former island of Marken is a peninsula, now connected to the North Holland mainland by a causeway. It is well-known for its characteristic wooden houses. Illustration from a book of photographs taken in Holland and Belgium by James Batkin, (1898).
EN_01350909_0117 IMA
Canal boat, Marken Island, Netherlands, 1898. The former island of Marken is a peninsula, now connected to the North Holland mainland by a causeway. Illustration from a book of photographs taken in Holland and Belgium by James Batkin, (1898).
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People and dogcart, Antwerp, 1898. Illustration from a book of photographs taken in Holland and Belgium by James Batkin, (1898).
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Garden, Japan. Hand-tinted picture postcard.
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The chief military commanders of the Thirty Years War, 1618-1648 (1903). Albrecht von Wallenstein; Johann Tserclaes, Count of Tilly; Gustavus Adolphus, King of Sweden; Bernhard of Saxe-Weimar. A print from "The World's History, A Survey of Man's Record", by Dr HF Helmolt, Volume II, William Heinemann, London, 1903.
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Albrecht von Wallenstein, Bohemian soldier and politician, (1903). Wallenstein (1583-1634) commanded the Catholic imperial armies during the Thirty Years War (1618-1648) until pressure from German princes persuaded the Habsburg emperor Ferdinand II to replace him with Count Tilly in 1630. He was assassinated after mounting a rebellion against the emperor in 1634. A print from "The World's History, A Survey of Man's Record", by Dr HF Helmolt, Volume II, William Heinemann, London, 1903.
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The Duke of Newcastle and Lord Holland, 1761 (c1905). Satirical electioneering card. Print published in "Parliament Past and Present" by Arnold Wright and Philip Smith, (London, c1905).
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'An Arab Sheik', 19th century. Hand-coloured later.
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Leonardo da Vinci, (1452-1519). Portrait of Leonardo. Hand-coloured later.
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William Holman Hunt, British painter, c1890. Hunt (1827-1910) was one of the founders of the Pre-Raphaelite Brotherhood. A lithograph from "The Modern Portrait Gallery", Cassell, Petter and Galpin, London, Paris and New York, c1890.
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Maximillian I, Holy Roman Emperor. Maximilian I (1459-1519) was Holy Roman Emperor from 1493-1519. He established the Habsburg dynasty as an international European power.
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Napoleon III, Emperor of France, 1853. Charles Louis Napoleon Bonaparte (1808-1873) was President of the French Second Republic from 1849 until 1852, when he restored the French Empire and ruled as Napoleon III. He was forced into exile after France's defeat in the Franco-Prussian War of 1870-1871. A print from the "Illustrated London News", (5 February 1853).
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'The Tower of Galata, Constantinople', 1900. The Galata Tower was built as Christea Turris (Tower of Christ) in 1348. It stands in Istanbul, Turkey, and dominates the skyline on the Galata side of the Golden Horn. A print from "The Life and Times of Queen Victoria", by Robert Wilson, Volume IV, (Cassell and Company, London, Paris, New York, Melbourne, 1900).

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