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Prohibicja w USA (24)

EN_01305614_0001 MDR
Cases of whiskey confiscated by the U.S. Internal Revenue Bureau / IT???S A SIGHT that will have alcohol lovers across the country letting out a small whimper ??" as hundreds of gallons of beer is poured out of barrels and down the drain during America???s infamous prohibition era. The video, taken in an illegal brewery during the 1920s, shows U.S. Federal agents using axes to smash open wooden barrels full of beer, much to the dismay of the majority of the American population at the time. The clip then sees the agents pouring any and all liquid they can get their hands on down the drain, as American law enforcement continued their never-ending fight to rid the streets of alcohol / Public Domain / mediadrumworld.com
EN_01305614_0002 MDR
Public Safety Director, Smedley D. "Duckboards" Butler, destroying kegs of beer with an axe / IT???S A SIGHT that will have alcohol lovers across the country letting out a small whimper ??" as hundreds of gallons of beer is poured out of barrels and down the drain during America???s infamous prohibition era. The video, taken in an illegal brewery during the 1920s, shows U.S. Federal agents using axes to smash open wooden barrels full of beer, much to the dismay of the majority of the American population at the time. The clip then sees the agents pouring any and all liquid they can get their hands on down the drain, as American law enforcement continued their never-ending fight to rid the streets of alcohol / Public Domain / mediadrumworld.com
EN_01305614_0003 MDR
Policeman standing alongside wrecked car and cases of moonshine / IT???S A SIGHT that will have alcohol lovers across the country letting out a small whimper ??" as hundreds of gallons of beer is poured out of barrels and down the drain during America???s infamous prohibition era. The video, taken in an illegal brewery during the 1920s, shows U.S. Federal agents using axes to smash open wooden barrels full of beer, much to the dismay of the majority of the American population at the time. The clip then sees the agents pouring any and all liquid they can get their hands on down the drain, as American law enforcement continued their never-ending fight to rid the streets of alcohol / Public Domain / mediadrumworld.com
EN_01305614_0004 MDR
Barrels of confiscatedliquor in building / IT???S A SIGHT that will have alcohol lovers across the country letting out a small whimper ??" as hundreds of gallons of beer is poured out of barrels and down the drain during America???s infamous prohibition era. The video, taken in an illegal brewery during the 1920s, shows U.S. Federal agents using axes to smash open wooden barrels full of beer, much to the dismay of the majority of the American population at the time. The clip then sees the agents pouring any and all liquid they can get their hands on down the drain, as American law enforcement continued their never-ending fight to rid the streets of alcohol / Public Domain / mediadrumworld.com
EN_01305614_0005 MDR
Woman seated at a soda fountain table is pouring alcohol into a cup from a cane, during Prohibition / IT???S A SIGHT that will have alcohol lovers across the country letting out a small whimper ??" as hundreds of gallons of beer is poured out of barrels and down the drain during America???s infamous prohibition era. The video, taken in an illegal brewery during the 1920s, shows U.S. Federal agents using axes to smash open wooden barrels full of beer, much to the dismay of the majority of the American population at the time. The clip then sees the agents pouring any and all liquid they can get their hands on down the drain, as American law enforcement continued their never-ending fight to rid the streets of alcohol / Public Domain / mediadrumworld.com
EN_01305614_0006 MDR
New York City Deputy Police Commissioner John A. Leach, right, watching agents pour liquor into sewer following a raid during the height of prohibition / IT???S A SIGHT that will have alcohol lovers across the country letting out a small whimper ??" as hundreds of gallons of beer is poured out of barrels and down the drain during America???s infamous prohibition era. The video, taken in an illegal brewery during the 1920s, shows U.S. Federal agents using axes to smash open wooden barrels full of beer, much to the dismay of the majority of the American population at the time. The clip then sees the agents pouring any and all liquid they can get their hands on down the drain, as American law enforcement continued their never-ending fight to rid the streets of alcohol / Public Domain / mediadrumworld.com
EN_01305614_0007 MDR
Hooch Hound, a dog trained to detect liquor, sniffs at flask in back pocket of man, seated, fishing on pier on the Potomac River / IT???S A SIGHT that will have alcohol lovers across the country letting out a small whimper ??" as hundreds of gallons of beer is poured out of barrels and down the drain during America???s infamous prohibition era. The video, taken in an illegal brewery during the 1920s, shows U.S. Federal agents using axes to smash open wooden barrels full of beer, much to the dismay of the majority of the American population at the time. The clip then sees the agents pouring any and all liquid they can get their hands on down the drain, as American law enforcement continued their never-ending fight to rid the streets of alcohol / Public Domain / mediadrumworld.com
EN_01305614_0008 MDR
Two men pouring liquor into storm drain / IT???S A SIGHT that will have alcohol lovers across the country letting out a small whimper ??" as hundreds of gallons of beer is poured out of barrels and down the drain during America???s infamous prohibition era. The video, taken in an illegal brewery during the 1920s, shows U.S. Federal agents using axes to smash open wooden barrels full of beer, much to the dismay of the majority of the American population at the time. The clip then sees the agents pouring any and all liquid they can get their hands on down the drain, as American law enforcement continued their never-ending fight to rid the streets of alcohol / Public Domain / mediadrumworld.com
EN_01305614_0009 MDR
Prohibition officers raiding the lunch room of 922 Pa. Ave., Wash., D.C / IT???S A SIGHT that will have alcohol lovers across the country letting out a small whimper ??" as hundreds of gallons of beer is poured out of barrels and down the drain during America???s infamous prohibition era. The video, taken in an illegal brewery during the 1920s, shows U.S. Federal agents using axes to smash open wooden barrels full of beer, much to the dismay of the majority of the American population at the time. The clip then sees the agents pouring any and all liquid they can get their hands on down the drain, as American law enforcement continued their never-ending fight to rid the streets of alcohol / Public Domain / mediadrumworld.com
EN_01305614_0010 MDR
Men standing in warehouse with cases of confiscated liquor / IT???S A SIGHT that will have alcohol lovers across the country letting out a small whimper ??" as hundreds of gallons of beer is poured out of barrels and down the drain during America???s infamous prohibition era. The video, taken in an illegal brewery during the 1920s, shows U.S. Federal agents using axes to smash open wooden barrels full of beer, much to the dismay of the majority of the American population at the time. The clip then sees the agents pouring any and all liquid they can get their hands on down the drain, as American law enforcement continued their never-ending fight to rid the streets of alcohol / Public Domain / mediadrumworld.com
EN_01305614_0011 MDR
80,000 pint bottles of beer are destroyed / IT???S A SIGHT that will have alcohol lovers across the country letting out a small whimper ??" as hundreds of gallons of beer is poured out of barrels and down the drain during America???s infamous prohibition era. The video, taken in an illegal brewery during the 1920s, shows U.S. Federal agents using axes to smash open wooden barrels full of beer, much to the dismay of the majority of the American population at the time. The clip then sees the agents pouring any and all liquid they can get their hands on down the drain, as American law enforcement continued their never-ending fight to rid the streets of alcohol / Public Domain / mediadrumworld.com
EN_01305614_0012 MDR
Two men posing with a whiskey still / IT???S A SIGHT that will have alcohol lovers across the country letting out a small whimper ??" as hundreds of gallons of beer is poured out of barrels and down the drain during America???s infamous prohibition era. The video, taken in an illegal brewery during the 1920s, shows U.S. Federal agents using axes to smash open wooden barrels full of beer, much to the dismay of the majority of the American population at the time. The clip then sees the agents pouring any and all liquid they can get their hands on down the drain, as American law enforcement continued their never-ending fight to rid the streets of alcohol / Public Domain / mediadrumworld.com
! EN_01313739_0002 POE
December 5, 1933- St. Louis, Missouri, United States: Saloonkeeper Leo J. Sullivan pours legal whiskey at his tavern at 226 Collinsville Avenue in East St. Louis shortly after national Prohibition officially was repealed on Dec. 5, 1933. Illinois was ready, but the Missouri Legislature's "dry" members stalled full repeal in Missouri until January 1934. The Cullen–Harrison Act, named for its sponsors, Senator Pat Harrison and Representative Thomas H. Cullen, enacted by the United States Congress March 21, 1933 and signed by President Franklin D. Roosevelt the following day, legalized the sale in the United States of beer with an alcohol content of 3.2% (by weight) and wine of similarly low alcohol content, thought to be too low to be intoxicating, effective April 7, 1933. Upon signing the legislation, Roosevelt made his famous remark, "I think this would be a good time for a beer." According to the Cullen-Harrison Act, states had to pass their own similar legislation to legalize sale of the low alcohol beverages within their borders. Roosevelt had previously sent a short message to Congress requesting such a bill. Sale of even low alcohol beer had been illegal in the U.S. since Prohibition started in 1920 following the 1919 passage of the Volstead Act. On April 7, 1933, throngs gathered outside breweries and taverns for their first legal beer in 13 years. The passage of the Cullen–Harrison Act is celebrated as National Beer Day every year on April 7 in the United States. (St. Louis Post dispatch/Polaris)
! EN_01313739_0001 POE
April 7, 1933 - St. Louis, Missouri, United States: Barmaid Orpha Matthews serves beer in the diner at the American Hotel Annex, 615 Walnut Street. By noon on April 7, 1933, St. Louisans had drunk the first batch dry. Calls for more swamped the switchboards at the Anheuser-Busch and Falstaff breweries, the only ones ready for legal beer. The Cullen–Harrison Act, named for its sponsors, Senator Pat Harrison and Representative Thomas H. Cullen, enacted by the United States Congress March 21, 1933 and signed by President Franklin D. Roosevelt the following day, legalized the sale in the United States of beer with an alcohol content of 3.2% (by weight) and wine of similarly low alcohol content, thought to be too low to be intoxicating, effective April 7, 1933. Upon signing the legislation, Roosevelt made his famous remark, "I think this would be a good time for a beer." According to the Cullen-Harrison Act, states had to pass their own similar legislation to legalize sale of the low alcohol beverages within their borders. Roosevelt had previously sent a short message to Congress requesting such a bill. Sale of even low alcohol beer had been illegal in the U.S. since Prohibition started in 1920 following the 1919 passage of the Volstead Act. On April 7, 1933, throngs gathered outside breweries and taverns for their first legal beer in 13 years. The passage of the Cullen–Harrison Act is celebrated as National Beer Day every year on April 7 in the United States. (St. Louis Post dispatch/Polaris)
! EN_01313739_0004 POE
April 7, 1933 - St. Louis, Missouri, United States: Workers at Anheuser-Busch load another truck in the early hours of April 7, 1933, the first day of legal beer since 1920. Other trucks awaiting loads lined Arsenal almost to Jefferson Avenue. The Cullen–Harrison Act, named for its sponsors, Senator Pat Harrison and Representative Thomas H. Cullen, enacted by the United States Congress March 21, 1933 and signed by President Franklin D. Roosevelt the following day, legalized the sale in the United States of beer with an alcohol content of 3.2% (by weight) and wine of similarly low alcohol content, thought to be too low to be intoxicating, effective April 7, 1933. Upon signing the legislation, Roosevelt made his famous remark, "I think this would be a good time for a beer." According to the Cullen-Harrison Act, states had to pass their own similar legislation to legalize sale of the low alcohol beverages within their borders. Roosevelt had previously sent a short message to Congress requesting such a bill. Sale of even low alcohol beer had been illegal in the U.S. since Prohibition started in 1920 following the 1919 passage of the Volstead Act. On April 7, 1933, throngs gathered outside breweries and taverns for their first legal beer in 13 years. The passage of the Cullen–Harrison Act is celebrated as National Beer Day every year on April 7 in the United States. (St. Louis Post dispatch/Polaris)
! EN_01313739_0005 POE
April 7, 1933 - St. Louis, Missouri, United States: The first wagon filled with beer leaves the Anheuser-Busch brewery, pulled by Clydesdales and recorded by a movie cameraman. The brewery also dispatched a truck to Lambert Field for shipment of beer by air to the White House. August A. "Gussie" Busch praised President Franklin D. Roosevelt for his support during a live national radio broadcast from the brewery at midnight. The Cullen–Harrison Act, named for its sponsors, Senator Pat Harrison and Representative Thomas H. Cullen, enacted by the United States Congress March 21, 1933 and signed by President Franklin D. Roosevelt the following day, legalized the sale in the United States of beer with an alcohol content of 3.2% (by weight) and wine of similarly low alcohol content, thought to be too low to be intoxicating, effective April 7, 1933. Upon signing the legislation, Roosevelt made his famous remark, "I think this would be a good time for a beer." According to the Cullen-Harrison Act, states had to pass their own similar legislation to legalize sale of the low alcohol beverages within their borders. Roosevelt had previously sent a short message to Congress requesting such a bill. Sale of even low alcohol beer had been illegal in the U.S. since Prohibition started in 1920 following the 1919 passage of the Volstead Act. On April 7, 1933, throngs gathered outside breweries and taverns for their first legal beer in 13 years. The passage of the Cullen–Harrison Act is celebrated as National Beer Day every year on April 7 in the United States. (St. Louis Post dispatch/Polaris)
! EN_01313739_0008 POE
April 7, 1933 - St. Louis, Missouri, United States: A scene from the party at the Hotel Jefferson, 12th (now Tucker) Boulevard at Locust Street, in the first hour of April 7, 1933. More than 600 people had made reservations for the ballroom in anticipation of legal beer, and cheered loudly when the first deliveries pulled up outside. The Cullen–Harrison Act, named for its sponsors, Senator Pat Harrison and Representative Thomas H. Cullen, enacted by the United States Congress March 21, 1933 and signed by President Franklin D. Roosevelt the following day, legalized the sale in the United States of beer with an alcohol content of 3.2% (by weight) and wine of similarly low alcohol content, thought to be too low to be intoxicating, effective April 7, 1933. Upon signing the legislation, Roosevelt made his famous remark, "I think this would be a good time for a beer." According to the Cullen-Harrison Act, states had to pass their own similar legislation to legalize sale of the low alcohol beverages within their borders. Roosevelt had previously sent a short message to Congress requesting such a bill. Sale of even low alcohol beer had been illegal in the U.S. since Prohibition started in 1920 following the 1919 passage of the Volstead Act.[3] On April 7, 1933, throngs gathered outside breweries and taverns for their first legal beer in 13 years.[4] The passage of the Cullen–Harrison Act is celebrated as National Beer Day every year on April 7 in the United States. (St Louis Post-Dispatch / Polaris)
! EN_01313739_0009 POE
April 7, 1933 - St. Louis, Missouri, United States: St. Louis Mayor-elect Bernard F. Dickmann (left) makes the first toast of legal beer at the Elks Club, 3619 Lindell Boulevard. The first beer truck arrived there at 12:08 a.m. April 7, 1933. Dickmann declined calls for a speech, preferring to let his fellow Elks savor their beer. The Cullen–Harrison Act, named for its sponsors, Senator Pat Harrison and Representative Thomas H. Cullen, enacted by the United States Congress March 21, 1933 and signed by President Franklin D. Roosevelt the following day, legalized the sale in the United States of beer with an alcohol content of 3.2% (by weight) and wine of similarly low alcohol content, thought to be too low to be intoxicating, effective April 7, 1933. Upon signing the legislation, Roosevelt made his famous remark, "I think this would be a good time for a beer." According to the Cullen-Harrison Act, states had to pass their own similar legislation to legalize sale of the low alcohol beverages within their borders. Roosevelt had previously sent a short message to Congress requesting such a bill. Sale of even low alcohol beer had been illegal in the U.S. since Prohibition started in 1920 following the 1919 passage of the Volstead Act. On April 7, 1933, throngs gathered outside breweries and taverns for their first legal beer in 13 years. The passage of the Cullen–Harrison Act is celebrated as National Beer Day every year on April 7 in the United States. (St. Louis Post dispatch/Polaris)
! EN_01313739_0012 POE
April 7, 1933 - St. Louis, Missouri, United States: A waiter in a downtown hotel serves his happy customers in the early hours of April 7, 1933. Most of the hotels were crowded with people who awaited the first shipments from the city's two breweries. The Cullen–Harrison Act, named for its sponsors, Senator Pat Harrison and Representative Thomas H. Cullen, enacted by the United States Congress March 21, 1933 and signed by President Franklin D. Roosevelt the following day, legalized the sale in the United States of beer with an alcohol content of 3.2% (by weight) and wine of similarly low alcohol content, thought to be too low to be intoxicating, effective April 7, 1933. Upon signing the legislation, Roosevelt made his famous remark, "I think this would be a good time for a beer." According to the Cullen-Harrison Act, states had to pass their own similar legislation to legalize sale of the low alcohol beverages within their borders. Roosevelt had previously sent a short message to Congress requesting such a bill. Sale of even low alcohol beer had been illegal in the U.S. since Prohibition started in 1920 following the 1919 passage of the Volstead Act. On April 7, 1933, throngs gathered outside breweries and taverns for their first legal beer in 13 years. The passage of the Cullen–Harrison Act is celebrated as National Beer Day every year on April 7 in the United States. (St. Louis Post dispatch/Polaris)
! EN_01313739_0003 POE
April 6, 1933- St. Louis, Missouri, United States: Some of the 25,000 people gathering outside the Anheuser-Busch Co. brewery, South Broadway and Arsenal Streets, on the evening of April 6, 1933. Beer sales would become legal at midnight, and the brewery was ready with 45,000 cases of bottles and 3,000 half-barrels stored in the plant. The trucks would roll at midnight. Other trucks awaiting loading lined Arsenal almost to Jefferson Avenue. Another 10,000 people awaited the first deliveries from Joseph Griesedieck's Falstaff brewery at Forest Park and Spring avenues. (St Louis Post-Dispatch / Polaris)
MINIMUM PRICE 50 USD!!!
! EN_01313739_0006 POE
April 2, 1933 - St. Louis, Missouri, United States: Potential beer retailers also needed a federal permit, obtainable from the office of Louis J. Becker, U.S. Internal Revenue collector for the St. Louis District. The scene is in the hallway outside his office in the Federal Building at Eighth and Olive streets, now called the Old Post Office, on April 2, 1933, four days before beer sales would be legal. The office issued more than 3,763 permits, most of them for St. Louis establishments. The Cullen–Harrison Act, named for its sponsors, Senator Pat Harrison and Representative Thomas H. Cullen, enacted by the United States Congress March 21, 1933 and signed by President Franklin D. Roosevelt the following day, legalized the sale in the United States of beer with an alcohol content of 3.2% (by weight) and wine of similarly low alcohol content, thought to be too low to be intoxicating, effective April 7, 1933. Upon signing the legislation, Roosevelt made his famous remark, "I think this would be a good time for a beer." According to the Cullen-Harrison Act, states had to pass their own similar legislation to legalize sale of the low alcohol beverages within their borders. Roosevelt had previously sent a short message to Congress requesting such a bill. Sale of even low alcohol beer had been illegal in the U.S. since Prohibition started in 1920 following the 1919 passage of the Volstead Act. On April 7, 1933, throngs gathered outside breweries and taverns for their first legal beer in 13 years. The passage of the Cullen–Harrison Act is celebrated as National Beer Day every year on April 7 in the United States. (St. Louis Post dispatch/Polaris)
! EN_01313739_0010 POE
March 23, 1933 - St. Louis, Missouri, United States: Seekers of permits to sell beer with 3.2 percent alcohol content line up on March 23, 1933, at the desk of B.J. Carragher, a state official, in his office in the Chemical Building downtown, at 721 Olive Street. The Congress elected in November 1932 along with President Franklin D. Roosevelt was strongly "wet," and moved quickly to rewrite the federal statute enforcing Prohibition to permit the manufacture of beer. Repealing Prohibition on all liquor would have to await an amendment to the U.S. Constitution. Carragher worked for the Missouri Pure Food and Drug Department, which issued permits after the Missouri Legislature agreed to go along with 3.2 beer. The Cullen–Harrison Act, named for its sponsors, Senator Pat Harrison and Representative Thomas H. Cullen, enacted by the United States Congress March 21, 1933 and signed by President Franklin D. Roosevelt the following day, legalized the sale in the United States of beer with an alcohol content of 3.2% (by weight) and wine of similarly low alcohol content, thought to be too low to be intoxicating, effective April 7, 1933. Upon signing the legislation, Roosevelt made his famous remark, "I think this would be a good time for a beer." According to the Cullen-Harrison Act, states had to pass their own similar legislation to legalize sale of the low alcohol beverages within their borders. Roosevelt had previously sent a short message to Congress requesting such a bill. Sale of even low alcohol beer had been illegal in the U.S. since Prohibition started in 1920 following the 1919 passage of the Volstead Act. On April 7, 1933, throngs gathered outside breweries and taverns for their first legal beer in 13 years. The passage of the Cullen–Harrison Act is celebrated as National Beer Day every year on April 7 in the United States. (St. Louis Post dispatch/Polaris)
! EN_01313739_0007 POE
May 1927 - Madison, Missouri, United States: Federal Prohibition agents pose next to one of the tanks at an illegal distillery they raided in May 1927 in Madison. They said the still, in a one-story frame building at 208 State Street, held vats that could hold 30,000 gallons of mash. No matter how many stills they raided, moonshiners quickly built replacements. The Cullen–Harrison Act, named for its sponsors, Senator Pat Harrison and Representative Thomas H. Cullen, enacted by the United States Congress March 21, 1933 and signed by President Franklin D. Roosevelt the following day, legalized the sale in the United States of beer with an alcohol content of 3.2% (by weight) and wine of similarly low alcohol content, thought to be too low to be intoxicating, effective April 7, 1933. Upon signing the legislation, Roosevelt made his famous remark, "I think this would be a good time for a beer." According to the Cullen-Harrison Act, states had to pass their own similar legislation to legalize sale of the low alcohol beverages within their borders. Roosevelt had previously sent a short message to Congress requesting such a bill. Sale of even low alcohol beer had been illegal in the U.S. since Prohibition started in 1920 following the 1919 passage of the Volstead Act. On April 7, 1933, throngs gathered outside breweries and taverns for their first legal beer in 13 years. The passage of the Cullen–Harrison Act is celebrated as National Beer Day every year on April 7 in the United States. (St. Louis Post dispatch/Polaris)
! EN_01313739_0011 POE
1932 - New York, New York, United States: Drinkers in a local speakeasy toast the anticipated end of Prohibition some time in late 1932. Debate began in Congress in December 1932, and a proposed 21st Amendment to abolish the 18th was sent to the states three months later. While state legislatures were considering repeal, Congress abolished the federal Volstead Act, the enforcement statute for Prohibition. Getting rid of Volstead allowed for the sale of 3.2 beer beginning April 7, 1933. The 21st Amendment went into effect on Dec. 5, 1933. Illinois went fully wet immediately, but the Missouri Legislature dithered for a month before allowing full fare in taverns. The Cullen–Harrison Act, named for its sponsors, Senator Pat Harrison and Representative Thomas H. Cullen, enacted by the United States Congress March 21, 1933 and signed by President Franklin D. Roosevelt the following day, legalized the sale in the United States of beer with an alcohol content of 3.2% (by weight) and wine of similarly low alcohol content, thought to be too low to be intoxicating, effective April 7, 1933. Upon signing the legislation, Roosevelt made his famous remark, "I think this would be a good time for a beer." According to the Cullen-Harrison Act, states had to pass their own similar legislation to legalize sale of the low alcohol beverages within their borders. Roosevelt had previously sent a short message to Congress requesting such a bill. Sale of even low alcohol beer had been illegal in the U.S. since Prohibition started in 1920 following the 1919 passage of the Volstead Act. On April 7, 1933, throngs gathered outside breweries and taverns for their first legal beer in 13 years. The passage of the Cullen–Harrison Act is celebrated as National Beer Day every year on April 7 in the United States. (St. Louis Post dispatch/Polaris)
FILE PHOTO 1932 MINIMUM PRICE 50 USD!!!
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