poniedziałek, 23 lipca 2018
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EN_01293179_0003 COV
A sphinx head has been uncovered - from under the sand dunes of CALIFORNIA. It was announced this week (27 Nov) the perfectly intact 300 pound plaster sphinx head has been unearthed by archaeologists excavating Cecil B. DeMille???s 95-year-old movie set for The Ten Commandments buried in the Guadalupe-Nipomo Dunes. ??sThe piece is unlike anything found on previous digs,??? said Doug Jenzen, Executive Director of the Dunes Center. ??sThe majority of it is preserved by sand with the original paint still intact. This is significant and shows that we???re still learning unexpected facets to film historical movie production such as the fact that objects in black and white films were actually painted extremely intense colors.??? The story of ??sThe Lost City of DeMille??? dates to 1923, when the legendary director ordered the construction of a lavish Egyptian set including pharaohs, sphinxes, and colossal temple gates, for his silent movie spectacle ??sThe Ten Commandments.??? Legend has it that after filming, it was too expensive to move and too valuable to leave for rival filmmakers to poach??"so DeMille had it buried. In the 1980s, director Peter Brosnan and a group of young filmmakers set out to find the ruins. Over 30 years later, excavations began, and have since turned up a trove of historical artifacts including an entire sphinx broken into pieces. Everyday relics??"prohibition liquor bottles, makeup, and tobacco tins??"have also been found, shedding light on what life was like for the cast and crew in 1923. Recently, as archeologists worked to excavate the remainder of a sphinx body left from a previous dig, they were shocked to find the beautifully intact 5 ?? x 3 x 8 foot sphinx head hidden beneath the sand. In all, 21 sphinxes graced the immense movie set, which was designed by Paul Iribe, known as ??sthe Father of Art Deco.??? It towered 12 stories high and 800 feet wide. Only a fraction of the set has been recovered. History of the project is recou
MANDATORY CREDIT: Dunes Center/Cover Images. Editorial use only
EN_01293179_0002 COV
A sphinx head has been uncovered - from under the sand dunes of CALIFORNIA. It was announced this week (27 Nov) the perfectly intact 300 pound plaster sphinx head has been unearthed by archaeologists excavating Cecil B. DeMille???s 95-year-old movie set for The Ten Commandments buried in the Guadalupe-Nipomo Dunes. ??sThe piece is unlike anything found on previous digs,??? said Doug Jenzen, Executive Director of the Dunes Center. ??sThe majority of it is preserved by sand with the original paint still intact. This is significant and shows that we???re still learning unexpected facets to film historical movie production such as the fact that objects in black and white films were actually painted extremely intense colors.??? The story of ??sThe Lost City of DeMille??? dates to 1923, when the legendary director ordered the construction of a lavish Egyptian set including pharaohs, sphinxes, and colossal temple gates, for his silent movie spectacle ??sThe Ten Commandments.??? Legend has it that after filming, it was too expensive to move and too valuable to leave for rival filmmakers to poach??"so DeMille had it buried. In the 1980s, director Peter Brosnan and a group of young filmmakers set out to find the ruins. Over 30 years later, excavations began, and have since turned up a trove of historical artifacts including an entire sphinx broken into pieces. Everyday relics??"prohibition liquor bottles, makeup, and tobacco tins??"have also been found, shedding light on what life was like for the cast and crew in 1923. Recently, as archeologists worked to excavate the remainder of a sphinx body left from a previous dig, they were shocked to find the beautifully intact 5 ?? x 3 x 8 foot sphinx head hidden beneath the sand. In all, 21 sphinxes graced the immense movie set, which was designed by Paul Iribe, known as ??sthe Father of Art Deco.??? It towered 12 stories high and 800 feet wide. Only a fraction of the set has been recovered. History of the project is recou
MANDATORY CREDIT: Dunes Center/Cover Images. Editorial use only
EN_01293179_0004 COV
A sphinx head has been uncovered - from under the sand dunes of CALIFORNIA. It was announced this week (27 Nov) the perfectly intact 300 pound plaster sphinx head has been unearthed by archaeologists excavating Cecil B. DeMille???s 95-year-old movie set for The Ten Commandments buried in the Guadalupe-Nipomo Dunes. ??sThe piece is unlike anything found on previous digs,??? said Doug Jenzen, Executive Director of the Dunes Center. ??sThe majority of it is preserved by sand with the original paint still intact. This is significant and shows that we???re still learning unexpected facets to film historical movie production such as the fact that objects in black and white films were actually painted extremely intense colors.??? The story of ??sThe Lost City of DeMille??? dates to 1923, when the legendary director ordered the construction of a lavish Egyptian set including pharaohs, sphinxes, and colossal temple gates, for his silent movie spectacle ??sThe Ten Commandments.??? Legend has it that after filming, it was too expensive to move and too valuable to leave for rival filmmakers to poach??"so DeMille had it buried. In the 1980s, director Peter Brosnan and a group of young filmmakers set out to find the ruins. Over 30 years later, excavations began, and have since turned up a trove of historical artifacts including an entire sphinx broken into pieces. Everyday relics??"prohibition liquor bottles, makeup, and tobacco tins??"have also been found, shedding light on what life was like for the cast and crew in 1923. Recently, as archeologists worked to excavate the remainder of a sphinx body left from a previous dig, they were shocked to find the beautifully intact 5 ?? x 3 x 8 foot sphinx head hidden beneath the sand. In all, 21 sphinxes graced the immense movie set, which was designed by Paul Iribe, known as ??sthe Father of Art Deco.??? It towered 12 stories high and 800 feet wide. Only a fraction of the set has been recovered. History of the project is recou
MANDATORY CREDIT: Dunes Center/Cover Images. Editorial use only
EN_01293179_0001 COV
A sphinx head has been uncovered - from under the sand dunes of CALIFORNIA. It was announced this week (27 Nov) the perfectly intact 300 pound plaster sphinx head has been unearthed by archaeologists excavating Cecil B. DeMille???s 95-year-old movie set for The Ten Commandments buried in the Guadalupe-Nipomo Dunes. ??sThe piece is unlike anything found on previous digs,??? said Doug Jenzen, Executive Director of the Dunes Center. ??sThe majority of it is preserved by sand with the original paint still intact. This is significant and shows that we???re still learning unexpected facets to film historical movie production such as the fact that objects in black and white films were actually painted extremely intense colors.??? The story of ??sThe Lost City of DeMille??? dates to 1923, when the legendary director ordered the construction of a lavish Egyptian set including pharaohs, sphinxes, and colossal temple gates, for his silent movie spectacle ??sThe Ten Commandments.??? Legend has it that after filming, it was too expensive to move and too valuable to leave for rival filmmakers to poach??"so DeMille had it buried. In the 1980s, director Peter Brosnan and a group of young filmmakers set out to find the ruins. Over 30 years later, excavations began, and have since turned up a trove of historical artifacts including an entire sphinx broken into pieces. Everyday relics??"prohibition liquor bottles, makeup, and tobacco tins??"have also been found, shedding light on what life was like for the cast and crew in 1923. Recently, as archeologists worked to excavate the remainder of a sphinx body left from a previous dig, they were shocked to find the beautifully intact 5 ?? x 3 x 8 foot sphinx head hidden beneath the sand. In all, 21 sphinxes graced the immense movie set, which was designed by Paul Iribe, known as ??sthe Father of Art Deco.??? It towered 12 stories high and 800 feet wide. Only a fraction of the set has been recovered. History of the project is recou
MANDATORY CREDIT: Dunes Center/Cover Images. Editorial use only
EN_01293179_0005 COV
A sphinx head has been uncovered - from under the sand dunes of CALIFORNIA. It was announced this week (27 Nov) the perfectly intact 300 pound plaster sphinx head has been unearthed by archaeologists excavating Cecil B. DeMille???s 95-year-old movie set for The Ten Commandments buried in the Guadalupe-Nipomo Dunes. ??sThe piece is unlike anything found on previous digs,??? said Doug Jenzen, Executive Director of the Dunes Center. ??sThe majority of it is preserved by sand with the original paint still intact. This is significant and shows that we???re still learning unexpected facets to film historical movie production such as the fact that objects in black and white films were actually painted extremely intense colors.??? The story of ??sThe Lost City of DeMille??? dates to 1923, when the legendary director ordered the construction of a lavish Egyptian set including pharaohs, sphinxes, and colossal temple gates, for his silent movie spectacle ??sThe Ten Commandments.??? Legend has it that after filming, it was too expensive to move and too valuable to leave for rival filmmakers to poach??"so DeMille had it buried. In the 1980s, director Peter Brosnan and a group of young filmmakers set out to find the ruins. Over 30 years later, excavations began, and have since turned up a trove of historical artifacts including an entire sphinx broken into pieces. Everyday relics??"prohibition liquor bottles, makeup, and tobacco tins??"have also been found, shedding light on what life was like for the cast and crew in 1923. Recently, as archeologists worked to excavate the remainder of a sphinx body left from a previous dig, they were shocked to find the beautifully intact 5 ?? x 3 x 8 foot sphinx head hidden beneath the sand. In all, 21 sphinxes graced the immense movie set, which was designed by Paul Iribe, known as ??sthe Father of Art Deco.??? It towered 12 stories high and 800 feet wide. Only a fraction of the set has been recovered. History of the project is recou
MANDATORY CREDIT: Dunes Center/Cover Images. Editorial use only
EN_01293179_0006 COV
A sphinx head has been uncovered - from under the sand dunes of CALIFORNIA. It was announced this week (27 Nov) the perfectly intact 300 pound plaster sphinx head has been unearthed by archaeologists excavating Cecil B. DeMille???s 95-year-old movie set for The Ten Commandments buried in the Guadalupe-Nipomo Dunes. ??sThe piece is unlike anything found on previous digs,??? said Doug Jenzen, Executive Director of the Dunes Center. ??sThe majority of it is preserved by sand with the original paint still intact. This is significant and shows that we???re still learning unexpected facets to film historical movie production such as the fact that objects in black and white films were actually painted extremely intense colors.??? The story of ??sThe Lost City of DeMille??? dates to 1923, when the legendary director ordered the construction of a lavish Egyptian set including pharaohs, sphinxes, and colossal temple gates, for his silent movie spectacle ??sThe Ten Commandments.??? Legend has it that after filming, it was too expensive to move and too valuable to leave for rival filmmakers to poach??"so DeMille had it buried. In the 1980s, director Peter Brosnan and a group of young filmmakers set out to find the ruins. Over 30 years later, excavations began, and have since turned up a trove of historical artifacts including an entire sphinx broken into pieces. Everyday relics??"prohibition liquor bottles, makeup, and tobacco tins??"have also been found, shedding light on what life was like for the cast and crew in 1923. Recently, as archeologists worked to excavate the remainder of a sphinx body left from a previous dig, they were shocked to find the beautifully intact 5 ?? x 3 x 8 foot sphinx head hidden beneath the sand. In all, 21 sphinxes graced the immense movie set, which was designed by Paul Iribe, known as ??sthe Father of Art Deco.??? It towered 12 stories high and 800 feet wide. Only a fraction of the set has been recovered. History of the project is recou
MANDATORY CREDIT: Dunes Center/Cover Images. Editorial use only
EN_01293179_0007 COV
A sphinx head has been uncovered - from under the sand dunes of CALIFORNIA. It was announced this week (27 Nov) the perfectly intact 300 pound plaster sphinx head has been unearthed by archaeologists excavating Cecil B. DeMille???s 95-year-old movie set for The Ten Commandments buried in the Guadalupe-Nipomo Dunes. ??sThe piece is unlike anything found on previous digs,??? said Doug Jenzen, Executive Director of the Dunes Center. ??sThe majority of it is preserved by sand with the original paint still intact. This is significant and shows that we???re still learning unexpected facets to film historical movie production such as the fact that objects in black and white films were actually painted extremely intense colors.??? The story of ??sThe Lost City of DeMille??? dates to 1923, when the legendary director ordered the construction of a lavish Egyptian set including pharaohs, sphinxes, and colossal temple gates, for his silent movie spectacle ??sThe Ten Commandments.??? Legend has it that after filming, it was too expensive to move and too valuable to leave for rival filmmakers to poach??"so DeMille had it buried. In the 1980s, director Peter Brosnan and a group of young filmmakers set out to find the ruins. Over 30 years later, excavations began, and have since turned up a trove of historical artifacts including an entire sphinx broken into pieces. Everyday relics??"prohibition liquor bottles, makeup, and tobacco tins??"have also been found, shedding light on what life was like for the cast and crew in 1923. Recently, as archeologists worked to excavate the remainder of a sphinx body left from a previous dig, they were shocked to find the beautifully intact 5 ?? x 3 x 8 foot sphinx head hidden beneath the sand. In all, 21 sphinxes graced the immense movie set, which was designed by Paul Iribe, known as ??sthe Father of Art Deco.??? It towered 12 stories high and 800 feet wide. Only a fraction of the set has been recovered. History of the project is recou
MANDATORY CREDIT: Dunes Center/Cover Images. Editorial use only
EN_01293179_0008 COV
A sphinx head has been uncovered - from under the sand dunes of CALIFORNIA. It was announced this week (27 Nov) the perfectly intact 300 pound plaster sphinx head has been unearthed by archaeologists excavating Cecil B. DeMille???s 95-year-old movie set for The Ten Commandments buried in the Guadalupe-Nipomo Dunes. ??sThe piece is unlike anything found on previous digs,??? said Doug Jenzen, Executive Director of the Dunes Center. ??sThe majority of it is preserved by sand with the original paint still intact. This is significant and shows that we???re still learning unexpected facets to film historical movie production such as the fact that objects in black and white films were actually painted extremely intense colors.??? The story of ??sThe Lost City of DeMille??? dates to 1923, when the legendary director ordered the construction of a lavish Egyptian set including pharaohs, sphinxes, and colossal temple gates, for his silent movie spectacle ??sThe Ten Commandments.??? Legend has it that after filming, it was too expensive to move and too valuable to leave for rival filmmakers to poach??"so DeMille had it buried. In the 1980s, director Peter Brosnan and a group of young filmmakers set out to find the ruins. Over 30 years later, excavations began, and have since turned up a trove of historical artifacts including an entire sphinx broken into pieces. Everyday relics??"prohibition liquor bottles, makeup, and tobacco tins??"have also been found, shedding light on what life was like for the cast and crew in 1923. Recently, as archeologists worked to excavate the remainder of a sphinx body left from a previous dig, they were shocked to find the beautifully intact 5 ?? x 3 x 8 foot sphinx head hidden beneath the sand. In all, 21 sphinxes graced the immense movie set, which was designed by Paul Iribe, known as ??sthe Father of Art Deco.??? It towered 12 stories high and 800 feet wide. Only a fraction of the set has been recovered. History of the project is recou
MANDATORY CREDIT: Dunes Center/Cover Images. Editorial use only