poniedziałek, 22 stycznia 2018
zamknij [x]
do:

Żuk cyborg (4)

EN_01292903_0001 AWR
Pic shows: The cyborg beetle; Boffins claim to have created the world's smallest disaster squad in the form of cyborg beetles. They believe that the remote-controlled insects which will be fitted with tiny backpacks capable of detecting carbon dioxide will be able to go into the rubble of collapsed buildings following earthquakes or other disasters. Once inside, the carbon monoxide detectors will tell the controllers of the insects if there is a living person breathing, and, if so, in what direction, allowing them to steer the beetle towards whoever is generating the carbon dioxide. And once the victims are discovered, a review in the scientific journal Soft Robotics revealed that they can then be properly rescued. It will save time digging in areas where there is clearly no one left alive, and allow rescuers to concentrate their efforts on survivors. The cyborg beetles were developed by scientists from Nanyang Technological University (NTU) and they released a video showing them steering one beetle right and left, and backward and forward, with the click of a button. For the test they used a series of darkling beetles which are just 0.8 inches long and weigh only 0.5 grammes, attaching a tiny computer that weighs less than the beetle to their backs using beeswax. Through the computer they can not only detect carbon monoxide but also send electrical pulses to the insect's antennae using silver wire electrodes which allow them to steer it. They say that the project will get even more efficient shortly when they replace the batteries currently used with a biofuel cell, which can generate power using glucose in the insect. As well as carbon dioxide, the team hope that the sensors will also be able to detect temperature and the vibration from heartbeats. Assistant Professor Hirotaka Sato, from NTU's School of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, said: "In the aftermath of a disaster, many survivors remain buried and the rescue teams are often not clear which
NAJWYŻSZA DOSTĘPNA ROZDZIELCZOŚĆ
EN_01292903_0002 AWR
Pic shows: The cyborg beetle; Boffins claim to have created the world's smallest disaster squad in the form of cyborg beetles. They believe that the remote-controlled insects which will be fitted with tiny backpacks capable of detecting carbon dioxide will be able to go into the rubble of collapsed buildings following earthquakes or other disasters. Once inside, the carbon monoxide detectors will tell the controllers of the insects if there is a living person breathing, and, if so, in what direction, allowing them to steer the beetle towards whoever is generating the carbon dioxide. And once the victims are discovered, a review in the scientific journal Soft Robotics revealed that they can then be properly rescued. It will save time digging in areas where there is clearly no one left alive, and allow rescuers to concentrate their efforts on survivors. The cyborg beetles were developed by scientists from Nanyang Technological University (NTU) and they released a video showing them steering one beetle right and left, and backward and forward, with the click of a button. For the test they used a series of darkling beetles which are just 0.8 inches long and weigh only 0.5 grammes, attaching a tiny computer that weighs less than the beetle to their backs using beeswax. Through the computer they can not only detect carbon monoxide but also send electrical pulses to the insect's antennae using silver wire electrodes which allow them to steer it. They say that the project will get even more efficient shortly when they replace the batteries currently used with a biofuel cell, which can generate power using glucose in the insect. As well as carbon dioxide, the team hope that the sensors will also be able to detect temperature and the vibration from heartbeats. Assistant Professor Hirotaka Sato, from NTU's School of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, said: "In the aftermath of a disaster, many survivors remain buried and the rescue teams are often not clear which
NAJWYŻSZA DOSTĘPNA ROZDZIELCZOŚĆ
EN_01292903_0003 AWR
Pic shows: The cyborg beetle; Boffins claim to have created the world's smallest disaster squad in the form of cyborg beetles. They believe that the remote-controlled insects which will be fitted with tiny backpacks capable of detecting carbon dioxide will be able to go into the rubble of collapsed buildings following earthquakes or other disasters. Once inside, the carbon monoxide detectors will tell the controllers of the insects if there is a living person breathing, and, if so, in what direction, allowing them to steer the beetle towards whoever is generating the carbon dioxide. And once the victims are discovered, a review in the scientific journal Soft Robotics revealed that they can then be properly rescued. It will save time digging in areas where there is clearly no one left alive, and allow rescuers to concentrate their efforts on survivors. The cyborg beetles were developed by scientists from Nanyang Technological University (NTU) and they released a video showing them steering one beetle right and left, and backward and forward, with the click of a button. For the test they used a series of darkling beetles which are just 0.8 inches long and weigh only 0.5 grammes, attaching a tiny computer that weighs less than the beetle to their backs using beeswax. Through the computer they can not only detect carbon monoxide but also send electrical pulses to the insect's antennae using silver wire electrodes which allow them to steer it. They say that the project will get even more efficient shortly when they replace the batteries currently used with a biofuel cell, which can generate power using glucose in the insect. As well as carbon dioxide, the team hope that the sensors will also be able to detect temperature and the vibration from heartbeats. Assistant Professor Hirotaka Sato, from NTU's School of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, said: "In the aftermath of a disaster, many survivors remain buried and the rescue teams are often not clear which
NAJWYŻSZA DOSTĘPNA ROZDZIELCZOŚĆ
EN_01292903_0004 AWR
Pic shows: The cyborg beetle; Boffins claim to have created the world's smallest disaster squad in the form of cyborg beetles. They believe that the remote-controlled insects which will be fitted with tiny backpacks capable of detecting carbon dioxide will be able to go into the rubble of collapsed buildings following earthquakes or other disasters. Once inside, the carbon monoxide detectors will tell the controllers of the insects if there is a living person breathing, and, if so, in what direction, allowing them to steer the beetle towards whoever is generating the carbon dioxide. And once the victims are discovered, a review in the scientific journal Soft Robotics revealed that they can then be properly rescued. It will save time digging in areas where there is clearly no one left alive, and allow rescuers to concentrate their efforts on survivors. The cyborg beetles were developed by scientists from Nanyang Technological University (NTU) and they released a video showing them steering one beetle right and left, and backward and forward, with the click of a button. For the test they used a series of darkling beetles which are just 0.8 inches long and weigh only 0.5 grammes, attaching a tiny computer that weighs less than the beetle to their backs using beeswax. Through the computer they can not only detect carbon monoxide but also send electrical pulses to the insect's antennae using silver wire electrodes which allow them to steer it. They say that the project will get even more efficient shortly when they replace the batteries currently used with a biofuel cell, which can generate power using glucose in the insect. As well as carbon dioxide, the team hope that the sensors will also be able to detect temperature and the vibration from heartbeats. Assistant Professor Hirotaka Sato, from NTU's School of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, said: "In the aftermath of a disaster, many survivors remain buried and the rescue teams are often not clear which
NAJWYŻSZA DOSTĘPNA ROZDZIELCZOŚĆ