sobota, 20 października 2018
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Każdy mieszkaniec ma własne ujęcie wody (6)

EN_01292689_0001 AWR
Pics shows: Residents in an ancient city in North-west China lock the water taps to prevent others from taking their water; A bizarre row of taps locked with padlocks adorns a wall in a Chinese city as the residents safeguard their personal supply from water thieves. The odd arrangement in Xi???an city, capital city of China???s north-west Shaanxi Province, is due to the city???s archaic infrastructure in places. Each family living in one particular street has covered their tap with an old tin can and secured it with a padlock. It is the only way the residents can ensure that their private supply, which they pay for individually, will not be stolen. The water wall there began to develop 60 years ago, at which time residents had to line up with buckets to get their supplies from a single tap. Later, families were afforded the relative luxury of having one tap each. Then they realised that theft was a problem and the padlock system developed. Local media report that although the city is developing fast, this particular area is so old that it is not worth installing a whole new system of pipes. It was not clear whether city authorities were planning on demolishing and rebuilding the area but for now it seems locals will have to keep trudging out to the street with their padlock keys and buckets to get their daily water supplies.
NAJWYŻSZA DOSTĘPNA ROZDZIELCZOŚĆ
EN_01292689_0002 AWR
Pics shows: Residents in an ancient city in North-west China lock the water taps to prevent others from taking their water; A bizarre row of taps locked with padlocks adorns a wall in a Chinese city as the residents safeguard their personal supply from water thieves. The odd arrangement in Xi???an city, capital city of China???s north-west Shaanxi Province, is due to the city???s archaic infrastructure in places. Each family living in one particular street has covered their tap with an old tin can and secured it with a padlock. It is the only way the residents can ensure that their private supply, which they pay for individually, will not be stolen. The water wall there began to develop 60 years ago, at which time residents had to line up with buckets to get their supplies from a single tap. Later, families were afforded the relative luxury of having one tap each. Then they realised that theft was a problem and the padlock system developed. Local media report that although the city is developing fast, this particular area is so old that it is not worth installing a whole new system of pipes. It was not clear whether city authorities were planning on demolishing and rebuilding the area but for now it seems locals will have to keep trudging out to the street with their padlock keys and buckets to get their daily water supplies.
NAJWYŻSZA DOSTĘPNA ROZDZIELCZOŚĆ
EN_01292689_0003 AWR
Pics shows: Residents in an ancient city in North-west China lock the water taps to prevent others from taking their water; A bizarre row of taps locked with padlocks adorns a wall in a Chinese city as the residents safeguard their personal supply from water thieves. The odd arrangement in Xi???an city, capital city of China???s north-west Shaanxi Province, is due to the city???s archaic infrastructure in places. Each family living in one particular street has covered their tap with an old tin can and secured it with a padlock. It is the only way the residents can ensure that their private supply, which they pay for individually, will not be stolen. The water wall there began to develop 60 years ago, at which time residents had to line up with buckets to get their supplies from a single tap. Later, families were afforded the relative luxury of having one tap each. Then they realised that theft was a problem and the padlock system developed. Local media report that although the city is developing fast, this particular area is so old that it is not worth installing a whole new system of pipes. It was not clear whether city authorities were planning on demolishing and rebuilding the area but for now it seems locals will have to keep trudging out to the street with their padlock keys and buckets to get their daily water supplies.
NAJWYŻSZA DOSTĘPNA ROZDZIELCZOŚĆ
EN_01292689_0004 AWR
Pics shows: Residents in an ancient city in North-west China lock the water taps to prevent others from taking their water; A bizarre row of taps locked with padlocks adorns a wall in a Chinese city as the residents safeguard their personal supply from water thieves. The odd arrangement in Xi???an city, capital city of China???s north-west Shaanxi Province, is due to the city???s archaic infrastructure in places. Each family living in one particular street has covered their tap with an old tin can and secured it with a padlock. It is the only way the residents can ensure that their private supply, which they pay for individually, will not be stolen. The water wall there began to develop 60 years ago, at which time residents had to line up with buckets to get their supplies from a single tap. Later, families were afforded the relative luxury of having one tap each. Then they realised that theft was a problem and the padlock system developed. Local media report that although the city is developing fast, this particular area is so old that it is not worth installing a whole new system of pipes. It was not clear whether city authorities were planning on demolishing and rebuilding the area but for now it seems locals will have to keep trudging out to the street with their padlock keys and buckets to get their daily water supplies.
NAJWYŻSZA DOSTĘPNA ROZDZIELCZOŚĆ
EN_01292689_0005 AWR
Pics shows: Residents in an ancient city in North-west China lock the water taps to prevent others from taking their water; A bizarre row of taps locked with padlocks adorns a wall in a Chinese city as the residents safeguard their personal supply from water thieves. The odd arrangement in Xi???an city, capital city of China???s north-west Shaanxi Province, is due to the city???s archaic infrastructure in places. Each family living in one particular street has covered their tap with an old tin can and secured it with a padlock. It is the only way the residents can ensure that their private supply, which they pay for individually, will not be stolen. The water wall there began to develop 60 years ago, at which time residents had to line up with buckets to get their supplies from a single tap. Later, families were afforded the relative luxury of having one tap each. Then they realised that theft was a problem and the padlock system developed. Local media report that although the city is developing fast, this particular area is so old that it is not worth installing a whole new system of pipes. It was not clear whether city authorities were planning on demolishing and rebuilding the area but for now it seems locals will have to keep trudging out to the street with their padlock keys and buckets to get their daily water supplies.
NAJWYŻSZA DOSTĘPNA ROZDZIELCZOŚĆ
EN_01292689_0006 AWR
Pics shows: Residents in an ancient city in North-west China lock the water taps to prevent others from taking their water; A bizarre row of taps locked with padlocks adorns a wall in a Chinese city as the residents safeguard their personal supply from water thieves. The odd arrangement in Xi???an city, capital city of China???s north-west Shaanxi Province, is due to the city???s archaic infrastructure in places. Each family living in one particular street has covered their tap with an old tin can and secured it with a padlock. It is the only way the residents can ensure that their private supply, which they pay for individually, will not be stolen. The water wall there began to develop 60 years ago, at which time residents had to line up with buckets to get their supplies from a single tap. Later, families were afforded the relative luxury of having one tap each. Then they realised that theft was a problem and the padlock system developed. Local media report that although the city is developing fast, this particular area is so old that it is not worth installing a whole new system of pipes. It was not clear whether city authorities were planning on demolishing and rebuilding the area but for now it seems locals will have to keep trudging out to the street with their padlock keys and buckets to get their daily water supplies.
NAJWYŻSZA DOSTĘPNA ROZDZIELCZOŚĆ