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Organizacja World Animal Protection walczy z selfie z dzikimi zwierzętami (11)

EN_01282177_0001 FER
Ferrari Press Agency Ref 8489 Selfies1 05/10/2017 See Ferrari text Picture must credit : World Animal Protection An animal charity says tourists wanting selfies with some of the world???s most endangered species is causing suffering.It says babies are being snatched from their mothers to fuel the demand for cute animal photosAccording to international welfare organisation World Animal Protection. The social media phenomenon is driving the suffering and exploitation of some of the world's most iconic animals in the Amazon jungle. Investigators from the group probed two Amazon gateway cities , Manaus in Brazil and Puerto Alegria, Peru.They said they found evidence animals such as sloths, monkeys , snakes and crocodiles are snatched from the wild, often illegally.It claims they are then used by irresponsible tour operators who cruelly exploit and injure wildlife to entertain and provide harmful photo opportunities for tourists. A spokesman said:??? In public view and behind the scenes, investigators uncovered evidence of cruelty being inflicted on wild animals???These included, according to World Animal Protection:??? Sloths captured from the wild, tied to trees with rope, not surviving longer than six months ;??? Birds such as toucans with severe abscesses on their feet ;??? Green anaconda snakes wounded and dehydrated ??? Caiman crocodiles restrained with rubber bands around their jaws ;??? An ocelot wild cat kept in a small barren cage ;??? A manatee held in a tiny tank in the forecourt of a local hotel and ??? A giant anteater, manhandled and beaten by its owner The welfare organisation???s CEP Steve McIvor said: "The wildlife selfie craze is a worldwide phenomenon fueled by tourists, many of whom are unaware of the abhorrent conditions and terrible treatment wild animals may endure to provide that special souvenir photo."Behind the scenes, wild animals are being taken from their mothers as babies and secretly kept in filthy, cramped conditions or rep
EN_01282177_0002 FER
Ferrari Press Agency Ref 8489 Selfies1 05/10/2017 See Ferrari text Picture must credit : World Animal Protection An animal charity says tourists wanting selfies with some of the world???s most endangered species is causing suffering.It says babies are being snatched from their mothers to fuel the demand for cute animal photosAccording to international welfare organisation World Animal Protection. The social media phenomenon is driving the suffering and exploitation of some of the world's most iconic animals in the Amazon jungle. Investigators from the group probed two Amazon gateway cities , Manaus in Brazil and Puerto Alegria, Peru.They said they found evidence animals such as sloths, monkeys , snakes and crocodiles are snatched from the wild, often illegally.It claims they are then used by irresponsible tour operators who cruelly exploit and injure wildlife to entertain and provide harmful photo opportunities for tourists. A spokesman said:??? In public view and behind the scenes, investigators uncovered evidence of cruelty being inflicted on wild animals???These included, according to World Animal Protection:??? Sloths captured from the wild, tied to trees with rope, not surviving longer than six months ;??? Birds such as toucans with severe abscesses on their feet ;??? Green anaconda snakes wounded and dehydrated ??? Caiman crocodiles restrained with rubber bands around their jaws ;??? An ocelot wild cat kept in a small barren cage ;??? A manatee held in a tiny tank in the forecourt of a local hotel and ??? A giant anteater, manhandled and beaten by its owner The welfare organisation???s CEP Steve McIvor said: "The wildlife selfie craze is a worldwide phenomenon fueled by tourists, many of whom are unaware of the abhorrent conditions and terrible treatment wild animals may endure to provide that special souvenir photo."Behind the scenes, wild animals are being taken from their mothers as babies and secretly kept in filthy, cramped conditions or rep
EN_01282177_0003 FER
Ferrari Press Agency Ref 8489 Selfies1 05/10/2017 See Ferrari text Picture must credit : World Animal Protection An animal charity says tourists wanting selfies with some of the world???s most endangered species is causing suffering.It says babies are being snatched from their mothers to fuel the demand for cute animal photosAccording to international welfare organisation World Animal Protection. The social media phenomenon is driving the suffering and exploitation of some of the world's most iconic animals in the Amazon jungle. Investigators from the group probed two Amazon gateway cities , Manaus in Brazil and Puerto Alegria, Peru.They said they found evidence animals such as sloths, monkeys , snakes and crocodiles are snatched from the wild, often illegally.It claims they are then used by irresponsible tour operators who cruelly exploit and injure wildlife to entertain and provide harmful photo opportunities for tourists. A spokesman said:??? In public view and behind the scenes, investigators uncovered evidence of cruelty being inflicted on wild animals???These included, according to World Animal Protection:??? Sloths captured from the wild, tied to trees with rope, not surviving longer than six months ;??? Birds such as toucans with severe abscesses on their feet ;??? Green anaconda snakes wounded and dehydrated ??? Caiman crocodiles restrained with rubber bands around their jaws ;??? An ocelot wild cat kept in a small barren cage ;??? A manatee held in a tiny tank in the forecourt of a local hotel and ??? A giant anteater, manhandled and beaten by its owner The welfare organisation???s CEP Steve McIvor said: "The wildlife selfie craze is a worldwide phenomenon fueled by tourists, many of whom are unaware of the abhorrent conditions and terrible treatment wild animals may endure to provide that special souvenir photo."Behind the scenes, wild animals are being taken from their mothers as babies and secretly kept in filthy, cramped conditions or rep
EN_01282177_0004 FER
Ferrari Press Agency Ref 8489 Selfies1 05/10/2017 See Ferrari text Picture must credit : World Animal Protection An animal charity says tourists wanting selfies with some of the world???s most endangered species is causing suffering.It says babies are being snatched from their mothers to fuel the demand for cute animal photosAccording to international welfare organisation World Animal Protection. The social media phenomenon is driving the suffering and exploitation of some of the world's most iconic animals in the Amazon jungle. Investigators from the group probed two Amazon gateway cities , Manaus in Brazil and Puerto Alegria, Peru.They said they found evidence animals such as sloths, monkeys , snakes and crocodiles are snatched from the wild, often illegally.It claims they are then used by irresponsible tour operators who cruelly exploit and injure wildlife to entertain and provide harmful photo opportunities for tourists. A spokesman said:??? In public view and behind the scenes, investigators uncovered evidence of cruelty being inflicted on wild animals???These included, according to World Animal Protection:??? Sloths captured from the wild, tied to trees with rope, not surviving longer than six months ;??? Birds such as toucans with severe abscesses on their feet ;??? Green anaconda snakes wounded and dehydrated ??? Caiman crocodiles restrained with rubber bands around their jaws ;??? An ocelot wild cat kept in a small barren cage ;??? A manatee held in a tiny tank in the forecourt of a local hotel and ??? A giant anteater, manhandled and beaten by its owner The welfare organisation???s CEP Steve McIvor said: "The wildlife selfie craze is a worldwide phenomenon fueled by tourists, many of whom are unaware of the abhorrent conditions and terrible treatment wild animals may endure to provide that special souvenir photo."Behind the scenes, wild animals are being taken from their mothers as babies and secretly kept in filthy, cramped conditions or rep
EN_01282177_0005 FER
Ferrari Press Agency Ref 8489 Selfies1 05/10/2017 See Ferrari text Picture must credit : World Animal Protection An animal charity says tourists wanting selfies with some of the world???s most endangered species is causing suffering.It says babies are being snatched from their mothers to fuel the demand for cute animal photosAccording to international welfare organisation World Animal Protection. The social media phenomenon is driving the suffering and exploitation of some of the world's most iconic animals in the Amazon jungle. Investigators from the group probed two Amazon gateway cities , Manaus in Brazil and Puerto Alegria, Peru.They said they found evidence animals such as sloths, monkeys , snakes and crocodiles are snatched from the wild, often illegally.It claims they are then used by irresponsible tour operators who cruelly exploit and injure wildlife to entertain and provide harmful photo opportunities for tourists. A spokesman said:??? In public view and behind the scenes, investigators uncovered evidence of cruelty being inflicted on wild animals???These included, according to World Animal Protection:??? Sloths captured from the wild, tied to trees with rope, not surviving longer than six months ;??? Birds such as toucans with severe abscesses on their feet ;??? Green anaconda snakes wounded and dehydrated ??? Caiman crocodiles restrained with rubber bands around their jaws ;??? An ocelot wild cat kept in a small barren cage ;??? A manatee held in a tiny tank in the forecourt of a local hotel and ??? A giant anteater, manhandled and beaten by its owner The welfare organisation???s CEP Steve McIvor said: "The wildlife selfie craze is a worldwide phenomenon fueled by tourists, many of whom are unaware of the abhorrent conditions and terrible treatment wild animals may endure to provide that special souvenir photo."Behind the scenes, wild animals are being taken from their mothers as babies and secretly kept in filthy, cramped conditions or rep
EN_01282177_0006 FER
Ferrari Press Agency Ref 8489 Selfies1 05/10/2017 See Ferrari text Picture must credit : World Animal Protection An animal charity says tourists wanting selfies with some of the world???s most endangered species is causing suffering.It says babies are being snatched from their mothers to fuel the demand for cute animal photosAccording to international welfare organisation World Animal Protection. The social media phenomenon is driving the suffering and exploitation of some of the world's most iconic animals in the Amazon jungle. Investigators from the group probed two Amazon gateway cities , Manaus in Brazil and Puerto Alegria, Peru.They said they found evidence animals such as sloths, monkeys , snakes and crocodiles are snatched from the wild, often illegally.It claims they are then used by irresponsible tour operators who cruelly exploit and injure wildlife to entertain and provide harmful photo opportunities for tourists. A spokesman said:??? In public view and behind the scenes, investigators uncovered evidence of cruelty being inflicted on wild animals???These included, according to World Animal Protection:??? Sloths captured from the wild, tied to trees with rope, not surviving longer than six months ;??? Birds such as toucans with severe abscesses on their feet ;??? Green anaconda snakes wounded and dehydrated ??? Caiman crocodiles restrained with rubber bands around their jaws ;??? An ocelot wild cat kept in a small barren cage ;??? A manatee held in a tiny tank in the forecourt of a local hotel and ??? A giant anteater, manhandled and beaten by its owner The welfare organisation???s CEP Steve McIvor said: "The wildlife selfie craze is a worldwide phenomenon fueled by tourists, many of whom are unaware of the abhorrent conditions and terrible treatment wild animals may endure to provide that special souvenir photo."Behind the scenes, wild animals are being taken from their mothers as babies and secretly kept in filthy, cramped conditions or rep
EN_01282177_0007 FER
Ferrari Press Agency Ref 8489 Selfies1 05/10/2017 See Ferrari text Picture must credit : World Animal Protection An animal charity says tourists wanting selfies with some of the world???s most endangered species is causing suffering.It says babies are being snatched from their mothers to fuel the demand for cute animal photosAccording to international welfare organisation World Animal Protection. The social media phenomenon is driving the suffering and exploitation of some of the world's most iconic animals in the Amazon jungle. Investigators from the group probed two Amazon gateway cities , Manaus in Brazil and Puerto Alegria, Peru.They said they found evidence animals such as sloths, monkeys , snakes and crocodiles are snatched from the wild, often illegally.It claims they are then used by irresponsible tour operators who cruelly exploit and injure wildlife to entertain and provide harmful photo opportunities for tourists. A spokesman said:??? In public view and behind the scenes, investigators uncovered evidence of cruelty being inflicted on wild animals???These included, according to World Animal Protection:??? Sloths captured from the wild, tied to trees with rope, not surviving longer than six months ;??? Birds such as toucans with severe abscesses on their feet ;??? Green anaconda snakes wounded and dehydrated ??? Caiman crocodiles restrained with rubber bands around their jaws ;??? An ocelot wild cat kept in a small barren cage ;??? A manatee held in a tiny tank in the forecourt of a local hotel and ??? A giant anteater, manhandled and beaten by its owner The welfare organisation???s CEP Steve McIvor said: "The wildlife selfie craze is a worldwide phenomenon fueled by tourists, many of whom are unaware of the abhorrent conditions and terrible treatment wild animals may endure to provide that special souvenir photo."Behind the scenes, wild animals are being taken from their mothers as babies and secretly kept in filthy, cramped conditions or rep
EN_01282177_0008 FER
Ferrari Press Agency Ref 8489 Selfies1 05/10/2017 See Ferrari text Picture must credit : World Animal Protection An animal charity says tourists wanting selfies with some of the world???s most endangered species is causing suffering.It says babies are being snatched from their mothers to fuel the demand for cute animal photosAccording to international welfare organisation World Animal Protection. The social media phenomenon is driving the suffering and exploitation of some of the world's most iconic animals in the Amazon jungle. Investigators from the group probed two Amazon gateway cities , Manaus in Brazil and Puerto Alegria, Peru.They said they found evidence animals such as sloths, monkeys , snakes and crocodiles are snatched from the wild, often illegally.It claims they are then used by irresponsible tour operators who cruelly exploit and injure wildlife to entertain and provide harmful photo opportunities for tourists. A spokesman said:??? In public view and behind the scenes, investigators uncovered evidence of cruelty being inflicted on wild animals???These included, according to World Animal Protection:??? Sloths captured from the wild, tied to trees with rope, not surviving longer than six months ;??? Birds such as toucans with severe abscesses on their feet ;??? Green anaconda snakes wounded and dehydrated ??? Caiman crocodiles restrained with rubber bands around their jaws ;??? An ocelot wild cat kept in a small barren cage ;??? A manatee held in a tiny tank in the forecourt of a local hotel and ??? A giant anteater, manhandled and beaten by its owner The welfare organisation???s CEP Steve McIvor said: "The wildlife selfie craze is a worldwide phenomenon fueled by tourists, many of whom are unaware of the abhorrent conditions and terrible treatment wild animals may endure to provide that special souvenir photo."Behind the scenes, wild animals are being taken from their mothers as babies and secretly kept in filthy, cramped conditions or rep
EN_01282177_0009 FER
Ferrari Press Agency Ref 8489 Selfies1 05/10/2017 See Ferrari text Picture must credit : World Animal Protection An animal charity says tourists wanting selfies with some of the world???s most endangered species is causing suffering.It says babies are being snatched from their mothers to fuel the demand for cute animal photosAccording to international welfare organisation World Animal Protection. The social media phenomenon is driving the suffering and exploitation of some of the world's most iconic animals in the Amazon jungle. Investigators from the group probed two Amazon gateway cities , Manaus in Brazil and Puerto Alegria, Peru.They said they found evidence animals such as sloths, monkeys , snakes and crocodiles are snatched from the wild, often illegally.It claims they are then used by irresponsible tour operators who cruelly exploit and injure wildlife to entertain and provide harmful photo opportunities for tourists. A spokesman said:??? In public view and behind the scenes, investigators uncovered evidence of cruelty being inflicted on wild animals???These included, according to World Animal Protection:??? Sloths captured from the wild, tied to trees with rope, not surviving longer than six months ;??? Birds such as toucans with severe abscesses on their feet ;??? Green anaconda snakes wounded and dehydrated ??? Caiman crocodiles restrained with rubber bands around their jaws ;??? An ocelot wild cat kept in a small barren cage ;??? A manatee held in a tiny tank in the forecourt of a local hotel and ??? A giant anteater, manhandled and beaten by its owner The welfare organisation???s CEP Steve McIvor said: "The wildlife selfie craze is a worldwide phenomenon fueled by tourists, many of whom are unaware of the abhorrent conditions and terrible treatment wild animals may endure to provide that special souvenir photo."Behind the scenes, wild animals are being taken from their mothers as babies and secretly kept in filthy, cramped conditions or rep
EN_01282177_0010 FER
Ferrari Press Agency Ref 8489 Selfies1 05/10/2017 See Ferrari text Picture must credit : World Animal Protection An animal charity says tourists wanting selfies with some of the world???s most endangered species is causing suffering.It says babies are being snatched from their mothers to fuel the demand for cute animal photosAccording to international welfare organisation World Animal Protection. The social media phenomenon is driving the suffering and exploitation of some of the world's most iconic animals in the Amazon jungle. Investigators from the group probed two Amazon gateway cities , Manaus in Brazil and Puerto Alegria, Peru.They said they found evidence animals such as sloths, monkeys , snakes and crocodiles are snatched from the wild, often illegally.It claims they are then used by irresponsible tour operators who cruelly exploit and injure wildlife to entertain and provide harmful photo opportunities for tourists. A spokesman said:??? In public view and behind the scenes, investigators uncovered evidence of cruelty being inflicted on wild animals???These included, according to World Animal Protection:??? Sloths captured from the wild, tied to trees with rope, not surviving longer than six months ;??? Birds such as toucans with severe abscesses on their feet ;??? Green anaconda snakes wounded and dehydrated ??? Caiman crocodiles restrained with rubber bands around their jaws ;??? An ocelot wild cat kept in a small barren cage ;??? A manatee held in a tiny tank in the forecourt of a local hotel and ??? A giant anteater, manhandled and beaten by its owner The welfare organisation???s CEP Steve McIvor said: "The wildlife selfie craze is a worldwide phenomenon fueled by tourists, many of whom are unaware of the abhorrent conditions and terrible treatment wild animals may endure to provide that special souvenir photo."Behind the scenes, wild animals are being taken from their mothers as babies and secretly kept in filthy, cramped conditions or rep
EN_01282177_0011 FER
Ferrari Press Agency Ref 8489 Selfies1 05/10/2017 See Ferrari text Picture must credit : World Animal Protection An animal charity says tourists wanting selfies with some of the world???s most endangered species is causing suffering.It says babies are being snatched from their mothers to fuel the demand for cute animal photosAccording to international welfare organisation World Animal Protection. The social media phenomenon is driving the suffering and exploitation of some of the world's most iconic animals in the Amazon jungle. Investigators from the group probed two Amazon gateway cities , Manaus in Brazil and Puerto Alegria, Peru.They said they found evidence animals such as sloths, monkeys , snakes and crocodiles are snatched from the wild, often illegally.It claims they are then used by irresponsible tour operators who cruelly exploit and injure wildlife to entertain and provide harmful photo opportunities for tourists. A spokesman said:??? In public view and behind the scenes, investigators uncovered evidence of cruelty being inflicted on wild animals???These included, according to World Animal Protection:??? Sloths captured from the wild, tied to trees with rope, not surviving longer than six months ;??? Birds such as toucans with severe abscesses on their feet ;??? Green anaconda snakes wounded and dehydrated ??? Caiman crocodiles restrained with rubber bands around their jaws ;??? An ocelot wild cat kept in a small barren cage ;??? A manatee held in a tiny tank in the forecourt of a local hotel and ??? A giant anteater, manhandled and beaten by its owner The welfare organisation???s CEP Steve McIvor said: "The wildlife selfie craze is a worldwide phenomenon fueled by tourists, many of whom are unaware of the abhorrent conditions and terrible treatment wild animals may endure to provide that special souvenir photo."Behind the scenes, wild animals are being taken from their mothers as babies and secretly kept in filthy, cramped conditions or rep