piątek, 20 października 2017
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Parkour w ruinach Strefy Gazy (9)

EN_01282174_0001 COV
**SUPPORTING VIDEO AVAILABLE. CONTACT COVER IMAGES TO RECEIVE.** For two Palestinian refugees, parkour began as a way of escape, now it???s a way of life. It is 10 years since Mohammed Aljakhabir and Ahmad Matar were inspired by a YouTube video to jump off the ruined buildings of the Khan Yunis refugee camp in Gaza. Together, they filmed their own stunning parkour videos to an increasingly growing audience, back flips with bombs exploding in the background on occasion, the damaged city walls and buildings, and the often sandy terrain the ideal if unlikely backdrop for their passion. Aljakhabir describes parkour as ??smy lifestyle???. He said: ??sIt makes me overcome all my life obstacles. When I face a problem, this is the wall. I want to jump over this wall. This is the problem, and parkour gives me the hope.??? The pair???s parkour has taken them further afield, the duo having left Gaza for Sweden in 2012 where they now both life and continue their sporting passion. Aljakhabir has a two-year-old daughter, Dania, who he is already teaching the finer points of parkour. Of his move from a Gaza refugee camp to Sweden five years ago, he recalls a reaction of, ??swow, wow, I???m free,??? thinking at the time, ??sI wish this is not a dream, I wish this is real???. When they first started practising parkour in the refugee camp, Matar recalls how it was met with scepticism from their fellow residents. ??sWhen we started in the streets and public places, people didn???t like it,??? he recalls. ??sWe were climbing and jumping in the streets so thought we were trying to steal something.??? So, instead, they turned a nearby cemetery into their makeshift playground. For Matar, it has changed his life. While the move to Sweden has taken him away from his family and friends, he is grateful for the new lease of life. ??sWhen I started parkour my family changed my mind about me,??? he says of how parkour has changed his life. ??sThey became proud because parkour is dan
EDITORIAL USE ONLY. IMAGES ONLY TO BE USED IN CONJUNCTION WITH EDITORIAL STORY.
EN_01282174_0002 COV
**SUPPORTING VIDEO AVAILABLE. CONTACT COVER IMAGES TO RECEIVE.** For two Palestinian refugees, parkour began as a way of escape, now it???s a way of life. It is 10 years since Mohammed Aljakhabir and Ahmad Matar were inspired by a YouTube video to jump off the ruined buildings of the Khan Yunis refugee camp in Gaza. Together, they filmed their own stunning parkour videos to an increasingly growing audience, back flips with bombs exploding in the background on occasion, the damaged city walls and buildings, and the often sandy terrain the ideal if unlikely backdrop for their passion. Aljakhabir describes parkour as ??smy lifestyle???. He said: ??sIt makes me overcome all my life obstacles. When I face a problem, this is the wall. I want to jump over this wall. This is the problem, and parkour gives me the hope.??? The pair???s parkour has taken them further afield, the duo having left Gaza for Sweden in 2012 where they now both life and continue their sporting passion. Aljakhabir has a two-year-old daughter, Dania, who he is already teaching the finer points of parkour. Of his move from a Gaza refugee camp to Sweden five years ago, he recalls a reaction of, ??swow, wow, I???m free,??? thinking at the time, ??sI wish this is not a dream, I wish this is real???. When they first started practising parkour in the refugee camp, Matar recalls how it was met with scepticism from their fellow residents. ??sWhen we started in the streets and public places, people didn???t like it,??? he recalls. ??sWe were climbing and jumping in the streets so thought we were trying to steal something.??? So, instead, they turned a nearby cemetery into their makeshift playground. For Matar, it has changed his life. While the move to Sweden has taken him away from his family and friends, he is grateful for the new lease of life. ??sWhen I started parkour my family changed my mind about me,??? he says of how parkour has changed his life. ??sThey became proud because parkour is dan
EDITORIAL USE ONLY. IMAGES ONLY TO BE USED IN CONJUNCTION WITH EDITORIAL STORY.
EN_01282174_0003 COV
**SUPPORTING VIDEO AVAILABLE. CONTACT COVER IMAGES TO RECEIVE.** For two Palestinian refugees, parkour began as a way of escape, now it???s a way of life. It is 10 years since Mohammed Aljakhabir and Ahmad Matar were inspired by a YouTube video to jump off the ruined buildings of the Khan Yunis refugee camp in Gaza. Together, they filmed their own stunning parkour videos to an increasingly growing audience, back flips with bombs exploding in the background on occasion, the damaged city walls and buildings, and the often sandy terrain the ideal if unlikely backdrop for their passion. Aljakhabir describes parkour as ??smy lifestyle???. He said: ??sIt makes me overcome all my life obstacles. When I face a problem, this is the wall. I want to jump over this wall. This is the problem, and parkour gives me the hope.??? The pair???s parkour has taken them further afield, the duo having left Gaza for Sweden in 2012 where they now both life and continue their sporting passion. Aljakhabir has a two-year-old daughter, Dania, who he is already teaching the finer points of parkour. Of his move from a Gaza refugee camp to Sweden five years ago, he recalls a reaction of, ??swow, wow, I???m free,??? thinking at the time, ??sI wish this is not a dream, I wish this is real???. When they first started practising parkour in the refugee camp, Matar recalls how it was met with scepticism from their fellow residents. ??sWhen we started in the streets and public places, people didn???t like it,??? he recalls. ??sWe were climbing and jumping in the streets so thought we were trying to steal something.??? So, instead, they turned a nearby cemetery into their makeshift playground. For Matar, it has changed his life. While the move to Sweden has taken him away from his family and friends, he is grateful for the new lease of life. ??sWhen I started parkour my family changed my mind about me,??? he says of how parkour has changed his life. ??sThey became proud because parkour is dan
EDITORIAL USE ONLY. IMAGES ONLY TO BE USED IN CONJUNCTION WITH EDITORIAL STORY.
EN_01282174_0004 COV
**SUPPORTING VIDEO AVAILABLE. CONTACT COVER IMAGES TO RECEIVE.** For two Palestinian refugees, parkour began as a way of escape, now it???s a way of life. It is 10 years since Mohammed Aljakhabir and Ahmad Matar were inspired by a YouTube video to jump off the ruined buildings of the Khan Yunis refugee camp in Gaza. Together, they filmed their own stunning parkour videos to an increasingly growing audience, back flips with bombs exploding in the background on occasion, the damaged city walls and buildings, and the often sandy terrain the ideal if unlikely backdrop for their passion. Aljakhabir describes parkour as ??smy lifestyle???. He said: ??sIt makes me overcome all my life obstacles. When I face a problem, this is the wall. I want to jump over this wall. This is the problem, and parkour gives me the hope.??? The pair???s parkour has taken them further afield, the duo having left Gaza for Sweden in 2012 where they now both life and continue their sporting passion. Aljakhabir has a two-year-old daughter, Dania, who he is already teaching the finer points of parkour. Of his move from a Gaza refugee camp to Sweden five years ago, he recalls a reaction of, ??swow, wow, I???m free,??? thinking at the time, ??sI wish this is not a dream, I wish this is real???. When they first started practising parkour in the refugee camp, Matar recalls how it was met with scepticism from their fellow residents. ??sWhen we started in the streets and public places, people didn???t like it,??? he recalls. ??sWe were climbing and jumping in the streets so thought we were trying to steal something.??? So, instead, they turned a nearby cemetery into their makeshift playground. For Matar, it has changed his life. While the move to Sweden has taken him away from his family and friends, he is grateful for the new lease of life. ??sWhen I started parkour my family changed my mind about me,??? he says of how parkour has changed his life. ??sThey became proud because parkour is dan
EDITORIAL USE ONLY. IMAGES ONLY TO BE USED IN CONJUNCTION WITH EDITORIAL STORY.
EN_01282174_0005 COV
**SUPPORTING VIDEO AVAILABLE. CONTACT COVER IMAGES TO RECEIVE.** For two Palestinian refugees, parkour began as a way of escape, now it???s a way of life. It is 10 years since Mohammed Aljakhabir and Ahmad Matar were inspired by a YouTube video to jump off the ruined buildings of the Khan Yunis refugee camp in Gaza. Together, they filmed their own stunning parkour videos to an increasingly growing audience, back flips with bombs exploding in the background on occasion, the damaged city walls and buildings, and the often sandy terrain the ideal if unlikely backdrop for their passion. Aljakhabir describes parkour as ??smy lifestyle???. He said: ??sIt makes me overcome all my life obstacles. When I face a problem, this is the wall. I want to jump over this wall. This is the problem, and parkour gives me the hope.??? The pair???s parkour has taken them further afield, the duo having left Gaza for Sweden in 2012 where they now both life and continue their sporting passion. Aljakhabir has a two-year-old daughter, Dania, who he is already teaching the finer points of parkour. Of his move from a Gaza refugee camp to Sweden five years ago, he recalls a reaction of, ??swow, wow, I???m free,??? thinking at the time, ??sI wish this is not a dream, I wish this is real???. When they first started practising parkour in the refugee camp, Matar recalls how it was met with scepticism from their fellow residents. ??sWhen we started in the streets and public places, people didn???t like it,??? he recalls. ??sWe were climbing and jumping in the streets so thought we were trying to steal something.??? So, instead, they turned a nearby cemetery into their makeshift playground. For Matar, it has changed his life. While the move to Sweden has taken him away from his family and friends, he is grateful for the new lease of life. ??sWhen I started parkour my family changed my mind about me,??? he says of how parkour has changed his life. ??sThey became proud because parkour is dan
EDITORIAL USE ONLY. IMAGES ONLY TO BE USED IN CONJUNCTION WITH EDITORIAL STORY.
EN_01282174_0006 COV
**SUPPORTING VIDEO AVAILABLE. CONTACT COVER IMAGES TO RECEIVE.** For two Palestinian refugees, parkour began as a way of escape, now it???s a way of life. It is 10 years since Mohammed Aljakhabir and Ahmad Matar were inspired by a YouTube video to jump off the ruined buildings of the Khan Yunis refugee camp in Gaza. Together, they filmed their own stunning parkour videos to an increasingly growing audience, back flips with bombs exploding in the background on occasion, the damaged city walls and buildings, and the often sandy terrain the ideal if unlikely backdrop for their passion. Aljakhabir describes parkour as ??smy lifestyle???. He said: ??sIt makes me overcome all my life obstacles. When I face a problem, this is the wall. I want to jump over this wall. This is the problem, and parkour gives me the hope.??? The pair???s parkour has taken them further afield, the duo having left Gaza for Sweden in 2012 where they now both life and continue their sporting passion. Aljakhabir has a two-year-old daughter, Dania, who he is already teaching the finer points of parkour. Of his move from a Gaza refugee camp to Sweden five years ago, he recalls a reaction of, ??swow, wow, I???m free,??? thinking at the time, ??sI wish this is not a dream, I wish this is real???. When they first started practising parkour in the refugee camp, Matar recalls how it was met with scepticism from their fellow residents. ??sWhen we started in the streets and public places, people didn???t like it,??? he recalls. ??sWe were climbing and jumping in the streets so thought we were trying to steal something.??? So, instead, they turned a nearby cemetery into their makeshift playground. For Matar, it has changed his life. While the move to Sweden has taken him away from his family and friends, he is grateful for the new lease of life. ??sWhen I started parkour my family changed my mind about me,??? he says of how parkour has changed his life. ??sThey became proud because parkour is dan
EDITORIAL USE ONLY. IMAGES ONLY TO BE USED IN CONJUNCTION WITH EDITORIAL STORY.
EN_01282174_0007 COV
**SUPPORTING VIDEO AVAILABLE. CONTACT COVER IMAGES TO RECEIVE.** For two Palestinian refugees, parkour began as a way of escape, now it???s a way of life. It is 10 years since Mohammed Aljakhabir and Ahmad Matar were inspired by a YouTube video to jump off the ruined buildings of the Khan Yunis refugee camp in Gaza. Together, they filmed their own stunning parkour videos to an increasingly growing audience, back flips with bombs exploding in the background on occasion, the damaged city walls and buildings, and the often sandy terrain the ideal if unlikely backdrop for their passion. Aljakhabir describes parkour as ??smy lifestyle???. He said: ??sIt makes me overcome all my life obstacles. When I face a problem, this is the wall. I want to jump over this wall. This is the problem, and parkour gives me the hope.??? The pair???s parkour has taken them further afield, the duo having left Gaza for Sweden in 2012 where they now both life and continue their sporting passion. Aljakhabir has a two-year-old daughter, Dania, who he is already teaching the finer points of parkour. Of his move from a Gaza refugee camp to Sweden five years ago, he recalls a reaction of, ??swow, wow, I???m free,??? thinking at the time, ??sI wish this is not a dream, I wish this is real???. When they first started practising parkour in the refugee camp, Matar recalls how it was met with scepticism from their fellow residents. ??sWhen we started in the streets and public places, people didn???t like it,??? he recalls. ??sWe were climbing and jumping in the streets so thought we were trying to steal something.??? So, instead, they turned a nearby cemetery into their makeshift playground. For Matar, it has changed his life. While the move to Sweden has taken him away from his family and friends, he is grateful for the new lease of life. ??sWhen I started parkour my family changed my mind about me,??? he says of how parkour has changed his life. ??sThey became proud because parkour is dan
EDITORIAL USE ONLY. IMAGES ONLY TO BE USED IN CONJUNCTION WITH EDITORIAL STORY.
EN_01282174_0008 COV
**SUPPORTING VIDEO AVAILABLE. CONTACT COVER IMAGES TO RECEIVE.** For two Palestinian refugees, parkour began as a way of escape, now it???s a way of life. It is 10 years since Mohammed Aljakhabir and Ahmad Matar were inspired by a YouTube video to jump off the ruined buildings of the Khan Yunis refugee camp in Gaza. Together, they filmed their own stunning parkour videos to an increasingly growing audience, back flips with bombs exploding in the background on occasion, the damaged city walls and buildings, and the often sandy terrain the ideal if unlikely backdrop for their passion. Aljakhabir describes parkour as ??smy lifestyle???. He said: ??sIt makes me overcome all my life obstacles. When I face a problem, this is the wall. I want to jump over this wall. This is the problem, and parkour gives me the hope.??? The pair???s parkour has taken them further afield, the duo having left Gaza for Sweden in 2012 where they now both life and continue their sporting passion. Aljakhabir has a two-year-old daughter, Dania, who he is already teaching the finer points of parkour. Of his move from a Gaza refugee camp to Sweden five years ago, he recalls a reaction of, ??swow, wow, I???m free,??? thinking at the time, ??sI wish this is not a dream, I wish this is real???. When they first started practising parkour in the refugee camp, Matar recalls how it was met with scepticism from their fellow residents. ??sWhen we started in the streets and public places, people didn???t like it,??? he recalls. ??sWe were climbing and jumping in the streets so thought we were trying to steal something.??? So, instead, they turned a nearby cemetery into their makeshift playground. For Matar, it has changed his life. While the move to Sweden has taken him away from his family and friends, he is grateful for the new lease of life. ??sWhen I started parkour my family changed my mind about me,??? he says of how parkour has changed his life. ??sThey became proud because parkour is dan
EDITORIAL USE ONLY. IMAGES ONLY TO BE USED IN CONJUNCTION WITH EDITORIAL STORY.
EN_01282174_0009 COV
**SUPPORTING VIDEO AVAILABLE. CONTACT COVER IMAGES TO RECEIVE.** For two Palestinian refugees, parkour began as a way of escape, now it???s a way of life. It is 10 years since Mohammed Aljakhabir and Ahmad Matar were inspired by a YouTube video to jump off the ruined buildings of the Khan Yunis refugee camp in Gaza. Together, they filmed their own stunning parkour videos to an increasingly growing audience, back flips with bombs exploding in the background on occasion, the damaged city walls and buildings, and the often sandy terrain the ideal if unlikely backdrop for their passion. Aljakhabir describes parkour as ??smy lifestyle???. He said: ??sIt makes me overcome all my life obstacles. When I face a problem, this is the wall. I want to jump over this wall. This is the problem, and parkour gives me the hope.??? The pair???s parkour has taken them further afield, the duo having left Gaza for Sweden in 2012 where they now both life and continue their sporting passion. Aljakhabir has a two-year-old daughter, Dania, who he is already teaching the finer points of parkour. Of his move from a Gaza refugee camp to Sweden five years ago, he recalls a reaction of, ??swow, wow, I???m free,??? thinking at the time, ??sI wish this is not a dream, I wish this is real???. When they first started practising parkour in the refugee camp, Matar recalls how it was met with scepticism from their fellow residents. ??sWhen we started in the streets and public places, people didn???t like it,??? he recalls. ??sWe were climbing and jumping in the streets so thought we were trying to steal something.??? So, instead, they turned a nearby cemetery into their makeshift playground. For Matar, it has changed his life. While the move to Sweden has taken him away from his family and friends, he is grateful for the new lease of life. ??sWhen I started parkour my family changed my mind about me,??? he says of how parkour has changed his life. ??sThey became proud because parkour is dan
EDITORIAL USE ONLY. IMAGES ONLY TO BE USED IN CONJUNCTION WITH EDITORIAL STORY.