wtorek, 17 października 2017
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Ostatni lot pilotów bliźniaków (4)

EN_01281371_0001 COV
Twin brothers who work as British Airways pilots celebrated their 60th birthdays by walking off their last ever flights, only 30 seconds apart. Captains Jeremy and Nick Hart both fly A320 aircraft on short-haul routes for British Airways. After being born 30 minutes apart they decided a fitting end to their flying careers would be to operate their last flights back into Heathrow on the same day, parking up their aircraft next to each other, only 30 seconds apart. Nick's last flight from Gothenburg landed at 12.34pm while his brother, Jeremy's last flight from Geneva landed at 12.35pm. Jeremy chose his last flight to be from Geneva as it was also the first destination he ever flew to. Jeremy joined British Airways 30 years ago in 1987. Nick joined from British Midland, which was bought by and then absorbed into British Airways in 2012. Between them, they have clocked up almost 45,000 flying hours, spent 3.5 years in the air and flown more than two million customers. Strictly speaking the twins are not identical, but look and sound so similar that they are often mistaken for one another. Nick said: ??sYears ago Jerry never mentioned to his colleagues at British Airways that he had a twin brother who flew for British Midland, and one day a British Airways pilot strode over to me at Heathrow and asked what on earth I thought I was doing dressing up in a British Midland uniform. It took a bit of explaining to convince him that I wasn???t Jerry!??? And since Nick joined British Airways, Jeremy has had some interesting experiences: ??sI???ve been constantly mistaken for Nick, and on one occasion I was called Nick the whole flight by my co-pilot. I???ve even been kissed by colleagues who think they know me. I guess it???s not a bad reaction!??? The twins became interested in flying at an early age and always knew they wanted to become pilots. Their father was an English lecturer who regularly took teaching jobs around the world, so the pair grew up moving every few y
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EN_01281371_0002 COV
Twin brothers who work as British Airways pilots celebrated their 60th birthdays by walking off their last ever flights, only 30 seconds apart. Captains Jeremy and Nick Hart both fly A320 aircraft on short-haul routes for British Airways. After being born 30 minutes apart they decided a fitting end to their flying careers would be to operate their last flights back into Heathrow on the same day, parking up their aircraft next to each other, only 30 seconds apart. Nick's last flight from Gothenburg landed at 12.34pm while his brother, Jeremy's last flight from Geneva landed at 12.35pm. Jeremy chose his last flight to be from Geneva as it was also the first destination he ever flew to. Jeremy joined British Airways 30 years ago in 1987. Nick joined from British Midland, which was bought by and then absorbed into British Airways in 2012. Between them, they have clocked up almost 45,000 flying hours, spent 3.5 years in the air and flown more than two million customers. Strictly speaking the twins are not identical, but look and sound so similar that they are often mistaken for one another. Nick said: ??sYears ago Jerry never mentioned to his colleagues at British Airways that he had a twin brother who flew for British Midland, and one day a British Airways pilot strode over to me at Heathrow and asked what on earth I thought I was doing dressing up in a British Midland uniform. It took a bit of explaining to convince him that I wasn???t Jerry!??? And since Nick joined British Airways, Jeremy has had some interesting experiences: ??sI???ve been constantly mistaken for Nick, and on one occasion I was called Nick the whole flight by my co-pilot. I???ve even been kissed by colleagues who think they know me. I guess it???s not a bad reaction!??? The twins became interested in flying at an early age and always knew they wanted to become pilots. Their father was an English lecturer who regularly took teaching jobs around the world, so the pair grew up moving every few y
EDITORIAL USE ONLY
EN_01281371_0003 COV
Twin brothers who work as British Airways pilots celebrated their 60th birthdays by walking off their last ever flights, only 30 seconds apart. Captains Jeremy and Nick Hart both fly A320 aircraft on short-haul routes for British Airways. After being born 30 minutes apart they decided a fitting end to their flying careers would be to operate their last flights back into Heathrow on the same day, parking up their aircraft next to each other, only 30 seconds apart. Nick's last flight from Gothenburg landed at 12.34pm while his brother, Jeremy's last flight from Geneva landed at 12.35pm. Jeremy chose his last flight to be from Geneva as it was also the first destination he ever flew to. Jeremy joined British Airways 30 years ago in 1987. Nick joined from British Midland, which was bought by and then absorbed into British Airways in 2012. Between them, they have clocked up almost 45,000 flying hours, spent 3.5 years in the air and flown more than two million customers. Strictly speaking the twins are not identical, but look and sound so similar that they are often mistaken for one another. Nick said: ??sYears ago Jerry never mentioned to his colleagues at British Airways that he had a twin brother who flew for British Midland, and one day a British Airways pilot strode over to me at Heathrow and asked what on earth I thought I was doing dressing up in a British Midland uniform. It took a bit of explaining to convince him that I wasn???t Jerry!??? And since Nick joined British Airways, Jeremy has had some interesting experiences: ??sI???ve been constantly mistaken for Nick, and on one occasion I was called Nick the whole flight by my co-pilot. I???ve even been kissed by colleagues who think they know me. I guess it???s not a bad reaction!??? The twins became interested in flying at an early age and always knew they wanted to become pilots. Their father was an English lecturer who regularly took teaching jobs around the world, so the pair grew up moving every few y
EDITORIAL USE ONLY
EN_01281371_0004 COV
Twin brothers who work as British Airways pilots celebrated their 60th birthdays by walking off their last ever flights, only 30 seconds apart. Captains Jeremy and Nick Hart both fly A320 aircraft on short-haul routes for British Airways. After being born 30 minutes apart they decided a fitting end to their flying careers would be to operate their last flights back into Heathrow on the same day, parking up their aircraft next to each other, only 30 seconds apart. Nick's last flight from Gothenburg landed at 12.34pm while his brother, Jeremy's last flight from Geneva landed at 12.35pm. Jeremy chose his last flight to be from Geneva as it was also the first destination he ever flew to. Jeremy joined British Airways 30 years ago in 1987. Nick joined from British Midland, which was bought by and then absorbed into British Airways in 2012. Between them, they have clocked up almost 45,000 flying hours, spent 3.5 years in the air and flown more than two million customers. Strictly speaking the twins are not identical, but look and sound so similar that they are often mistaken for one another. Nick said: ??sYears ago Jerry never mentioned to his colleagues at British Airways that he had a twin brother who flew for British Midland, and one day a British Airways pilot strode over to me at Heathrow and asked what on earth I thought I was doing dressing up in a British Midland uniform. It took a bit of explaining to convince him that I wasn???t Jerry!??? And since Nick joined British Airways, Jeremy has had some interesting experiences: ??sI???ve been constantly mistaken for Nick, and on one occasion I was called Nick the whole flight by my co-pilot. I???ve even been kissed by colleagues who think they know me. I guess it???s not a bad reaction!??? The twins became interested in flying at an early age and always knew they wanted to become pilots. Their father was an English lecturer who regularly took teaching jobs around the world, so the pair grew up moving every few y
EDITORIAL USE ONLY