środa, 18 października 2017
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Ratownicy z Meksyku - AFP (19)

EN_01280137_1614 AFP
Alberto Fuentes, a 58-year-old professional airplane pilot who volunteered to help in different tasks after the 7.1 earthquake that hit Mexico on September 19, poses for pictures in Mexico City on September 25, 2017. "Thanks God I can be here helping other people," was his remark during the photoshoot. A week after an earthquake that killed more than 300 people, a shaken Mexico was torn on September 26 between trying to get back to normal and keeping up an increasingly hopeless search for survivors. / AFP PHOTO / OMAR TORRES
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Evelyn De Sollano Luna, a 21-year-old criminology student who volunteered to unload provisions and food after the 7.1 earthquake that hit Mexico on September 19, poses for pictures in Mexico City on September 25, 2017. What struck De Sollano the most was the cooperation of handicapped for helping others. A week after an earthquake that killed more than 300 people, a shaken Mexico was torn on September 26 between trying to get back to normal and keeping up an increasingly hopeless search for survivors. / AFP PHOTO / OMAR TORRES
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Cesar Arevalo, a 33-year-old Salvadorean professional rescuer who worked in the recovery of bodies after the 7.1 earthquake that hit Mexico on September 19, poses for pictures in Mexico City on September 25, 2017. What struck Arevalo the most was "the children involved in this tragedy." A week after an earthquake that killed more than 300 people, a shaken Mexico was torn on September 26 between trying to get back to normal and keeping up an increasingly hopeless search for survivors. / AFP PHOTO / OMAR TORRES
EN_01280137_1617 AFP
Ran Maman, a 39-year-old member of the Israeli Defence Force who arrived to help in the rescue operations after the 7.1 earthquake that hit Mexico on September 19, poses for pictures in Mexico City on September 25, 2017. A week after an earthquake that killed more than 300 people, a shaken Mexico was torn on September 26 between trying to get back to normal and keeping up an increasingly hopeless search for survivors. / AFP PHOTO / OMAR TORRES
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Alejandra Lopez, a 34-year-old advertising producer who volunteered by coordinating other support personnel after the 7.1 earthquake that hit Mexico on September 19, poses for pictures in Mexico City on September 25, 2017. What struck Lopez the most was the amount of people helping. A week after an earthquake that killed more than 300 people, a shaken Mexico was torn on September 26 between trying to get back to normal and keeping up an increasingly hopeless search for survivors. / AFP PHOTO / OMAR TORRES
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Leticia Guevara, a 32-year-old nursing assistant who volunteered to remove debris, unload provisions and give support in the fences after the 7.1 earthquake that hit Mexico on September 19, poses for pictures in Mexico City on September 25, 2017. What struck Guevara the most was "the unity of the Mexican people." A week after an earthquake that killed more than 300 people, a shaken Mexico was torn on September 26 between trying to get back to normal and keeping up an increasingly hopeless search for survivors. / AFP PHOTO / OMAR TORRES
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Iliana Betzua, a 51-year-old nurse who volunteered to give medical assistance, remove debris and unload provisions after the 7.1 earthquake that hit Mexico on September 19, poses for pictures with a vest reading "God Blesses Those with Good Heart," in Mexico City on September 25, 2017. What struck Betzua the most was "the brotherhood" among the people. A week after an earthquake that killed more than 300 people, a shaken Mexico was torn on September 26 between trying to get back to normal and keeping up an increasingly hopeless search for survivors. / AFP PHOTO / OMAR TORRES
EN_01280137_1621 AFP
Ruben Sanchez, who volunteered as a rescuer after the 7.1 earthquake that hit Mexico on September 19, poses for pictures in Mexico City on September 25, 2017. What struck Sanchez the most was rescuing a girl alive. A week after an earthquake that killed more than 300 people, a shaken Mexico was torn on September 26 between trying to get back to normal and keeping up an increasingly hopeless search for survivors. / AFP PHOTO / OMAR TORRES
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Jeronimo Rodriguez, who volunteered as rescuer after the 7.1 earthquake that hit Mexico on September 19, poses for pictures in Mexico City on September 25, 2017. Was struck Rodriguez the most were the corpses he saw. A week after an earthquake that killed more than 300 people, a shaken Mexico was torn on September 26 between trying to get back to normal and keeping up an increasingly hopeless search for survivors. / AFP PHOTO / OMAR TORRES
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Captain Fernado Valencia, a member of the Firemen Corp of Baja California Sur who volunteered as fireman, paramedic and rescuer after the 7.1 earthquake that hit Mexico on September 19, poses for pictures in Mexico City on September 25, 2017. A week after an earthquake that killed more than 300 people, a shaken Mexico was torn on September 26 between trying to get back to normal and keeping up an increasingly hopeless search for survivors. / AFP PHOTO / OMAR TORRES
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Sargent Luis Aviles, a member of the Firemen Corp of Baja California Sur who volunteered as fireman, paramedic and rescuer after the 7.1 earthquake that hit Mexico on September 19, poses for pictures in Mexico City on September 25, 2017. What struck Aviles the most was the magnitud of help offered. A week after an earthquake that killed more than 300 people, a shaken Mexico was torn on September 26 between trying to get back to normal and keeping up an increasingly hopeless search for survivors. / AFP PHOTO / OMAR TORRES
EN_01280137_1625 AFP
Arlette Salyano, a lawyer that volunteered as specialist in integral management in disaster risks after the 7.1 earthquake that hit Mexico on September 19, poses for pictures in Mexico City on September 25, 2017. What struck Salyano the most was that the reaction of the people was the same as that for the quake of 1985. A week after an earthquake that killed more than 300 people, a shaken Mexico was torn on September 26 between trying to get back to normal and keeping up an increasingly hopeless search for survivors. / AFP PHOTO / OMAR TORRES
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Miguel Angel Sesma, a 40-year-old bachelor of public safety who volunteered in the integral risk management after the 7.1 earthquake hitted Central Mexico on September 19th, poses for a photograph on September 25, 2017. What struck Sesma the most was the age of the rescuers and the number of women helping. A week after an earthquake that killed more than 300 people, a shaken Mexico was torn on September 26 between trying to get back to normal and keeping up an increasingly hopeless search for survivors. / AFP PHOTO / OMAR TORRES
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Ismael Villegas, an electric technician who volunteered as a so-called "Topo" (mole) -- as the diggers who burrow their way into collapsed buildings are known -- after the 7.1 earthquake that hit Mexico on September 19, poses for pictures in Mexico City on September 25, 2017. What struck Villegas the most was that after many trips to help in other countries, he is now helping in his own. A week after an earthquake that killed more than 300 people, a shaken Mexico was torn on September 26 between trying to get back to normal and keeping up an increasingly hopeless search for survivors. / AFP PHOTO / OMAR TORRES
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Ruben Benitez, a 57-year-old coach, businessman, administrator and scuba diving instructor who volunteered as a so-called "Topo" (mole) -- as the diggers who burrow their way into collapsed buildings are known -- after the 7.1 earthquake that hit Mexico on September 19, poses for pictures in Mexico City on September 25, 2017. What struck Benitez the most was the people helping the families that lost everything. A week after an earthquake that killed more than 300 people, a shaken Mexico was torn on September 26 between trying to get back to normal and keeping up an increasingly hopeless search for survivors. / AFP PHOTO / OMAR TORRES
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Pola Diaz, a 53-year-old social worker and rescuer who volunteered as a so-called "Topo" (mole) -- as the diggers who burrow their way into collapsed buildings are known -- after the 7.1 earthquake that hit Mexico on September 19, poses for pictures in Mexico City on September 25, 2017. What struck Diaz the most was the young people helping. A week after an earthquake that killed more than 300 people, a shaken Mexico was torn on September 26 between trying to get back to normal and keeping up an increasingly hopeless search for survivors. / AFP PHOTO / OMAR TORRES
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Jorge Leonel de Cervantes, a37-year-old professional DJ who volunteered as rescuer, coordinator of refuse collection and cleaning mobile bathrooms after the 7.1 earthquake that hit Mexico on September 19, poses for pictures in Mexico City on September 25, 2017. What struck de Cervantes the most was the cooperation of Mexican people. A week after an earthquake that killed more than 300 people, a shaken Mexico was torn on September 26 between trying to get back to normal and keeping up an increasingly hopeless search for survivors. / AFP PHOTO / OMAR TORRES
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Alejandro Torres, a systems engineer who volunteered as a rescuer after the 7.1 earthquake that hit Mexico on September 19, poses for pictures in Mexico City on September 25, 2017. "I don't see caos, I see a lot people organized by the heart," Torres said during the photoshoot. A week after an earthquake that killed more than 300 people, a shaken Mexico was torn on September 26 between trying to get back to normal and keeping up an increasingly hopeless search for survivors. / AFP PHOTO / OMAR TORRES
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Cape Grisel Valencia, a member of the Firemen Corp of Baja California Sur who volunteered as fireman, paramedic and rescuer after the 7.1 earthquake that hit Mexico on September 19, poses for pictures in Mexico City on September 25, 2017. What struck Valencia the most was the number of volunteers. A week after an earthquake that killed more than 300 people, a shaken Mexico was torn on September 26 between trying to get back to normal and keeping up an increasingly hopeless search for survivors. / AFP PHOTO / OMAR TORRES