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Slumsy Manili - Sipa Press (77)

EN_01266531_0007 SIP
A child aimlessly walks through the streets of Happyland slums. Manila, Philippines. Saturday, July 1, 2017 . One year after Philippines President Duterte's land slide election win the plight of more than 600,000 residents of Manila's slums in suburban Tondo is getting worse. Poverty, severe malnutrition and disease is an everyday reality for the residents living within the putrid area just a few kilometres from central Manila. The worst of the conditions can be found at Tondo's ?Happyland' BRGY105 where the population has grown from around 3500 in in 2006 to more than 12,000 today. Happyland is literally built around a dump, or many dumps were people daily wade through rubbish looking for anything of value. Tons of chicken scraps are collected from takeaways garbage bins; recycled by boiling the sold to hungry families the the slums for a few pesos. The stench, heat and storms create a toxic combination of disease, but inadequate government health services mean the people of Tondo's worst slum just get sicker and sicker. Alan Niewald, founder of Las Vegas based US non profit Kilos Bayanihan, says the problem at Tondo is magnified at Happyland and has become a multi-generational trap. ?Education is extremely important in the Philippines but most children do not attend school because the parents have to choose whether to feed their children or send them to school then possibly not have enough food to feed them. I's a tough decision!,O Niewald says. ?There is a lack of opportunity to improve their lives. There should be more livelihood or community training programs available. There is also the age restrictions that most employers have. This also makes it harder to find a job. Most of the homeless are usually from the province that come to Manila to try and find a better life but end up homeless.O Niewald admits: ?I don't see anything being done by Duterte to change anything.O On his first anniversary Duterte declared he wanted to give every Filipino ?comfortable life for allO. Duterte should try telling that to the forgotten people of Happyland who live a daily nightmare.//MCDONNELLTED_1426.216
EN_01266531_0010 SIP
The entrance to BRGY 105 Happyland. Manila, Philippines. Saturday, July 1, 2017 . One year after Philippines President Duterte's land slide election win the plight of more than 600,000 residents of Manila's slums in suburban Tondo is getting worse. Poverty, severe malnutrition and disease is an everyday reality for the residents living within the putrid area just a few kilometres from central Manila. The worst of the conditions can be found at Tondo's ?Happyland' BRGY105 where the population has grown from around 3500 in in 2006 to more than 12,000 today. Happyland is literally built around a dump, or many dumps were people daily wade through rubbish looking for anything of value. Tons of chicken scraps are collected from takeaways garbage bins; recycled by boiling the sold to hungry families the the slums for a few pesos. The stench, heat and storms create a toxic combination of disease, but inadequate government health services mean the people of Tondo's worst slum just get sicker and sicker. Alan Niewald, founder of Las Vegas based US non profit Kilos Bayanihan, says the problem at Tondo is magnified at Happyland and has become a multi-generational trap. ?Education is extremely important in the Philippines but most children do not attend school because the parents have to choose whether to feed their children or send them to school then possibly not have enough food to feed them. I's a tough decision!,O Niewald says. ?There is a lack of opportunity to improve their lives. There should be more livelihood or community training programs available. There is also the age restrictions that most employers have. This also makes it harder to find a job. Most of the homeless are usually from the province that come to Manila to try and find a better life but end up homeless.O Niewald admits: ?I don't see anything being done by Duterte to change anything.O On his first anniversary Duterte declared he wanted to give every Filipino ?comfortable life for allO. Duterte should try telling that to the forgotten people of Happyland who live a daily nightmare.//MCDONNELLTED_1426.232
EN_01266531_0011 SIP
Boys playing on archaic computers in a corridor of Happyland slums. Manila, Philippines. Saturday, July 1, 2017 . One year after Philippines President Duterte's land slide election win the plight of more than 600,000 residents of Manila's slums in suburban Tondo is getting worse. Poverty, severe malnutrition and disease is an everyday reality for the residents living within the putrid area just a few kilometres from central Manila. The worst of the conditions can be found at Tondo's ?Happyland' BRGY105 where the population has grown from around 3500 in in 2006 to more than 12,000 today. Happyland is literally built around a dump, or many dumps were people daily wade through rubbish looking for anything of value. Tons of chicken scraps are collected from takeaways garbage bins; recycled by boiling the sold to hungry families the the slums for a few pesos. The stench, heat and storms create a toxic combination of disease, but inadequate government health services mean the people of Tondo's worst slum just get sicker and sicker. Alan Niewald, founder of Las Vegas based US non profit Kilos Bayanihan, says the problem at Tondo is magnified at Happyland and has become a multi-generational trap. ?Education is extremely important in the Philippines but most children do not attend school because the parents have to choose whether to feed their children or send them to school then possibly not have enough food to feed them. I's a tough decision!,O Niewald says. ?There is a lack of opportunity to improve their lives. There should be more livelihood or community training programs available. There is also the age restrictions that most employers have. This also makes it harder to find a job. Most of the homeless are usually from the province that come to Manila to try and find a better life but end up homeless.O Niewald admits: ?I don't see anything being done by Duterte to change anything.O On his first anniversary Duterte declared he wanted to give every Filipino ?comfortable life for allO. Duterte should try telling that to the forgotten people of Happyland who live a daily nightmare.//MCDONNELLTED_1426.231
EN_01266531_0012 SIP
A boy at Happyland slums cools off whilst another throws rubbish into Manila Bay. Manila, Philippines. Saturday, July 1, 2017 . One year after Philippines President Duterte's land slide election win the plight of more than 600,000 residents of Manila's slums in suburban Tondo is getting worse. Poverty, severe malnutrition and disease is an everyday reality for the residents living within the putrid area just a few kilometres from central Manila. The worst of the conditions can be found at Tondo's ?Happyland' BRGY105 where the population has grown from around 3500 in in 2006 to more than 12,000 today. Happyland is literally built around a dump, or many dumps were people daily wade through rubbish looking for anything of value. Tons of chicken scraps are collected from takeaways garbage bins; recycled by boiling the sold to hungry families the the slums for a few pesos. The stench, heat and storms create a toxic combination of disease, but inadequate government health services mean the people of Tondo's worst slum just get sicker and sicker. Alan Niewald, founder of Las Vegas based US non profit Kilos Bayanihan, says the problem at Tondo is magnified at Happyland and has become a multi-generational trap. ?Education is extremely important in the Philippines but most children do not attend school because the parents have to choose whether to feed their children or send them to school then possibly not have enough food to feed them. I's a tough decision!,O Niewald says. ?There is a lack of opportunity to improve their lives. There should be more livelihood or community training programs available. There is also the age restrictions that most employers have. This also makes it harder to find a job. Most of the homeless are usually from the province that come to Manila to try and find a better life but end up homeless.O Niewald admits: ?I don't see anything being done by Duterte to change anything.O On his first anniversary Duterte declared he wanted to give every Filipino ?comfortable life for allO. Duterte should try telling that to the forgotten people of Happyland who live a daily nightmare.//MCDONNELLTED_1426.230
EN_01266531_0013 SIP
Happyland slums is next to the Port on Manila Bay. Manila, Philippines. Saturday, July 1, 2017 . One year after Philippines President Duterte's land slide election win the plight of more than 600,000 residents of Manila's slums in suburban Tondo is getting worse. Poverty, severe malnutrition and disease is an everyday reality for the residents living within the putrid area just a few kilometres from central Manila. The worst of the conditions can be found at Tondo's ?Happyland' BRGY105 where the population has grown from around 3500 in in 2006 to more than 12,000 today. Happyland is literally built around a dump, or many dumps were people daily wade through rubbish looking for anything of value. Tons of chicken scraps are collected from takeaways garbage bins; recycled by boiling the sold to hungry families the the slums for a few pesos. The stench, heat and storms create a toxic combination of disease, but inadequate government health services mean the people of Tondo's worst slum just get sicker and sicker. Alan Niewald, founder of Las Vegas based US non profit Kilos Bayanihan, says the problem at Tondo is magnified at Happyland and has become a multi-generational trap. ?Education is extremely important in the Philippines but most children do not attend school because the parents have to choose whether to feed their children or send them to school then possibly not have enough food to feed them. I's a tough decision!,O Niewald says. ?There is a lack of opportunity to improve their lives. There should be more livelihood or community training programs available. There is also the age restrictions that most employers have. This also makes it harder to find a job. Most of the homeless are usually from the province that come to Manila to try and find a better life but end up homeless.O Niewald admits: ?I don't see anything being done by Duterte to change anything.O On his first anniversary Duterte declared he wanted to give every Filipino ?comfortable life for allO. Duterte should try telling that to the forgotten people of Happyland who live a daily nightmare.//MCDONNELLTED_1426.228
EN_01266531_0014 SIP
A boy at Happyland slums. Manila, Philippines. Saturday, July 1, 2017 . One year after Philippines President Duterte's land slide election win the plight of more than 600,000 residents of Manila's slums in suburban Tondo is getting worse. Poverty, severe malnutrition and disease is an everyday reality for the residents living within the putrid area just a few kilometres from central Manila. The worst of the conditions can be found at Tondo's ?Happyland' BRGY105 where the population has grown from around 3500 in in 2006 to more than 12,000 today. Happyland is literally built around a dump, or many dumps were people daily wade through rubbish looking for anything of value. Tons of chicken scraps are collected from takeaways garbage bins; recycled by boiling the sold to hungry families the the slums for a few pesos. The stench, heat and storms create a toxic combination of disease, but inadequate government health services mean the people of Tondo's worst slum just get sicker and sicker. Alan Niewald, founder of Las Vegas based US non profit Kilos Bayanihan, says the problem at Tondo is magnified at Happyland and has become a multi-generational trap. ?Education is extremely important in the Philippines but most children do not attend school because the parents have to choose whether to feed their children or send them to school then possibly not have enough food to feed them. I's a tough decision!,O Niewald says. ?There is a lack of opportunity to improve their lives. There should be more livelihood or community training programs available. There is also the age restrictions that most employers have. This also makes it harder to find a job. Most of the homeless are usually from the province that come to Manila to try and find a better life but end up homeless.O Niewald admits: ?I don't see anything being done by Duterte to change anything.O On his first anniversary Duterte declared he wanted to give every Filipino ?comfortable life for allO. Duterte should try telling that to the forgotten people of Happyland who live a daily nightmare.//MCDONNELLTED_1426.227
EN_01266531_0015 SIP
A typical corridor at Happyland slums. Living conditions are horrific. Manila, Philippines. Saturday, July 1, 2017 . One year after Philippines President Duterte's land slide election win the plight of more than 600,000 residents of Manila's slums in suburban Tondo is getting worse. Poverty, severe malnutrition and disease is an everyday reality for the residents living within the putrid area just a few kilometres from central Manila. The worst of the conditions can be found at Tondo's ?Happyland' BRGY105 where the population has grown from around 3500 in in 2006 to more than 12,000 today. Happyland is literally built around a dump, or many dumps were people daily wade through rubbish looking for anything of value. Tons of chicken scraps are collected from takeaways garbage bins; recycled by boiling the sold to hungry families the the slums for a few pesos. The stench, heat and storms create a toxic combination of disease, but inadequate government health services mean the people of Tondo's worst slum just get sicker and sicker. Alan Niewald, founder of Las Vegas based US non profit Kilos Bayanihan, says the problem at Tondo is magnified at Happyland and has become a multi-generational trap. ?Education is extremely important in the Philippines but most children do not attend school because the parents have to choose whether to feed their children or send them to school then possibly not have enough food to feed them. I's a tough decision!,O Niewald says. ?There is a lack of opportunity to improve their lives. There should be more livelihood or community training programs available. There is also the age restrictions that most employers have. This also makes it harder to find a job. Most of the homeless are usually from the province that come to Manila to try and find a better life but end up homeless.O Niewald admits: ?I don't see anything being done by Duterte to change anything.O On his first anniversary Duterte declared he wanted to give every Filipino ?comfortable life for allO. Duterte should try telling that to the forgotten people of Happyland who live a daily nightmare.//MCDONNELLTED_1426.226
EN_01266531_0016 SIP
Children pray as part of the feeding program run by US non profit Kilos Bayanihan at Happyland slums. Manila, Philippines. Saturday, July 1, 2017 . One year after Philippines President Duterte's land slide election win the plight of more than 600,000 residents of Manila's slums in suburban Tondo is getting worse. Poverty, severe malnutrition and disease is an everyday reality for the residents living within the putrid area just a few kilometres from central Manila. The worst of the conditions can be found at Tondo's ?Happyland' BRGY105 where the population has grown from around 3500 in in 2006 to more than 12,000 today. Happyland is literally built around a dump, or many dumps were people daily wade through rubbish looking for anything of value. Tons of chicken scraps are collected from takeaways garbage bins; recycled by boiling the sold to hungry families the the slums for a few pesos. The stench, heat and storms create a toxic combination of disease, but inadequate government health services mean the people of Tondo's worst slum just get sicker and sicker. Alan Niewald, founder of Las Vegas based US non profit Kilos Bayanihan, says the problem at Tondo is magnified at Happyland and has become a multi-generational trap. ?Education is extremely important in the Philippines but most children do not attend school because the parents have to choose whether to feed their children or send them to school then possibly not have enough food to feed them. I's a tough decision!,O Niewald says. ?There is a lack of opportunity to improve their lives. There should be more livelihood or community training programs available. There is also the age restrictions that most employers have. This also makes it harder to find a job. Most of the homeless are usually from the province that come to Manila to try and find a better life but end up homeless.O Niewald admits: ?I don't see anything being done by Duterte to change anything.O On his first anniversary Duterte declared he wanted to give every Filipino ?comfortable life for allO. Duterte should try telling that to the forgotten people of Happyland who live a daily nightmare.//MCDONNELLTED_1426.225
EN_01266531_0017 SIP
A couple living in a roofless platform hide under discarded rubbish to beat the heat at Happyland slums. Manila, Philippines. Saturday, July 1, 2017 . One year after Philippines President Duterte's land slide election win the plight of more than 600,000 residents of Manila's slums in suburban Tondo is getting worse. Poverty, severe malnutrition and disease is an everyday reality for the residents living within the putrid area just a few kilometres from central Manila. The worst of the conditions can be found at Tondo's ?Happyland' BRGY105 where the population has grown from around 3500 in in 2006 to more than 12,000 today. Happyland is literally built around a dump, or many dumps were people daily wade through rubbish looking for anything of value. Tons of chicken scraps are collected from takeaways garbage bins; recycled by boiling the sold to hungry families the the slums for a few pesos. The stench, heat and storms create a toxic combination of disease, but inadequate government health services mean the people of Tondo's worst slum just get sicker and sicker. Alan Niewald, founder of Las Vegas based US non profit Kilos Bayanihan, says the problem at Tondo is magnified at Happyland and has become a multi-generational trap. ?Education is extremely important in the Philippines but most children do not attend school because the parents have to choose whether to feed their children or send them to school then possibly not have enough food to feed them. I's a tough decision!,O Niewald says. ?There is a lack of opportunity to improve their lives. There should be more livelihood or community training programs available. There is also the age restrictions that most employers have. This also makes it harder to find a job. Most of the homeless are usually from the province that come to Manila to try and find a better life but end up homeless.O Niewald admits: ?I don't see anything being done by Duterte to change anything.O On his first anniversary Duterte declared he wanted to give every Filipino ?comfortable life for allO. Duterte should try telling that to the forgotten people of Happyland who live a daily nightmare.//MCDONNELLTED_1426.220
EN_01266531_0018 SIP
A boy about to enter his small home at Happyland slums. Manila, Philippines. Saturday, July 1, 2017 . One year after Philippines President Duterte's land slide election win the plight of more than 600,000 residents of Manila's slums in suburban Tondo is getting worse. Poverty, severe malnutrition and disease is an everyday reality for the residents living within the putrid area just a few kilometres from central Manila. The worst of the conditions can be found at Tondo's ?Happyland' BRGY105 where the population has grown from around 3500 in in 2006 to more than 12,000 today. Happyland is literally built around a dump, or many dumps were people daily wade through rubbish looking for anything of value. Tons of chicken scraps are collected from takeaways garbage bins; recycled by boiling the sold to hungry families the the slums for a few pesos. The stench, heat and storms create a toxic combination of disease, but inadequate government health services mean the people of Tondo's worst slum just get sicker and sicker. Alan Niewald, founder of Las Vegas based US non profit Kilos Bayanihan, says the problem at Tondo is magnified at Happyland and has become a multi-generational trap. ?Education is extremely important in the Philippines but most children do not attend school because the parents have to choose whether to feed their children or send them to school then possibly not have enough food to feed them. I's a tough decision!,O Niewald says. ?There is a lack of opportunity to improve their lives. There should be more livelihood or community training programs available. There is also the age restrictions that most employers have. This also makes it harder to find a job. Most of the homeless are usually from the province that come to Manila to try and find a better life but end up homeless.O Niewald admits: ?I don't see anything being done by Duterte to change anything.O On his first anniversary Duterte declared he wanted to give every Filipino ?comfortable life for allO. Duterte should try telling that to the forgotten people of Happyland who live a daily nightmare.//MCDONNELLTED_1426.222
EN_01266531_0019 SIP
A young man separates rubbish at Happyland slums. Manila, Philippines. Saturday, July 1, 2017 . One year after Philippines President Duterte's land slide election win the plight of more than 600,000 residents of Manila's slums in suburban Tondo is getting worse. Poverty, severe malnutrition and disease is an everyday reality for the residents living within the putrid area just a few kilometres from central Manila. The worst of the conditions can be found at Tondo's ?Happyland' BRGY105 where the population has grown from around 3500 in in 2006 to more than 12,000 today. Happyland is literally built around a dump, or many dumps were people daily wade through rubbish looking for anything of value. Tons of chicken scraps are collected from takeaways garbage bins; recycled by boiling the sold to hungry families the the slums for a few pesos. The stench, heat and storms create a toxic combination of disease, but inadequate government health services mean the people of Tondo's worst slum just get sicker and sicker. Alan Niewald, founder of Las Vegas based US non profit Kilos Bayanihan, says the problem at Tondo is magnified at Happyland and has become a multi-generational trap. ?Education is extremely important in the Philippines but most children do not attend school because the parents have to choose whether to feed their children or send them to school then possibly not have enough food to feed them. I's a tough decision!,O Niewald says. ?There is a lack of opportunity to improve their lives. There should be more livelihood or community training programs available. There is also the age restrictions that most employers have. This also makes it harder to find a job. Most of the homeless are usually from the province that come to Manila to try and find a better life but end up homeless.O Niewald admits: ?I don't see anything being done by Duterte to change anything.O On his first anniversary Duterte declared he wanted to give every Filipino ?comfortable life for allO. Duterte should try telling that to the forgotten people of Happyland who live a daily nightmare.//MCDONNELLTED_1426.219
EN_01266531_0020 SIP
A typical scene at Happyland slums. Manila, Philippines. Saturday, July 1, 2017 . One year after Philippines President Duterte's land slide election win the plight of more than 600,000 residents of Manila's slums in suburban Tondo is getting worse. Poverty, severe malnutrition and disease is an everyday reality for the residents living within the putrid area just a few kilometres from central Manila. The worst of the conditions can be found at Tondo's ?Happyland' BRGY105 where the population has grown from around 3500 in in 2006 to more than 12,000 today. Happyland is literally built around a dump, or many dumps were people daily wade through rubbish looking for anything of value. Tons of chicken scraps are collected from takeaways garbage bins; recycled by boiling the sold to hungry families the the slums for a few pesos. The stench, heat and storms create a toxic combination of disease, but inadequate government health services mean the people of Tondo's worst slum just get sicker and sicker. Alan Niewald, founder of Las Vegas based US non profit Kilos Bayanihan, says the problem at Tondo is magnified at Happyland and has become a multi-generational trap. ?Education is extremely important in the Philippines but most children do not attend school because the parents have to choose whether to feed their children or send them to school then possibly not have enough food to feed them. I's a tough decision!,O Niewald says. ?There is a lack of opportunity to improve their lives. There should be more livelihood or community training programs available. There is also the age restrictions that most employers have. This also makes it harder to find a job. Most of the homeless are usually from the province that come to Manila to try and find a better life but end up homeless.O Niewald admits: ?I don't see anything being done by Duterte to change anything.O On his first anniversary Duterte declared he wanted to give every Filipino ?comfortable life for allO. Duterte should try telling that to the forgotten people of Happyland who live a daily nightmare.//MCDONNELLTED_1426.218
EN_01266531_0021 SIP
A child walks through mud and slime at the Happyland slums. Manila, Philippines. Saturday, July 1, 2017 . One year after Philippines President Duterte's land slide election win the plight of more than 600,000 residents of Manila's slums in suburban Tondo is getting worse. Poverty, severe malnutrition and disease is an everyday reality for the residents living within the putrid area just a few kilometres from central Manila. The worst of the conditions can be found at Tondo's ?Happyland' BRGY105 where the population has grown from around 3500 in in 2006 to more than 12,000 today. Happyland is literally built around a dump, or many dumps were people daily wade through rubbish looking for anything of value. Tons of chicken scraps are collected from takeaways garbage bins; recycled by boiling the sold to hungry families the the slums for a few pesos. The stench, heat and storms create a toxic combination of disease, but inadequate government health services mean the people of Tondo's worst slum just get sicker and sicker. Alan Niewald, founder of Las Vegas based US non profit Kilos Bayanihan, says the problem at Tondo is magnified at Happyland and has become a multi-generational trap. ?Education is extremely important in the Philippines but most children do not attend school because the parents have to choose whether to feed their children or send them to school then possibly not have enough food to feed them. I's a tough decision!,O Niewald says. ?There is a lack of opportunity to improve their lives. There should be more livelihood or community training programs available. There is also the age restrictions that most employers have. This also makes it harder to find a job. Most of the homeless are usually from the province that come to Manila to try and find a better life but end up homeless.O Niewald admits: ?I don't see anything being done by Duterte to change anything.O On his first anniversary Duterte declared he wanted to give every Filipino ?comfortable life for allO. Duterte should try telling that to the forgotten people of Happyland who live a daily nightmare.//MCDONNELLTED_1426.215
EN_01266531_0022 SIP
The streets of mud and rubbish at Happyland slums. Diseases and sickness is rife, but 'residents' get very little assistance from the Duterte government. Manila, Philippines. Saturday, July 1, 2017 . One year after Philippines President Duterte's land slide election win the plight of more than 600,000 residents of Manila's slums in suburban Tondo is getting worse. Poverty, severe malnutrition and disease is an everyday reality for the residents living within the putrid area just a few kilometres from central Manila. The worst of the conditions can be found at Tondo's ?Happyland' BRGY105 where the population has grown from around 3500 in in 2006 to more than 12,000 today. Happyland is literally built around a dump, or many dumps were people daily wade through rubbish looking for anything of value. Tons of chicken scraps are collected from takeaways garbage bins; recycled by boiling the sold to hungry families the the slums for a few pesos. The stench, heat and storms create a toxic combination of disease, but inadequate government health services mean the people of Tondo's worst slum just get sicker and sicker. Alan Niewald, founder of Las Vegas based US non profit Kilos Bayanihan, says the problem at Tondo is magnified at Happyland and has become a multi-generational trap. ?Education is extremely important in the Philippines but most children do not attend school because the parents have to choose whether to feed their children or send them to school then possibly not have enough food to feed them. I's a tough decision!,O Niewald says. ?There is a lack of opportunity to improve their lives. There should be more livelihood or community training programs available. There is also the age restrictions that most employers have. This also makes it harder to find a job. Most of the homeless are usually from the province that come to Manila to try and find a better life but end up homeless.O Niewald admits: ?I don't see anything being done by Duterte to change anything.O On his first anniversary Duterte declared he wanted to give every Filipino ?comfortable life for allO. Duterte should try telling that to the forgotten people of Happyland who live a daily nightmare.//MCDONNELLTED_1426.214
EN_01266531_0024 SIP
A man separating rubbish at Happyland slums. Manila, Philippines. Saturday, July 1, 2017 . One year after Philippines President Duterte's land slide election win the plight of more than 600,000 residents of Manila's slums in suburban Tondo is getting worse. Poverty, severe malnutrition and disease is an everyday reality for the residents living within the putrid area just a few kilometres from central Manila. The worst of the conditions can be found at Tondo's ?Happyland' BRGY105 where the population has grown from around 3500 in in 2006 to more than 12,000 today. Happyland is literally built around a dump, or many dumps were people daily wade through rubbish looking for anything of value. Tons of chicken scraps are collected from takeaways garbage bins; recycled by boiling the sold to hungry families the the slums for a few pesos. The stench, heat and storms create a toxic combination of disease, but inadequate government health services mean the people of Tondo's worst slum just get sicker and sicker. Alan Niewald, founder of Las Vegas based US non profit Kilos Bayanihan, says the problem at Tondo is magnified at Happyland and has become a multi-generational trap. ?Education is extremely important in the Philippines but most children do not attend school because the parents have to choose whether to feed their children or send them to school then possibly not have enough food to feed them. I's a tough decision!,O Niewald says. ?There is a lack of opportunity to improve their lives. There should be more livelihood or community training programs available. There is also the age restrictions that most employers have. This also makes it harder to find a job. Most of the homeless are usually from the province that come to Manila to try and find a better life but end up homeless.O Niewald admits: ?I don't see anything being done by Duterte to change anything.O On his first anniversary Duterte declared he wanted to give every Filipino ?comfortable life for allO. Duterte should try telling that to the forgotten people of Happyland who live a daily nightmare.//MCDONNELLTED_1426.213
EN_01266531_0025 SIP
More garbage arrives at Happyland for sorting. Manila, Philippines. Saturday, July 1, 2017 . One year after Philippines President Duterte's land slide election win the plight of more than 600,000 residents of Manila's slums in suburban Tondo is getting worse. Poverty, severe malnutrition and disease is an everyday reality for the residents living within the putrid area just a few kilometres from central Manila. The worst of the conditions can be found at Tondo's ?Happyland' BRGY105 where the population has grown from around 3500 in in 2006 to more than 12,000 today. Happyland is literally built around a dump, or many dumps were people daily wade through rubbish looking for anything of value. Tons of chicken scraps are collected from takeaways garbage bins; recycled by boiling the sold to hungry families the the slums for a few pesos. The stench, heat and storms create a toxic combination of disease, but inadequate government health services mean the people of Tondo's worst slum just get sicker and sicker. Alan Niewald, founder of Las Vegas based US non profit Kilos Bayanihan, says the problem at Tondo is magnified at Happyland and has become a multi-generational trap. ?Education is extremely important in the Philippines but most children do not attend school because the parents have to choose whether to feed their children or send them to school then possibly not have enough food to feed them. I's a tough decision!,O Niewald says. ?There is a lack of opportunity to improve their lives. There should be more livelihood or community training programs available. There is also the age restrictions that most employers have. This also makes it harder to find a job. Most of the homeless are usually from the province that come to Manila to try and find a better life but end up homeless.O Niewald admits: ?I don't see anything being done by Duterte to change anything.O On his first anniversary Duterte declared he wanted to give every Filipino ?comfortable life for allO. Duterte should try telling that to the forgotten people of Happyland who live a daily nightmare.//MCDONNELLTED_1426.210
EN_01266531_0026 SIP
A young boy stares out the makeshift window of his tin home at Happyland. Manila, Philippines. Saturday, July 1, 2017 . One year after Philippines President Duterte's land slide election win the plight of more than 600,000 residents of Manila's slums in suburban Tondo is getting worse. Poverty, severe malnutrition and disease is an everyday reality for the residents living within the putrid area just a few kilometres from central Manila. The worst of the conditions can be found at Tondo's ?Happyland' BRGY105 where the population has grown from around 3500 in in 2006 to more than 12,000 today. Happyland is literally built around a dump, or many dumps were people daily wade through rubbish looking for anything of value. Tons of chicken scraps are collected from takeaways garbage bins; recycled by boiling the sold to hungry families the the slums for a few pesos. The stench, heat and storms create a toxic combination of disease, but inadequate government health services mean the people of Tondo's worst slum just get sicker and sicker. Alan Niewald, founder of Las Vegas based US non profit Kilos Bayanihan, says the problem at Tondo is magnified at Happyland and has become a multi-generational trap. ?Education is extremely important in the Philippines but most children do not attend school because the parents have to choose whether to feed their children or send them to school then possibly not have enough food to feed them. I's a tough decision!,O Niewald says. ?There is a lack of opportunity to improve their lives. There should be more livelihood or community training programs available. There is also the age restrictions that most employers have. This also makes it harder to find a job. Most of the homeless are usually from the province that come to Manila to try and find a better life but end up homeless.O Niewald admits: ?I don't see anything being done by Duterte to change anything.O On his first anniversary Duterte declared he wanted to give every Filipino ?comfortable life for allO. Duterte should try telling that to the forgotten people of Happyland who live a daily nightmare.//MCDONNELLTED_1426.209
EN_01266531_0030 SIP
Children wash their hands as part of a program run by US non profit Kilos Bayanihan at Happyland slums. Manila, Philippines. Saturday, July 1, 2017 . One year after Philippines President Duterte's land slide election win the plight of more than 600,000 residents of Manila's slums in suburban Tondo is getting worse. Poverty, severe malnutrition and disease is an everyday reality for the residents living within the putrid area just a few kilometres from central Manila. The worst of the conditions can be found at Tondo's ?Happyland' BRGY105 where the population has grown from around 3500 in in 2006 to more than 12,000 today. Happyland is literally built around a dump, or many dumps were people daily wade through rubbish looking for anything of value. Tons of chicken scraps are collected from takeaways garbage bins; recycled by boiling the sold to hungry families the the slums for a few pesos. The stench, heat and storms create a toxic combination of disease, but inadequate government health services mean the people of Tondo's worst slum just get sicker and sicker. Alan Niewald, founder of Las Vegas based US non profit Kilos Bayanihan, says the problem at Tondo is magnified at Happyland and has become a multi-generational trap. ?Education is extremely important in the Philippines but most children do not attend school because the parents have to choose whether to feed their children or send them to school then possibly not have enough food to feed them. I's a tough decision!,O Niewald says. ?There is a lack of opportunity to improve their lives. There should be more livelihood or community training programs available. There is also the age restrictions that most employers have. This also makes it harder to find a job. Most of the homeless are usually from the province that come to Manila to try and find a better life but end up homeless.O Niewald admits: ?I don't see anything being done by Duterte to change anything.O On his first anniversary Duterte declared he wanted to give every Filipino ?comfortable life for allO. Duterte should try telling that to the forgotten people of Happyland who live a daily nightmare.//MCDONNELLTED_1426.224
EN_01266531_0031 SIP
A man sorts rubbish at Happyland slums. Manila, Philippines. Saturday, July 1, 2017 . One year after Philippines President Duterte's land slide election win the plight of more than 600,000 residents of Manila's slums in suburban Tondo is getting worse. Poverty, severe malnutrition and disease is an everyday reality for the residents living within the putrid area just a few kilometres from central Manila. The worst of the conditions can be found at Tondo's ?Happyland' BRGY105 where the population has grown from around 3500 in in 2006 to more than 12,000 today. Happyland is literally built around a dump, or many dumps were people daily wade through rubbish looking for anything of value. Tons of chicken scraps are collected from takeaways garbage bins; recycled by boiling the sold to hungry families the the slums for a few pesos. The stench, heat and storms create a toxic combination of disease, but inadequate government health services mean the people of Tondo's worst slum just get sicker and sicker. Alan Niewald, founder of Las Vegas based US non profit Kilos Bayanihan, says the problem at Tondo is magnified at Happyland and has become a multi-generational trap. ?Education is extremely important in the Philippines but most children do not attend school because the parents have to choose whether to feed their children or send them to school then possibly not have enough food to feed them. I's a tough decision!,O Niewald says. ?There is a lack of opportunity to improve their lives. There should be more livelihood or community training programs available. There is also the age restrictions that most employers have. This also makes it harder to find a job. Most of the homeless are usually from the province that come to Manila to try and find a better life but end up homeless.O Niewald admits: ?I don't see anything being done by Duterte to change anything.O On his first anniversary Duterte declared he wanted to give every Filipino ?comfortable life for allO. Duterte should try telling that to the forgotten people of Happyland who live a daily nightmare.//MCDONNELLTED_1426.217
EN_01266531_0033 SIP
A woman sorting rubbish at Happyland slums. Manila, Philippines. Saturday, July 1, 2017 . One year after Philippines President Duterte's land slide election win the plight of more than 600,000 residents of Manila's slums in suburban Tondo is getting worse. Poverty, severe malnutrition and disease is an everyday reality for the residents living within the putrid area just a few kilometres from central Manila. The worst of the conditions can be found at Tondo's ?Happyland' BRGY105 where the population has grown from around 3500 in in 2006 to more than 12,000 today. Happyland is literally built around a dump, or many dumps were people daily wade through rubbish looking for anything of value. Tons of chicken scraps are collected from takeaways garbage bins; recycled by boiling the sold to hungry families the the slums for a few pesos. The stench, heat and storms create a toxic combination of disease, but inadequate government health services mean the people of Tondo's worst slum just get sicker and sicker. Alan Niewald, founder of Las Vegas based US non profit Kilos Bayanihan, says the problem at Tondo is magnified at Happyland and has become a multi-generational trap. ?Education is extremely important in the Philippines but most children do not attend school because the parents have to choose whether to feed their children or send them to school then possibly not have enough food to feed them. I's a tough decision!,O Niewald says. ?There is a lack of opportunity to improve their lives. There should be more livelihood or community training programs available. There is also the age restrictions that most employers have. This also makes it harder to find a job. Most of the homeless are usually from the province that come to Manila to try and find a better life but end up homeless.O Niewald admits: ?I don't see anything being done by Duterte to change anything.O On his first anniversary Duterte declared he wanted to give every Filipino ?comfortable life for allO. Duterte should try telling that to the forgotten people of Happyland who live a daily nightmare.//MCDONNELLTED_1426.212
EN_01266531_0051 SIP
Boys play on a bike at Happyland slums. Manila, Philippines. Saturday, July 1, 2017 . One year after Philippines President Duterte's land slide election win the plight of more than 600,000 residents of Manila's slums in suburban Tondo is getting worse. Poverty, severe malnutrition and disease is an everyday reality for the residents living within the putrid area just a few kilometres from central Manila. The worst of the conditions can be found at Tondo's ?Happyland' BRGY105 where the population has grown from around 3500 in in 2006 to more than 12,000 today. Happyland is literally built around a dump, or many dumps were people daily wade through rubbish looking for anything of value. Tons of chicken scraps are collected from takeaways garbage bins; recycled by boiling the sold to hungry families the the slums for a few pesos. The stench, heat and storms create a toxic combination of disease, but inadequate government health services mean the people of Tondo's worst slum just get sicker and sicker. Alan Niewald, founder of Las Vegas based US non profit Kilos Bayanihan, says the problem at Tondo is magnified at Happyland and has become a multi-generational trap. ?Education is extremely important in the Philippines but most children do not attend school because the parents have to choose whether to feed their children or send them to school then possibly not have enough food to feed them. I's a tough decision!,O Niewald says. ?There is a lack of opportunity to improve their lives. There should be more livelihood or community training programs available. There is also the age restrictions that most employers have. This also makes it harder to find a job. Most of the homeless are usually from the province that come to Manila to try and find a better life but end up homeless.O Niewald admits: ?I don't see anything being done by Duterte to change anything.O On his first anniversary Duterte declared he wanted to give every Filipino ?comfortable life for allO. Duterte should try telling that to the forgotten people of Happyland who live a daily nightmare.//MCDONNELLTED_1426.211
EN_01266531_0068 SIP
??????????. Manila, Philippines. Saturday, July 1, 2017 . One year after Philippines President Duterte???s land slide election win the plight of more than 600,000 residents of Manila???s slums in suburban Tondo is getting worse. Poverty, severe malnutrition and disease is an everyday reality for the residents living within the putrid area just a few kilometres from central Manila. The worst of the conditions can be found at Tondo???s ???Happyland??? BRGY105 where the population has grown from around 3500 in in 2006 to more than 12,000 today. Happyland is literally built around a dump, or many dumps were people daily wade through rubbish looking for anything of value. Tons of chicken scraps are collected from takeaways garbage bins; recycled by boiling the sold to hungry families the the slums for a few pesos. The stench, heat and storms create a toxic combination of disease, but inadequate government health services mean the people of Tondo???s worst slum just get sicker and sicker. Alan Niewald, founder of Las Vegas based US non profit Kilos Bayanihan, says the problem at Tondo is magnified at Happyland and has become a multi-generational trap. ??sEducation is extremely important in the Philippines but most children do not attend school because the parents have to choose whether to feed their children or send them to school then possibly not have enough food to feed them. I???s a tough decision!,??? Niewald says. ??sThere is a lack of opportunity to improve their lives. There should be more livelihood or community training programs available. There is also the age restrictions that most employers have. This also makes it harder to find a job. Most of the homeless are usually from the province that come to Manila to try and find a better life but end up homeless.??? Niewald admits: ??sI don't see anything being done by Duterte to change anything.??? On his first anniversary Duterte declared he wanted to give every Filipino ??scomfortable life for all???. Duterte should try telling that to the forgotten people of Happyland who live a daily nightmare.//MCDONNELLTED_1426.229
EN_01266531_0074 SIP
Boys take a moment to have fun at the Happyland slums Manila, Philippines. Saturday, July 1, 2017 . One year after Philippines President Duterte's land slide election win the plight of more than 600,000 residents of Manila's slums in suburban Tondo is getting worse. Poverty, severe malnutrition and disease is an everyday reality for the residents living within the putrid area just a few kilometres from central Manila. The worst of the conditions can be found at Tondo's ?Happyland' BRGY105 where the population has grown from around 3500 in in 2006 to more than 12,000 today. Happyland is literally built around a dump, or many dumps were people daily wade through rubbish looking for anything of value. Tons of chicken scraps are collected from takeaways garbage bins; recycled by boiling the sold to hungry families the the slums for a few pesos. The stench, heat and storms create a toxic combination of disease, but inadequate government health services mean the people of Tondo's worst slum just get sicker and sicker. Alan Niewald, founder of Las Vegas based US non profit Kilos Bayanihan, says the problem at Tondo is magnified at Happyland and has become a multi-generational trap. ?Education is extremely important in the Philippines but most children do not attend school because the parents have to choose whether to feed their children or send them to school then possibly not have enough food to feed them. I's a tough decision!,O Niewald says. ?There is a lack of opportunity to improve their lives. There should be more livelihood or community training programs available. There is also the age restrictions that most employers have. This also makes it harder to find a job. Most of the homeless are usually from the province that come to Manila to try and find a better life but end up homeless.O Niewald admits: ?I don't see anything being done by Duterte to change anything.O On his first anniversary Duterte declared he wanted to give every Filipino ?comfortable life for allO. Duterte should try telling that to the forgotten people of Happyland who live a daily nightmare.//MCDONNELLTED_1426.223
EN_01266531_0077 SIP
A young father carries his baby through a mound of rubbish at Happyland slums. Manila, Philippines. Saturday, July 1, 2017 . One year after Philippines President Duterte's land slide election win the plight of more than 600,000 residents of Manila's slums in suburban Tondo is getting worse. Poverty, severe malnutrition and disease is an everyday reality for the residents living within the putrid area just a few kilometres from central Manila. The worst of the conditions can be found at Tondo's ?Happyland' BRGY105 where the population has grown from around 3500 in in 2006 to more than 12,000 today. Happyland is literally built around a dump, or many dumps were people daily wade through rubbish looking for anything of value. Tons of chicken scraps are collected from takeaways garbage bins; recycled by boiling the sold to hungry families the the slums for a few pesos. The stench, heat and storms create a toxic combination of disease, but inadequate government health services mean the people of Tondo's worst slum just get sicker and sicker. Alan Niewald, founder of Las Vegas based US non profit Kilos Bayanihan, says the problem at Tondo is magnified at Happyland and has become a multi-generational trap. ?Education is extremely important in the Philippines but most children do not attend school because the parents have to choose whether to feed their children or send them to school then possibly not have enough food to feed them. I's a tough decision!,O Niewald says. ?There is a lack of opportunity to improve their lives. There should be more livelihood or community training programs available. There is also the age restrictions that most employers have. This also makes it harder to find a job. Most of the homeless are usually from the province that come to Manila to try and find a better life but end up homeless.O Niewald admits: ?I don't see anything being done by Duterte to change anything.O On his first anniversary Duterte declared he wanted to give every Filipino ?comfortable life for allO. Duterte should try telling that to the forgotten people of Happyland who live a daily nightmare.//MCDONNELLTED_1426.221
EN_01266531_0008 SIP
Children walking through the wet corridors at Happyland slums. Manila, Philippines. Saturday, July 1, 2017 . One year after Philippines President Duterte's land slide election win the plight of more than 600,000 residents of Manila's slums in suburban Tondo is getting worse. Poverty, severe malnutrition and disease is an everyday reality for the residents living within the putrid area just a few kilometres from central Manila. The worst of the conditions can be found at Tondo's ?Happyland' BRGY105 where the population has grown from around 3500 in in 2006 to more than 12,000 today. Happyland is literally built around a dump, or many dumps were people daily wade through rubbish looking for anything of value. Tons of chicken scraps are collected from takeaways garbage bins; recycled by boiling the sold to hungry families the the slums for a few pesos. The stench, heat and storms create a toxic combination of disease, but inadequate government health services mean the people of Tondo's worst slum just get sicker and sicker. Alan Niewald, founder of Las Vegas based US non profit Kilos Bayanihan, says the problem at Tondo is magnified at Happyland and has become a multi-generational trap. ?Education is extremely important in the Philippines but most children do not attend school because the parents have to choose whether to feed their children or send them to school then possibly not have enough food to feed them. I's a tough decision!,O Niewald says. ?There is a lack of opportunity to improve their lives. There should be more livelihood or community training programs available. There is also the age restrictions that most employers have. This also makes it harder to find a job. Most of the homeless are usually from the province that come to Manila to try and find a better life but end up homeless.O Niewald admits: ?I don't see anything being done by Duterte to change anything.O On his first anniversary Duterte declared he wanted to give every Filipino ?comfortable life for allO. Duterte should try telling that to the forgotten people of Happyland who live a daily nightmare.//MCDONNELLTED_1426.189
EN_01266531_0023 SIP
Two girls walk through dirty water at Happyland slums. Many children in the slums are plagued by chronic illness due to the conditions Manila, Philippines. Saturday, July 1, 2017 . One year after Philippines President Duterte's land slide election win the plight of more than 600,000 residents of Manila's slums in suburban Tondo is getting worse. Poverty, severe malnutrition and disease is an everyday reality for the residents living within the putrid area just a few kilometres from central Manila. The worst of the conditions can be found at Tondo's ?Happyland' BRGY105 where the population has grown from around 3500 in in 2006 to more than 12,000 today. Happyland is literally built around a dump, or many dumps were people daily wade through rubbish looking for anything of value. Tons of chicken scraps are collected from takeaways garbage bins; recycled by boiling the sold to hungry families the the slums for a few pesos. The stench, heat and storms create a toxic combination of disease, but inadequate government health services mean the people of Tondo's worst slum just get sicker and sicker. Alan Niewald, founder of Las Vegas based US non profit Kilos Bayanihan, says the problem at Tondo is magnified at Happyland and has become a multi-generational trap. ?Education is extremely important in the Philippines but most children do not attend school because the parents have to choose whether to feed their children or send them to school then possibly not have enough food to feed them. I's a tough decision!,O Niewald says. ?There is a lack of opportunity to improve their lives. There should be more livelihood or community training programs available. There is also the age restrictions that most employers have. This also makes it harder to find a job. Most of the homeless are usually from the province that come to Manila to try and find a better life but end up homeless.O Niewald admits: ?I don't see anything being done by Duterte to change anything.O On his first anniversary Duterte declared he wanted to give every Filipino ?comfortable life for allO. Duterte should try telling that to the forgotten people of Happyland who live a daily nightmare.//MCDONNELLTED_1426.197
EN_01266531_0027 SIP
A young child tries to remove storm and sewage water from outside her tiny home at Happyland. Manila, Philippines. Saturday, July 1, 2017 . One year after Philippines President Duterte's land slide election win the plight of more than 600,000 residents of Manila's slums in suburban Tondo is getting worse. Poverty, severe malnutrition and disease is an everyday reality for the residents living within the putrid area just a few kilometres from central Manila. The worst of the conditions can be found at Tondo's ?Happyland' BRGY105 where the population has grown from around 3500 in in 2006 to more than 12,000 today. Happyland is literally built around a dump, or many dumps were people daily wade through rubbish looking for anything of value. Tons of chicken scraps are collected from takeaways garbage bins; recycled by boiling the sold to hungry families the the slums for a few pesos. The stench, heat and storms create a toxic combination of disease, but inadequate government health services mean the people of Tondo's worst slum just get sicker and sicker. Alan Niewald, founder of Las Vegas based US non profit Kilos Bayanihan, says the problem at Tondo is magnified at Happyland and has become a multi-generational trap. ?Education is extremely important in the Philippines but most children do not attend school because the parents have to choose whether to feed their children or send them to school then possibly not have enough food to feed them. I's a tough decision!,O Niewald says. ?There is a lack of opportunity to improve their lives. There should be more livelihood or community training programs available. There is also the age restrictions that most employers have. This also makes it harder to find a job. Most of the homeless are usually from the province that come to Manila to try and find a better life but end up homeless.O Niewald admits: ?I don't see anything being done by Duterte to change anything.O On his first anniversary Duterte declared he wanted to give every Filipino ?comfortable life for allO. Duterte should try telling that to the forgotten people of Happyland who live a daily nightmare.//MCDONNELLTED_1426.208
EN_01266531_0028 SIP
An undernourished child who is part of the feeding program run by US non profit Kilos Bayanihan at Happyland. Manila, Philippines. Saturday, July 1, 2017 . One year after Philippines President Duterte's land slide election win the plight of more than 600,000 residents of Manila's slums in suburban Tondo is getting worse. Poverty, severe malnutrition and disease is an everyday reality for the residents living within the putrid area just a few kilometres from central Manila. The worst of the conditions can be found at Tondo's ?Happyland' BRGY105 where the population has grown from around 3500 in in 2006 to more than 12,000 today. Happyland is literally built around a dump, or many dumps were people daily wade through rubbish looking for anything of value. Tons of chicken scraps are collected from takeaways garbage bins; recycled by boiling the sold to hungry families the the slums for a few pesos. The stench, heat and storms create a toxic combination of disease, but inadequate government health services mean the people of Tondo's worst slum just get sicker and sicker. Alan Niewald, founder of Las Vegas based US non profit Kilos Bayanihan, says the problem at Tondo is magnified at Happyland and has become a multi-generational trap. ?Education is extremely important in the Philippines but most children do not attend school because the parents have to choose whether to feed their children or send them to school then possibly not have enough food to feed them. I's a tough decision!,O Niewald says. ?There is a lack of opportunity to improve their lives. There should be more livelihood or community training programs available. There is also the age restrictions that most employers have. This also makes it harder to find a job. Most of the homeless are usually from the province that come to Manila to try and find a better life but end up homeless.O Niewald admits: ?I don't see anything being done by Duterte to change anything.O On his first anniversary Duterte declared he wanted to give every Filipino ?comfortable life for allO. Duterte should try telling that to the forgotten people of Happyland who live a daily nightmare.//MCDONNELLTED_1426.206
EN_01266531_0029 SIP
Mother and child wash their clothes at Happyland. Manila, Philippines. Saturday, July 1, 2017 . One year after Philippines President Duterte's land slide election win the plight of more than 600,000 residents of Manila's slums in suburban Tondo is getting worse. Poverty, severe malnutrition and disease is an everyday reality for the residents living within the putrid area just a few kilometres from central Manila. The worst of the conditions can be found at Tondo's ?Happyland' BRGY105 where the population has grown from around 3500 in in 2006 to more than 12,000 today. Happyland is literally built around a dump, or many dumps were people daily wade through rubbish looking for anything of value. Tons of chicken scraps are collected from takeaways garbage bins; recycled by boiling the sold to hungry families the the slums for a few pesos. The stench, heat and storms create a toxic combination of disease, but inadequate government health services mean the people of Tondo's worst slum just get sicker and sicker. Alan Niewald, founder of Las Vegas based US non profit Kilos Bayanihan, says the problem at Tondo is magnified at Happyland and has become a multi-generational trap. ?Education is extremely important in the Philippines but most children do not attend school because the parents have to choose whether to feed their children or send them to school then possibly not have enough food to feed them. I's a tough decision!,O Niewald says. ?There is a lack of opportunity to improve their lives. There should be more livelihood or community training programs available. There is also the age restrictions that most employers have. This also makes it harder to find a job. Most of the homeless are usually from the province that come to Manila to try and find a better life but end up homeless.O Niewald admits: ?I don't see anything being done by Duterte to change anything.O On his first anniversary Duterte declared he wanted to give every Filipino ?comfortable life for allO. Duterte should try telling that to the forgotten people of Happyland who live a daily nightmare.//MCDONNELLTED_1426.207
EN_01266531_0032 SIP
An undernourished child who is part of the feeding program run by US non profit Kilos Bayanihan at Happyland. Manila, Philippines. Saturday, July 1, 2017 . One year after Philippines President Duterte's land slide election win the plight of more than 600,000 residents of Manila's slums in suburban Tondo is getting worse. Poverty, severe malnutrition and disease is an everyday reality for the residents living within the putrid area just a few kilometres from central Manila. The worst of the conditions can be found at Tondo's ?Happyland' BRGY105 where the population has grown from around 3500 in in 2006 to more than 12,000 today. Happyland is literally built around a dump, or many dumps were people daily wade through rubbish looking for anything of value. Tons of chicken scraps are collected from takeaways garbage bins; recycled by boiling the sold to hungry families the the slums for a few pesos. The stench, heat and storms create a toxic combination of disease, but inadequate government health services mean the people of Tondo's worst slum just get sicker and sicker. Alan Niewald, founder of Las Vegas based US non profit Kilos Bayanihan, says the problem at Tondo is magnified at Happyland and has become a multi-generational trap. ?Education is extremely important in the Philippines but most children do not attend school because the parents have to choose whether to feed their children or send them to school then possibly not have enough food to feed them. I's a tough decision!,O Niewald says. ?There is a lack of opportunity to improve their lives. There should be more livelihood or community training programs available. There is also the age restrictions that most employers have. This also makes it harder to find a job. Most of the homeless are usually from the province that come to Manila to try and find a better life but end up homeless.O Niewald admits: ?I don't see anything being done by Duterte to change anything.O On his first anniversary Duterte declared he wanted to give every Filipino ?comfortable life for allO. Duterte should try telling that to the forgotten people of Happyland who live a daily nightmare.//MCDONNELLTED_1426.205
EN_01266531_0034 SIP
A child east as part of the feeding program run by US non profit Kilos Bayanihan at Happyland. Manila, Philippines. Saturday, July 1, 2017 . One year after Philippines President Duterte's land slide election win the plight of more than 600,000 residents of Manila's slums in suburban Tondo is getting worse. Poverty, severe malnutrition and disease is an everyday reality for the residents living within the putrid area just a few kilometres from central Manila. The worst of the conditions can be found at Tondo's ?Happyland' BRGY105 where the population has grown from around 3500 in in 2006 to more than 12,000 today. Happyland is literally built around a dump, or many dumps were people daily wade through rubbish looking for anything of value. Tons of chicken scraps are collected from takeaways garbage bins; recycled by boiling the sold to hungry families the the slums for a few pesos. The stench, heat and storms create a toxic combination of disease, but inadequate government health services mean the people of Tondo's worst slum just get sicker and sicker. Alan Niewald, founder of Las Vegas based US non profit Kilos Bayanihan, says the problem at Tondo is magnified at Happyland and has become a multi-generational trap. ?Education is extremely important in the Philippines but most children do not attend school because the parents have to choose whether to feed their children or send them to school then possibly not have enough food to feed them. I's a tough decision!,O Niewald says. ?There is a lack of opportunity to improve their lives. There should be more livelihood or community training programs available. There is also the age restrictions that most employers have. This also makes it harder to find a job. Most of the homeless are usually from the province that come to Manila to try and find a better life but end up homeless.O Niewald admits: ?I don't see anything being done by Duterte to change anything.O On his first anniversary Duterte declared he wanted to give every Filipino ?comfortable life for allO. Duterte should try telling that to the forgotten people of Happyland who live a daily nightmare.//MCDONNELLTED_1426.201
EN_01266531_0035 SIP
US non profit Kilos Bayanihan volunteer Arlene Silao feeds an under nourished child at Happyland. Manila, Philippines. Saturday, July 1, 2017 . One year after Philippines President Duterte's land slide election win the plight of more than 600,000 residents of Manila's slums in suburban Tondo is getting worse. Poverty, severe malnutrition and disease is an everyday reality for the residents living within the putrid area just a few kilometres from central Manila. The worst of the conditions can be found at Tondo's ?Happyland' BRGY105 where the population has grown from around 3500 in in 2006 to more than 12,000 today. Happyland is literally built around a dump, or many dumps were people daily wade through rubbish looking for anything of value. Tons of chicken scraps are collected from takeaways garbage bins; recycled by boiling the sold to hungry families the the slums for a few pesos. The stench, heat and storms create a toxic combination of disease, but inadequate government health services mean the people of Tondo's worst slum just get sicker and sicker. Alan Niewald, founder of Las Vegas based US non profit Kilos Bayanihan, says the problem at Tondo is magnified at Happyland and has become a multi-generational trap. ?Education is extremely important in the Philippines but most children do not attend school because the parents have to choose whether to feed their children or send them to school then possibly not have enough food to feed them. I's a tough decision!,O Niewald says. ?There is a lack of opportunity to improve their lives. There should be more livelihood or community training programs available. There is also the age restrictions that most employers have. This also makes it harder to find a job. Most of the homeless are usually from the province that come to Manila to try and find a better life but end up homeless.O Niewald admits: ?I don't see anything being done by Duterte to change anything.O On his first anniversary Duterte declared he wanted to give every Filipino ?comfortable life for allO. Duterte should try telling that to the forgotten people of Happyland who live a daily nightmare.//MCDONNELLTED_1426.200
EN_01266531_0036 SIP
As part of US non profit Kilos Bayanihan feeding program children are taught to wash their hands at Happyland. Manila, Philippines. Saturday, July 1, 2017 . One year after Philippines President Duterte's land slide election win the plight of more than 600,000 residents of Manila's slums in suburban Tondo is getting worse. Poverty, severe malnutrition and disease is an everyday reality for the residents living within the putrid area just a few kilometres from central Manila. The worst of the conditions can be found at Tondo's ?Happyland' BRGY105 where the population has grown from around 3500 in in 2006 to more than 12,000 today. Happyland is literally built around a dump, or many dumps were people daily wade through rubbish looking for anything of value. Tons of chicken scraps are collected from takeaways garbage bins; recycled by boiling the sold to hungry families the the slums for a few pesos. The stench, heat and storms create a toxic combination of disease, but inadequate government health services mean the people of Tondo's worst slum just get sicker and sicker. Alan Niewald, founder of Las Vegas based US non profit Kilos Bayanihan, says the problem at Tondo is magnified at Happyland and has become a multi-generational trap. ?Education is extremely important in the Philippines but most children do not attend school because the parents have to choose whether to feed their children or send them to school then possibly not have enough food to feed them. I's a tough decision!,O Niewald says. ?There is a lack of opportunity to improve their lives. There should be more livelihood or community training programs available. There is also the age restrictions that most employers have. This also makes it harder to find a job. Most of the homeless are usually from the province that come to Manila to try and find a better life but end up homeless.O Niewald admits: ?I don't see anything being done by Duterte to change anything.O On his first anniversary Duterte declared he wanted to give every Filipino ?comfortable life for allO. Duterte should try telling that to the forgotten people of Happyland who live a daily nightmare.//MCDONNELLTED_1426.199
EN_01266531_0037 SIP
A child on her bike outside her home at Happyland slums. Manila, Philippines. Saturday, July 1, 2017 . One year after Philippines President Duterte's land slide election win the plight of more than 600,000 residents of Manila's slums in suburban Tondo is getting worse. Poverty, severe malnutrition and disease is an everyday reality for the residents living within the putrid area just a few kilometres from central Manila. The worst of the conditions can be found at Tondo's ?Happyland' BRGY105 where the population has grown from around 3500 in in 2006 to more than 12,000 today. Happyland is literally built around a dump, or many dumps were people daily wade through rubbish looking for anything of value. Tons of chicken scraps are collected from takeaways garbage bins; recycled by boiling the sold to hungry families the the slums for a few pesos. The stench, heat and storms create a toxic combination of disease, but inadequate government health services mean the people of Tondo's worst slum just get sicker and sicker. Alan Niewald, founder of Las Vegas based US non profit Kilos Bayanihan, says the problem at Tondo is magnified at Happyland and has become a multi-generational trap. ?Education is extremely important in the Philippines but most children do not attend school because the parents have to choose whether to feed their children or send them to school then possibly not have enough food to feed them. I's a tough decision!,O Niewald says. ?There is a lack of opportunity to improve their lives. There should be more livelihood or community training programs available. There is also the age restrictions that most employers have. This also makes it harder to find a job. Most of the homeless are usually from the province that come to Manila to try and find a better life but end up homeless.O Niewald admits: ?I don't see anything being done by Duterte to change anything.O On his first anniversary Duterte declared he wanted to give every Filipino ?comfortable life for allO. Duterte should try telling that to the forgotten people of Happyland who live a daily nightmare.//MCDONNELLTED_1426.198
EN_01266531_0038 SIP
Children play at one of the tiny homes at Happyland slums. Manila, Philippines. Saturday, July 1, 2017 . One year after Philippines President Duterte's land slide election win the plight of more than 600,000 residents of Manila's slums in suburban Tondo is getting worse. Poverty, severe malnutrition and disease is an everyday reality for the residents living within the putrid area just a few kilometres from central Manila. The worst of the conditions can be found at Tondo's ?Happyland' BRGY105 where the population has grown from around 3500 in in 2006 to more than 12,000 today. Happyland is literally built around a dump, or many dumps were people daily wade through rubbish looking for anything of value. Tons of chicken scraps are collected from takeaways garbage bins; recycled by boiling the sold to hungry families the the slums for a few pesos. The stench, heat and storms create a toxic combination of disease, but inadequate government health services mean the people of Tondo's worst slum just get sicker and sicker. Alan Niewald, founder of Las Vegas based US non profit Kilos Bayanihan, says the problem at Tondo is magnified at Happyland and has become a multi-generational trap. ?Education is extremely important in the Philippines but most children do not attend school because the parents have to choose whether to feed their children or send them to school then possibly not have enough food to feed them. I's a tough decision!,O Niewald says. ?There is a lack of opportunity to improve their lives. There should be more livelihood or community training programs available. There is also the age restrictions that most employers have. This also makes it harder to find a job. Most of the homeless are usually from the province that come to Manila to try and find a better life but end up homeless.O Niewald admits: ?I don't see anything being done by Duterte to change anything.O On his first anniversary Duterte declared he wanted to give every Filipino ?comfortable life for allO. Duterte should try telling that to the forgotten people of Happyland who live a daily nightmare.//MCDONNELLTED_1426.196
EN_01266531_0039 SIP
A women in her home at Happyland slums peels garlic in the hope of making a few pesos. Manila, Philippines. Saturday, July 1, 2017 . One year after Philippines President Duterte's land slide election win the plight of more than 600,000 residents of Manila's slums in suburban Tondo is getting worse. Poverty, severe malnutrition and disease is an everyday reality for the residents living within the putrid area just a few kilometres from central Manila. The worst of the conditions can be found at Tondo's ?Happyland' BRGY105 where the population has grown from around 3500 in in 2006 to more than 12,000 today. Happyland is literally built around a dump, or many dumps were people daily wade through rubbish looking for anything of value. Tons of chicken scraps are collected from takeaways garbage bins; recycled by boiling the sold to hungry families the the slums for a few pesos. The stench, heat and storms create a toxic combination of disease, but inadequate government health services mean the people of Tondo's worst slum just get sicker and sicker. Alan Niewald, founder of Las Vegas based US non profit Kilos Bayanihan, says the problem at Tondo is magnified at Happyland and has become a multi-generational trap. ?Education is extremely important in the Philippines but most children do not attend school because the parents have to choose whether to feed their children or send them to school then possibly not have enough food to feed them. I's a tough decision!,O Niewald says. ?There is a lack of opportunity to improve their lives. There should be more livelihood or community training programs available. There is also the age restrictions that most employers have. This also makes it harder to find a job. Most of the homeless are usually from the province that come to Manila to try and find a better life but end up homeless.O Niewald admits: ?I don't see anything being done by Duterte to change anything.O On his first anniversary Duterte declared he wanted to give every Filipino ?comfortable life for allO. Duterte should try telling that to the forgotten people of Happyland who live a daily nightmare.//MCDONNELLTED_1426.195
EN_01266531_0040 SIP
A young boy making his way through the corridors at Happyland slums. Manila, Philippines. Saturday, July 1, 2017 . One year after Philippines President Duterte's land slide election win the plight of more than 600,000 residents of Manila's slums in suburban Tondo is getting worse. Poverty, severe malnutrition and disease is an everyday reality for the residents living within the putrid area just a few kilometres from central Manila. The worst of the conditions can be found at Tondo's ?Happyland' BRGY105 where the population has grown from around 3500 in in 2006 to more than 12,000 today. Happyland is literally built around a dump, or many dumps were people daily wade through rubbish looking for anything of value. Tons of chicken scraps are collected from takeaways garbage bins; recycled by boiling the sold to hungry families the the slums for a few pesos. The stench, heat and storms create a toxic combination of disease, but inadequate government health services mean the people of Tondo's worst slum just get sicker and sicker. Alan Niewald, founder of Las Vegas based US non profit Kilos Bayanihan, says the problem at Tondo is magnified at Happyland and has become a multi-generational trap. ?Education is extremely important in the Philippines but most children do not attend school because the parents have to choose whether to feed their children or send them to school then possibly not have enough food to feed them. I's a tough decision!,O Niewald says. ?There is a lack of opportunity to improve their lives. There should be more livelihood or community training programs available. There is also the age restrictions that most employers have. This also makes it harder to find a job. Most of the homeless are usually from the province that come to Manila to try and find a better life but end up homeless.O Niewald admits: ?I don't see anything being done by Duterte to change anything.O On his first anniversary Duterte declared he wanted to give every Filipino ?comfortable life for allO. Duterte should try telling that to the forgotten people of Happyland who live a daily nightmare.//MCDONNELLTED_1426.194
EN_01266531_0042 SIP
Children in their home at at Happyland slums. Manila, Philippines. Saturday, July 1, 2017 . One year after Philippines President Duterte's land slide election win the plight of more than 600,000 residents of Manila's slums in suburban Tondo is getting worse. Poverty, severe malnutrition and disease is an everyday reality for the residents living within the putrid area just a few kilometres from central Manila. The worst of the conditions can be found at Tondo's ?Happyland' BRGY105 where the population has grown from around 3500 in in 2006 to more than 12,000 today. Happyland is literally built around a dump, or many dumps were people daily wade through rubbish looking for anything of value. Tons of chicken scraps are collected from takeaways garbage bins; recycled by boiling the sold to hungry families the the slums for a few pesos. The stench, heat and storms create a toxic combination of disease, but inadequate government health services mean the people of Tondo's worst slum just get sicker and sicker. Alan Niewald, founder of Las Vegas based US non profit Kilos Bayanihan, says the problem at Tondo is magnified at Happyland and has become a multi-generational trap. ?Education is extremely important in the Philippines but most children do not attend school because the parents have to choose whether to feed their children or send them to school then possibly not have enough food to feed them. I's a tough decision!,O Niewald says. ?There is a lack of opportunity to improve their lives. There should be more livelihood or community training programs available. There is also the age restrictions that most employers have. This also makes it harder to find a job. Most of the homeless are usually from the province that come to Manila to try and find a better life but end up homeless.O Niewald admits: ?I don't see anything being done by Duterte to change anything.O On his first anniversary Duterte declared he wanted to give every Filipino ?comfortable life for allO. Duterte should try telling that to the forgotten people of Happyland who live a daily nightmare.//MCDONNELLTED_1426.193
EN_01266531_0043 SIP
A typical seen at at Happyland slums. Manila, Philippines. Saturday, July 1, 2017 . One year after Philippines President Duterte's land slide election win the plight of more than 600,000 residents of Manila's slums in suburban Tondo is getting worse. Poverty, severe malnutrition and disease is an everyday reality for the residents living within the putrid area just a few kilometres from central Manila. The worst of the conditions can be found at Tondo's ?Happyland' BRGY105 where the population has grown from around 3500 in in 2006 to more than 12,000 today. Happyland is literally built around a dump, or many dumps were people daily wade through rubbish looking for anything of value. Tons of chicken scraps are collected from takeaways garbage bins; recycled by boiling the sold to hungry families the the slums for a few pesos. The stench, heat and storms create a toxic combination of disease, but inadequate government health services mean the people of Tondo's worst slum just get sicker and sicker. Alan Niewald, founder of Las Vegas based US non profit Kilos Bayanihan, says the problem at Tondo is magnified at Happyland and has become a multi-generational trap. ?Education is extremely important in the Philippines but most children do not attend school because the parents have to choose whether to feed their children or send them to school then possibly not have enough food to feed them. I's a tough decision!,O Niewald says. ?There is a lack of opportunity to improve their lives. There should be more livelihood or community training programs available. There is also the age restrictions that most employers have. This also makes it harder to find a job. Most of the homeless are usually from the province that come to Manila to try and find a better life but end up homeless.O Niewald admits: ?I don't see anything being done by Duterte to change anything.O On his first anniversary Duterte declared he wanted to give every Filipino ?comfortable life for allO. Duterte should try telling that to the forgotten people of Happyland who live a daily nightmare.//MCDONNELLTED_1426.192
EN_01266531_0044 SIP
A child and her father cooling off in their small home at at Happyland slums. Manila, Philippines. Saturday, July 1, 2017 . One year after Philippines President Duterte's land slide election win the plight of more than 600,000 residents of Manila's slums in suburban Tondo is getting worse. Poverty, severe malnutrition and disease is an everyday reality for the residents living within the putrid area just a few kilometres from central Manila. The worst of the conditions can be found at Tondo's ?Happyland' BRGY105 where the population has grown from around 3500 in in 2006 to more than 12,000 today. Happyland is literally built around a dump, or many dumps were people daily wade through rubbish looking for anything of value. Tons of chicken scraps are collected from takeaways garbage bins; recycled by boiling the sold to hungry families the the slums for a few pesos. The stench, heat and storms create a toxic combination of disease, but inadequate government health services mean the people of Tondo's worst slum just get sicker and sicker. Alan Niewald, founder of Las Vegas based US non profit Kilos Bayanihan, says the problem at Tondo is magnified at Happyland and has become a multi-generational trap. ?Education is extremely important in the Philippines but most children do not attend school because the parents have to choose whether to feed their children or send them to school then possibly not have enough food to feed them. I's a tough decision!,O Niewald says. ?There is a lack of opportunity to improve their lives. There should be more livelihood or community training programs available. There is also the age restrictions that most employers have. This also makes it harder to find a job. Most of the homeless are usually from the province that come to Manila to try and find a better life but end up homeless.O Niewald admits: ?I don't see anything being done by Duterte to change anything.O On his first anniversary Duterte declared he wanted to give every Filipino ?comfortable life for allO. Duterte should try telling that to the forgotten people of Happyland who live a daily nightmare.//MCDONNELLTED_1426.191
EN_01266531_0045 SIP
A child looks out of her tiny home at Happyland slums. Manila, Philippines. Saturday, July 1, 2017 . One year after Philippines President Duterte's land slide election win the plight of more than 600,000 residents of Manila's slums in suburban Tondo is getting worse. Poverty, severe malnutrition and disease is an everyday reality for the residents living within the putrid area just a few kilometres from central Manila. The worst of the conditions can be found at Tondo's ?Happyland' BRGY105 where the population has grown from around 3500 in in 2006 to more than 12,000 today. Happyland is literally built around a dump, or many dumps were people daily wade through rubbish looking for anything of value. Tons of chicken scraps are collected from takeaways garbage bins; recycled by boiling the sold to hungry families the the slums for a few pesos. The stench, heat and storms create a toxic combination of disease, but inadequate government health services mean the people of Tondo's worst slum just get sicker and sicker. Alan Niewald, founder of Las Vegas based US non profit Kilos Bayanihan, says the problem at Tondo is magnified at Happyland and has become a multi-generational trap. ?Education is extremely important in the Philippines but most children do not attend school because the parents have to choose whether to feed their children or send them to school then possibly not have enough food to feed them. I's a tough decision!,O Niewald says. ?There is a lack of opportunity to improve their lives. There should be more livelihood or community training programs available. There is also the age restrictions that most employers have. This also makes it harder to find a job. Most of the homeless are usually from the province that come to Manila to try and find a better life but end up homeless.O Niewald admits: ?I don't see anything being done by Duterte to change anything.O On his first anniversary Duterte declared he wanted to give every Filipino ?comfortable life for allO. Duterte should try telling that to the forgotten people of Happyland who live a daily nightmare.//MCDONNELLTED_1426.190
EN_01266531_0046 SIP
A young girl comes out of her home at at Happyland slums. Manila, Philippines. Saturday, July 1, 2017 . One year after Philippines President Duterte's land slide election win the plight of more than 600,000 residents of Manila's slums in suburban Tondo is getting worse. Poverty, severe malnutrition and disease is an everyday reality for the residents living within the putrid area just a few kilometres from central Manila. The worst of the conditions can be found at Tondo's ?Happyland' BRGY105 where the population has grown from around 3500 in in 2006 to more than 12,000 today. Happyland is literally built around a dump, or many dumps were people daily wade through rubbish looking for anything of value. Tons of chicken scraps are collected from takeaways garbage bins; recycled by boiling the sold to hungry families the the slums for a few pesos. The stench, heat and storms create a toxic combination of disease, but inadequate government health services mean the people of Tondo's worst slum just get sicker and sicker. Alan Niewald, founder of Las Vegas based US non profit Kilos Bayanihan, says the problem at Tondo is magnified at Happyland and has become a multi-generational trap. ?Education is extremely important in the Philippines but most children do not attend school because the parents have to choose whether to feed their children or send them to school then possibly not have enough food to feed them. I's a tough decision!,O Niewald says. ?There is a lack of opportunity to improve their lives. There should be more livelihood or community training programs available. There is also the age restrictions that most employers have. This also makes it harder to find a job. Most of the homeless are usually from the province that come to Manila to try and find a better life but end up homeless.O Niewald admits: ?I don't see anything being done by Duterte to change anything.O On his first anniversary Duterte declared he wanted to give every Filipino ?comfortable life for allO. Duterte should try telling that to the forgotten people of Happyland who live a daily nightmare.//MCDONNELLTED_1426.188
EN_01266531_0047 SIP
People walking along the storm flooded corridors at at Happyland slums. Manila, Philippines. Saturday, July 1, 2017 . One year after Philippines President Duterte's land slide election win the plight of more than 600,000 residents of Manila's slums in suburban Tondo is getting worse. Poverty, severe malnutrition and disease is an everyday reality for the residents living within the putrid area just a few kilometres from central Manila. The worst of the conditions can be found at Tondo's ?Happyland' BRGY105 where the population has grown from around 3500 in in 2006 to more than 12,000 today. Happyland is literally built around a dump, or many dumps were people daily wade through rubbish looking for anything of value. Tons of chicken scraps are collected from takeaways garbage bins; recycled by boiling the sold to hungry families the the slums for a few pesos. The stench, heat and storms create a toxic combination of disease, but inadequate government health services mean the people of Tondo's worst slum just get sicker and sicker. Alan Niewald, founder of Las Vegas based US non profit Kilos Bayanihan, says the problem at Tondo is magnified at Happyland and has become a multi-generational trap. ?Education is extremely important in the Philippines but most children do not attend school because the parents have to choose whether to feed their children or send them to school then possibly not have enough food to feed them. I's a tough decision!,O Niewald says. ?There is a lack of opportunity to improve their lives. There should be more livelihood or community training programs available. There is also the age restrictions that most employers have. This also makes it harder to find a job. Most of the homeless are usually from the province that come to Manila to try and find a better life but end up homeless.O Niewald admits: ?I don't see anything being done by Duterte to change anything.O On his first anniversary Duterte declared he wanted to give every Filipino ?comfortable life for allO. Duterte should try telling that to the forgotten people of Happyland who live a daily nightmare.//MCDONNELLTED_1426.186
EN_01266531_0049 SIP
Men playing on antiquated computers at Happyland slums. Manila, Philippines. Saturday, July 1, 2017 . One year after Philippines President Duterte's land slide election win the plight of more than 600,000 residents of Manila's slums in suburban Tondo is getting worse. Poverty, severe malnutrition and disease is an everyday reality for the residents living within the putrid area just a few kilometres from central Manila. The worst of the conditions can be found at Tondo's ?Happyland' BRGY105 where the population has grown from around 3500 in in 2006 to more than 12,000 today. Happyland is literally built around a dump, or many dumps were people daily wade through rubbish looking for anything of value. Tons of chicken scraps are collected from takeaways garbage bins; recycled by boiling the sold to hungry families the the slums for a few pesos. The stench, heat and storms create a toxic combination of disease, but inadequate government health services mean the people of Tondo's worst slum just get sicker and sicker. Alan Niewald, founder of Las Vegas based US non profit Kilos Bayanihan, says the problem at Tondo is magnified at Happyland and has become a multi-generational trap. ?Education is extremely important in the Philippines but most children do not attend school because the parents have to choose whether to feed their children or send them to school then possibly not have enough food to feed them. I's a tough decision!,O Niewald says. ?There is a lack of opportunity to improve their lives. There should be more livelihood or community training programs available. There is also the age restrictions that most employers have. This also makes it harder to find a job. Most of the homeless are usually from the province that come to Manila to try and find a better life but end up homeless.O Niewald admits: ?I don't see anything being done by Duterte to change anything.O On his first anniversary Duterte declared he wanted to give every Filipino ?comfortable life for allO. Duterte should try telling that to the forgotten people of Happyland who live a daily nightmare.//MCDONNELLTED_1426.185
EN_01266531_0069 SIP
A young girl showers in the storm in a corridor at Happyland as her brothers pass by. Manila, Philippines. Saturday, July 1, 2017 . One year after Philippines President Duterte's land slide election win the plight of more than 600,000 residents of Manila's slums in suburban Tondo is getting worse. Poverty, severe malnutrition and disease is an everyday reality for the residents living within the putrid area just a few kilometres from central Manila. The worst of the conditions can be found at Tondo's ?Happyland' BRGY105 where the population has grown from around 3500 in in 2006 to more than 12,000 today. Happyland is literally built around a dump, or many dumps were people daily wade through rubbish looking for anything of value. Tons of chicken scraps are collected from takeaways garbage bins; recycled by boiling the sold to hungry families the the slums for a few pesos. The stench, heat and storms create a toxic combination of disease, but inadequate government health services mean the people of Tondo's worst slum just get sicker and sicker. Alan Niewald, founder of Las Vegas based US non profit Kilos Bayanihan, says the problem at Tondo is magnified at Happyland and has become a multi-generational trap. ?Education is extremely important in the Philippines but most children do not attend school because the parents have to choose whether to feed their children or send them to school then possibly not have enough food to feed them. I's a tough decision!,O Niewald says. ?There is a lack of opportunity to improve their lives. There should be more livelihood or community training programs available. There is also the age restrictions that most employers have. This also makes it harder to find a job. Most of the homeless are usually from the province that come to Manila to try and find a better life but end up homeless.O Niewald admits: ?I don't see anything being done by Duterte to change anything.O On his first anniversary Duterte declared he wanted to give every Filipino ?comfortable life for allO. Duterte should try telling that to the forgotten people of Happyland who live a daily nightmare.//MCDONNELLTED_1426.204
EN_01266531_0070 SIP
A young child showers in the storm in a corridor at Happyland. Manila, Philippines. Saturday, July 1, 2017 . One year after Philippines President Duterte's land slide election win the plight of more than 600,000 residents of Manila's slums in suburban Tondo is getting worse. Poverty, severe malnutrition and disease is an everyday reality for the residents living within the putrid area just a few kilometres from central Manila. The worst of the conditions can be found at Tondo's ?Happyland' BRGY105 where the population has grown from around 3500 in in 2006 to more than 12,000 today. Happyland is literally built around a dump, or many dumps were people daily wade through rubbish looking for anything of value. Tons of chicken scraps are collected from takeaways garbage bins; recycled by boiling the sold to hungry families the the slums for a few pesos. The stench, heat and storms create a toxic combination of disease, but inadequate government health services mean the people of Tondo's worst slum just get sicker and sicker. Alan Niewald, founder of Las Vegas based US non profit Kilos Bayanihan, says the problem at Tondo is magnified at Happyland and has become a multi-generational trap. ?Education is extremely important in the Philippines but most children do not attend school because the parents have to choose whether to feed their children or send them to school then possibly not have enough food to feed them. I's a tough decision!,O Niewald says. ?There is a lack of opportunity to improve their lives. There should be more livelihood or community training programs available. There is also the age restrictions that most employers have. This also makes it harder to find a job. Most of the homeless are usually from the province that come to Manila to try and find a better life but end up homeless.O Niewald admits: ?I don't see anything being done by Duterte to change anything.O On his first anniversary Duterte declared he wanted to give every Filipino ?comfortable life for allO. Duterte should try telling that to the forgotten people of Happyland who live a daily nightmare.//MCDONNELLTED_1426.203
EN_01266531_0071 SIP
A young girl walking through a storm ridden corridor US non profit Kilos Bayanihan. Manila, Philippines. Saturday, July 1, 2017 . One year after Philippines President Duterte's land slide election win the plight of more than 600,000 residents of Manila's slums in suburban Tondo is getting worse. Poverty, severe malnutrition and disease is an everyday reality for the residents living within the putrid area just a few kilometres from central Manila. The worst of the conditions can be found at Tondo's ?Happyland' BRGY105 where the population has grown from around 3500 in in 2006 to more than 12,000 today. Happyland is literally built around a dump, or many dumps were people daily wade through rubbish looking for anything of value. Tons of chicken scraps are collected from takeaways garbage bins; recycled by boiling the sold to hungry families the the slums for a few pesos. The stench, heat and storms create a toxic combination of disease, but inadequate government health services mean the people of Tondo's worst slum just get sicker and sicker. Alan Niewald, founder of Las Vegas based US non profit Kilos Bayanihan, says the problem at Tondo is magnified at Happyland and has become a multi-generational trap. ?Education is extremely important in the Philippines but most children do not attend school because the parents have to choose whether to feed their children or send them to school then possibly not have enough food to feed them. I's a tough decision!,O Niewald says. ?There is a lack of opportunity to improve their lives. There should be more livelihood or community training programs available. There is also the age restrictions that most employers have. This also makes it harder to find a job. Most of the homeless are usually from the province that come to Manila to try and find a better life but end up homeless.O Niewald admits: ?I don't see anything being done by Duterte to change anything.O On his first anniversary Duterte declared he wanted to give every Filipino ?comfortable life for allO. Duterte should try telling that to the forgotten people of Happyland who live a daily nightmare.//MCDONNELLTED_1426.202
EN_01266531_0072 SIP
Youths play basketball at Happyland slums. Manila, Philippines. Saturday, July 1, 2017 . One year after Philippines President Duterte's land slide election win the plight of more than 600,000 residents of Manila's slums in suburban Tondo is getting worse. Poverty, severe malnutrition and disease is an everyday reality for the residents living within the putrid area just a few kilometres from central Manila. The worst of the conditions can be found at Tondo's ?Happyland' BRGY105 where the population has grown from around 3500 in in 2006 to more than 12,000 today. Happyland is literally built around a dump, or many dumps were people daily wade through rubbish looking for anything of value. Tons of chicken scraps are collected from takeaways garbage bins; recycled by boiling the sold to hungry families the the slums for a few pesos. The stench, heat and storms create a toxic combination of disease, but inadequate government health services mean the people of Tondo's worst slum just get sicker and sicker. Alan Niewald, founder of Las Vegas based US non profit Kilos Bayanihan, says the problem at Tondo is magnified at Happyland and has become a multi-generational trap. ?Education is extremely important in the Philippines but most children do not attend school because the parents have to choose whether to feed their children or send them to school then possibly not have enough food to feed them. I's a tough decision!,O Niewald says. ?There is a lack of opportunity to improve their lives. There should be more livelihood or community training programs available. There is also the age restrictions that most employers have. This also makes it harder to find a job. Most of the homeless are usually from the province that come to Manila to try and find a better life but end up homeless.O Niewald admits: ?I don't see anything being done by Duterte to change anything.O On his first anniversary Duterte declared he wanted to give every Filipino ?comfortable life for allO. Duterte should try telling that to the forgotten people of Happyland who live a daily nightmare.//MCDONNELLTED_1426.184
EN_01266531_0075 SIP
A young girl at Happyland slums. Manila, Philippines. Saturday, July 1, 2017 . One year after Philippines President Duterte's land slide election win the plight of more than 600,000 residents of Manila's slums in suburban Tondo is getting worse. Poverty, severe malnutrition and disease is an everyday reality for the residents living within the putrid area just a few kilometres from central Manila. The worst of the conditions can be found at Tondo's ?Happyland' BRGY105 where the population has grown from around 3500 in in 2006 to more than 12,000 today. Happyland is literally built around a dump, or many dumps were people daily wade through rubbish looking for anything of value. Tons of chicken scraps are collected from takeaways garbage bins; recycled by boiling the sold to hungry families the the slums for a few pesos. The stench, heat and storms create a toxic combination of disease, but inadequate government health services mean the people of Tondo's worst slum just get sicker and sicker. Alan Niewald, founder of Las Vegas based US non profit Kilos Bayanihan, says the problem at Tondo is magnified at Happyland and has become a multi-generational trap. ?Education is extremely important in the Philippines but most children do not attend school because the parents have to choose whether to feed their children or send them to school then possibly not have enough food to feed them. I's a tough decision!,O Niewald says. ?There is a lack of opportunity to improve their lives. There should be more livelihood or community training programs available. There is also the age restrictions that most employers have. This also makes it harder to find a job. Most of the homeless are usually from the province that come to Manila to try and find a better life but end up homeless.O Niewald admits: ?I don't see anything being done by Duterte to change anything.O On his first anniversary Duterte declared he wanted to give every Filipino ?comfortable life for allO. Duterte should try telling that to the forgotten people of Happyland who live a daily nightmare.//MCDONNELLTED_1426.187
EN_01266531_0001 SIP
A young girl tries to blow up a balloon at the Happyland slums. Manila, Philippines. Saturday, July 1, 2017 . One year after Philippines President Duterte's land slide election win the plight of more than 600,000 residents of Manila's slums in suburban Tondo is getting worse. Poverty, severe malnutrition and disease is an everyday reality for the residents living within the putrid area just a few kilometres from central Manila. The worst of the conditions can be found at Tondo's ?Happyland' BRGY105 where the population has grown from around 3500 in in 2006 to more than 12,000 today. Happyland is literally built around a dump, or many dumps were people daily wade through rubbish looking for anything of value. Tons of chicken scraps are collected from takeaways garbage bins; recycled by boiling the sold to hungry families the the slums for a few pesos. The stench, heat and storms create a toxic combination of disease, but inadequate government health services mean the people of Tondo's worst slum just get sicker and sicker. Alan Niewald, founder of Las Vegas based US non profit Kilos Bayanihan, says the problem at Tondo is magnified at Happyland and has become a multi-generational trap. ?Education is extremely important in the Philippines but most children do not attend school because the parents have to choose whether to feed their children or send them to school then possibly not have enough food to feed them. I's a tough decision!,O Niewald says. ?There is a lack of opportunity to improve their lives. There should be more livelihood or community training programs available. There is also the age restrictions that most employers have. This also makes it harder to find a job. Most of the homeless are usually from the province that come to Manila to try and find a better life but end up homeless.O Niewald admits: ?I don't see anything being done by Duterte to change anything.O On his first anniversary Duterte declared he wanted to give every Filipino ?comfortable life for allO. Duterte should try telling that to the forgotten people of Happyland who live a daily nightmare.//MCDONNELLTED_1426.166
EN_01266531_0002 SIP
Children play at the Happyland slums. Manila, Philippines. Saturday, July 1, 2017 . One year after Philippines President Duterte's land slide election win the plight of more than 600,000 residents of Manila's slums in suburban Tondo is getting worse. Poverty, severe malnutrition and disease is an everyday reality for the residents living within the putrid area just a few kilometres from central Manila. The worst of the conditions can be found at Tondo's ?Happyland' BRGY105 where the population has grown from around 3500 in in 2006 to more than 12,000 today. Happyland is literally built around a dump, or many dumps were people daily wade through rubbish looking for anything of value. Tons of chicken scraps are collected from takeaways garbage bins; recycled by boiling the sold to hungry families the the slums for a few pesos. The stench, heat and storms create a toxic combination of disease, but inadequate government health services mean the people of Tondo's worst slum just get sicker and sicker. Alan Niewald, founder of Las Vegas based US non profit Kilos Bayanihan, says the problem at Tondo is magnified at Happyland and has become a multi-generational trap. ?Education is extremely important in the Philippines but most children do not attend school because the parents have to choose whether to feed their children or send them to school then possibly not have enough food to feed them. I's a tough decision!,O Niewald says. ?There is a lack of opportunity to improve their lives. There should be more livelihood or community training programs available. There is also the age restrictions that most employers have. This also makes it harder to find a job. Most of the homeless are usually from the province that come to Manila to try and find a better life but end up homeless.O Niewald admits: ?I don't see anything being done by Duterte to change anything.O On his first anniversary Duterte declared he wanted to give every Filipino ?comfortable life for allO. Duterte should try telling that to the forgotten people of Happyland who live a daily nightmare.//MCDONNELLTED_1426.165
EN_01266531_0003 SIP
A young child alone at the Happyland slums. Manila, Philippines. Saturday, July 1, 2017 . One year after Philippines President Duterte's land slide election win the plight of more than 600,000 residents of Manila's slums in suburban Tondo is getting worse. Poverty, severe malnutrition and disease is an everyday reality for the residents living within the putrid area just a few kilometres from central Manila. The worst of the conditions can be found at Tondo's ?Happyland' BRGY105 where the population has grown from around 3500 in in 2006 to more than 12,000 today. Happyland is literally built around a dump, or many dumps were people daily wade through rubbish looking for anything of value. Tons of chicken scraps are collected from takeaways garbage bins; recycled by boiling the sold to hungry families the the slums for a few pesos. The stench, heat and storms create a toxic combination of disease, but inadequate government health services mean the people of Tondo's worst slum just get sicker and sicker. Alan Niewald, founder of Las Vegas based US non profit Kilos Bayanihan, says the problem at Tondo is magnified at Happyland and has become a multi-generational trap. ?Education is extremely important in the Philippines but most children do not attend school because the parents have to choose whether to feed their children or send them to school then possibly not have enough food to feed them. I's a tough decision!,O Niewald says. ?There is a lack of opportunity to improve their lives. There should be more livelihood or community training programs available. There is also the age restrictions that most employers have. This also makes it harder to find a job. Most of the homeless are usually from the province that come to Manila to try and find a better life but end up homeless.O Niewald admits: ?I don't see anything being done by Duterte to change anything.O On his first anniversary Duterte declared he wanted to give every Filipino ?comfortable life for allO. Duterte should try telling that to the forgotten people of Happyland who live a daily nightmare.//MCDONNELLTED_1426.164
EN_01266531_0004 SIP
A husband watches his wife play on an antiquated computer machine at Happyland. Manila, Philippines. Saturday, July 1, 2017 . One year after Philippines President Duterte's land slide election win the plight of more than 600,000 residents of Manila's slums in suburban Tondo is getting worse. Poverty, severe malnutrition and disease is an everyday reality for the residents living within the putrid area just a few kilometres from central Manila. The worst of the conditions can be found at Tondo's ?Happyland' BRGY105 where the population has grown from around 3500 in in 2006 to more than 12,000 today. Happyland is literally built around a dump, or many dumps were people daily wade through rubbish looking for anything of value. Tons of chicken scraps are collected from takeaways garbage bins; recycled by boiling the sold to hungry families the the slums for a few pesos. The stench, heat and storms create a toxic combination of disease, but inadequate government health services mean the people of Tondo's worst slum just get sicker and sicker. Alan Niewald, founder of Las Vegas based US non profit Kilos Bayanihan, says the problem at Tondo is magnified at Happyland and has become a multi-generational trap. ?Education is extremely important in the Philippines but most children do not attend school because the parents have to choose whether to feed their children or send them to school then possibly not have enough food to feed them. I's a tough decision!,O Niewald says. ?There is a lack of opportunity to improve their lives. There should be more livelihood or community training programs available. There is also the age restrictions that most employers have. This also makes it harder to find a job. Most of the homeless are usually from the province that come to Manila to try and find a better life but end up homeless.O Niewald admits: ?I don't see anything being done by Duterte to change anything.O On his first anniversary Duterte declared he wanted to give every Filipino ?comfortable life for allO. Duterte should try telling that to the forgotten people of Happyland who live a daily nightmare.//MCDONNELLTED_1426.180
EN_01266531_0005 SIP
Children stare out from behind a discarded wire mattress at the Happyland slums. Manila, Philippines. Saturday, July 1, 2017 . One year after Philippines President Duterte's land slide election win the plight of more than 600,000 residents of Manila's slums in suburban Tondo is getting worse. Poverty, severe malnutrition and disease is an everyday reality for the residents living within the putrid area just a few kilometres from central Manila. The worst of the conditions can be found at Tondo's ?Happyland' BRGY105 where the population has grown from around 3500 in in 2006 to more than 12,000 today. Happyland is literally built around a dump, or many dumps were people daily wade through rubbish looking for anything of value. Tons of chicken scraps are collected from takeaways garbage bins; recycled by boiling the sold to hungry families the the slums for a few pesos. The stench, heat and storms create a toxic combination of disease, but inadequate government health services mean the people of Tondo's worst slum just get sicker and sicker. Alan Niewald, founder of Las Vegas based US non profit Kilos Bayanihan, says the problem at Tondo is magnified at Happyland and has become a multi-generational trap. ?Education is extremely important in the Philippines but most children do not attend school because the parents have to choose whether to feed their children or send them to school then possibly not have enough food to feed them. I's a tough decision!,O Niewald says. ?There is a lack of opportunity to improve their lives. There should be more livelihood or community training programs available. There is also the age restrictions that most employers have. This also makes it harder to find a job. Most of the homeless are usually from the province that come to Manila to try and find a better life but end up homeless.O Niewald admits: ?I don't see anything being done by Duterte to change anything.O On his first anniversary Duterte declared he wanted to give every Filipino ?comfortable life for allO. Duterte should try telling that to the forgotten people of Happyland who live a daily nightmare.//MCDONNELLTED_1426.174
EN_01266531_0006 SIP
Arlene Silao, of US non profit Kilos Bayanihan, administers medicine to a young child at Happyland slums. Manila, Philippines. Saturday, July 1, 2017. One year after Philippines President Duterte's land slide election win the plight of more than 600,000 residents of Manila's slums in suburban Tondo is getting worse. Poverty, severe malnutrition and disease is an everyday reality for the residents living within the putrid area just a few kilometres from central Manila. The worst of the conditions can be found at Tondo's ?Happyland' BRGY105 where the population has grown from around 3500 in in 2006 to more than 12,000 today. Happyland is literally built around a dump, or many dumps were people daily wade through rubbish looking for anything of value. Tons of chicken scraps are collected from takeaways garbage bins; recycled by boiling the sold to hungry families the the slums for a few pesos. The stench, heat and storms create a toxic combination of disease, but inadequate government health services mean the people of Tondo's worst slum just get sicker and sicker. Alan Niewald, founder of Las Vegas based US non profit Kilos Bayanihan, says the problem at Tondo is magnified at Happyland and has become a multi-generational trap. ?Education is extremely important in the Philippines but most children do not attend school because the parents have to choose whether to feed their children or send them to school then possibly not have enough food to feed them. I's a tough decision!,O Niewald says. ?There is a lack of opportunity to improve their lives. There should be more livelihood or community training programs available. There is also the age restrictions that most employers have. This also makes it harder to find a job. Most of the homeless are usually from the province that come to Manila to try and find a better life but end up homeless.O Niewald admits: ?I don't see anything being done by Duterte to change anything.O On his first anniversary Duterte declared he wanted to give every Filipino ?comfortable life for allO. Duterte should try telling that to the forgotten people of Happyland who live a daily nightmare.//MCDONNELLTED_1426.158
EN_01266531_0009 SIP
Children on a motorcycle sidecar at the Happyland slums. Manila, Philippines. Saturday, July 1, 2017 . One year after Philippines President Duterte's land slide election win the plight of more than 600,000 residents of Manila's slums in suburban Tondo is getting worse. Poverty, severe malnutrition and disease is an everyday reality for the residents living within the putrid area just a few kilometres from central Manila. The worst of the conditions can be found at Tondo's ?Happyland' BRGY105 where the population has grown from around 3500 in in 2006 to more than 12,000 today. Happyland is literally built around a dump, or many dumps were people daily wade through rubbish looking for anything of value. Tons of chicken scraps are collected from takeaways garbage bins; recycled by boiling the sold to hungry families the the slums for a few pesos. The stench, heat and storms create a toxic combination of disease, but inadequate government health services mean the people of Tondo's worst slum just get sicker and sicker. Alan Niewald, founder of Las Vegas based US non profit Kilos Bayanihan, says the problem at Tondo is magnified at Happyland and has become a multi-generational trap. ?Education is extremely important in the Philippines but most children do not attend school because the parents have to choose whether to feed their children or send them to school then possibly not have enough food to feed them. I's a tough decision!,O Niewald says. ?There is a lack of opportunity to improve their lives. There should be more livelihood or community training programs available. There is also the age restrictions that most employers have. This also makes it harder to find a job. Most of the homeless are usually from the province that come to Manila to try and find a better life but end up homeless.O Niewald admits: ?I don't see anything being done by Duterte to change anything.O On his first anniversary Duterte declared he wanted to give every Filipino ?comfortable life for allO. Duterte should try telling that to the forgotten people of Happyland who live a daily nightmare.//MCDONNELLTED_1426.168
EN_01266531_0041 SIP
A young sick toddler looks out onto the street at Happyland slums. Manila, Philippines. Saturday, July 1, 2017 . One year after Philippines President Duterte's land slide election win the plight of more than 600,000 residents of Manila's slums in suburban Tondo is getting worse. Poverty, severe malnutrition and disease is an everyday reality for the residents living within the putrid area just a few kilometres from central Manila. The worst of the conditions can be found at Tondo's ?Happyland' BRGY105 where the population has grown from around 3500 in in 2006 to more than 12,000 today. Happyland is literally built around a dump, or many dumps were people daily wade through rubbish looking for anything of value. Tons of chicken scraps are collected from takeaways garbage bins; recycled by boiling the sold to hungry families the the slums for a few pesos. The stench, heat and storms create a toxic combination of disease, but inadequate government health services mean the people of Tondo's worst slum just get sicker and sicker. Alan Niewald, founder of Las Vegas based US non profit Kilos Bayanihan, says the problem at Tondo is magnified at Happyland and has become a multi-generational trap. ?Education is extremely important in the Philippines but most children do not attend school because the parents have to choose whether to feed their children or send them to school then possibly not have enough food to feed them. I's a tough decision!,O Niewald says. ?There is a lack of opportunity to improve their lives. There should be more livelihood or community training programs available. There is also the age restrictions that most employers have. This also makes it harder to find a job. Most of the homeless are usually from the province that come to Manila to try and find a better life but end up homeless.O Niewald admits: ?I don't see anything being done by Duterte to change anything.O On his first anniversary Duterte declared he wanted to give every Filipino ?comfortable life for allO. Duterte should try telling that to the forgotten people of Happyland who live a daily nightmare.//MCDONNELLTED_1426.183
EN_01266531_0048 SIP
An elderly woman carries water through the darkened corridors at Happyland slums. Manila, Philippines. Saturday, July 1, 2017. One year after Philippines President Duterte's land slide election win the plight of more than 600,000 residents of Manila's slums in suburban Tondo is getting worse. Poverty, severe malnutrition and disease is an everyday reality for the residents living within the putrid area just a few kilometres from central Manila. The worst of the conditions can be found at Tondo's ?Happyland' BRGY105 where the population has grown from around 3500 in in 2006 to more than 12,000 today. Happyland is literally built around a dump, or many dumps were people daily wade through rubbish looking for anything of value. Tons of chicken scraps are collected from takeaways garbage bins; recycled by boiling the sold to hungry families the the slums for a few pesos. The stench, heat and storms create a toxic combination of disease, but inadequate government health services mean the people of Tondo's worst slum just get sicker and sicker. Alan Niewald, founder of Las Vegas based US non profit Kilos Bayanihan, says the problem at Tondo is magnified at Happyland and has become a multi-generational trap. ?Education is extremely important in the Philippines but most children do not attend school because the parents have to choose whether to feed their children or send them to school then possibly not have enough food to feed them. I's a tough decision!,O Niewald says. ?There is a lack of opportunity to improve their lives. There should be more livelihood or community training programs available. There is also the age restrictions that most employers have. This also makes it harder to find a job. Most of the homeless are usually from the province that come to Manila to try and find a better life but end up homeless.O Niewald admits: ?I don't see anything being done by Duterte to change anything.O On his first anniversary Duterte declared he wanted to give every Filipino ?comfortable life for allO. Duterte should try telling that to the forgotten people of Happyland who live a daily nightmare.//MCDONNELLTED_1426.156
EN_01266531_0050 SIP
The chaotic streets at Happyland slums. Manila, Philippines. Saturday, July 1, 2017 . One year after Philippines President Duterte's land slide election win the plight of more than 600,000 residents of Manila's slums in suburban Tondo is getting worse. Poverty, severe malnutrition and disease is an everyday reality for the residents living within the putrid area just a few kilometres from central Manila. The worst of the conditions can be found at Tondo's ?Happyland' BRGY105 where the population has grown from around 3500 in in 2006 to more than 12,000 today. Happyland is literally built around a dump, or many dumps were people daily wade through rubbish looking for anything of value. Tons of chicken scraps are collected from takeaways garbage bins; recycled by boiling the sold to hungry families the the slums for a few pesos. The stench, heat and storms create a toxic combination of disease, but inadequate government health services mean the people of Tondo's worst slum just get sicker and sicker. Alan Niewald, founder of Las Vegas based US non profit Kilos Bayanihan, says the problem at Tondo is magnified at Happyland and has become a multi-generational trap. ?Education is extremely important in the Philippines but most children do not attend school because the parents have to choose whether to feed their children or send them to school then possibly not have enough food to feed them. I's a tough decision!,O Niewald says. ?There is a lack of opportunity to improve their lives. There should be more livelihood or community training programs available. There is also the age restrictions that most employers have. This also makes it harder to find a job. Most of the homeless are usually from the province that come to Manila to try and find a better life but end up homeless.O Niewald admits: ?I don't see anything being done by Duterte to change anything.O On his first anniversary Duterte declared he wanted to give every Filipino ?comfortable life for allO. Duterte should try telling that to the forgotten people of Happyland who live a daily nightmare.//MCDONNELLTED_1426.182
EN_01266531_0052 SIP
An elderly man looks out of his window at Happyland slums. Manila, Philippines. Saturday, July 1, 2017 . One year after Philippines President Duterte's land slide election win the plight of more than 600,000 residents of Manila's slums in suburban Tondo is getting worse. Poverty, severe malnutrition and disease is an everyday reality for the residents living within the putrid area just a few kilometres from central Manila. The worst of the conditions can be found at Tondo's ?Happyland' BRGY105 where the population has grown from around 3500 in in 2006 to more than 12,000 today. Happyland is literally built around a dump, or many dumps were people daily wade through rubbish looking for anything of value. Tons of chicken scraps are collected from takeaways garbage bins; recycled by boiling the sold to hungry families the the slums for a few pesos. The stench, heat and storms create a toxic combination of disease, but inadequate government health services mean the people of Tondo's worst slum just get sicker and sicker. Alan Niewald, founder of Las Vegas based US non profit Kilos Bayanihan, says the problem at Tondo is magnified at Happyland and has become a multi-generational trap. ?Education is extremely important in the Philippines but most children do not attend school because the parents have to choose whether to feed their children or send them to school then possibly not have enough food to feed them. I's a tough decision!,O Niewald says. ?There is a lack of opportunity to improve their lives. There should be more livelihood or community training programs available. There is also the age restrictions that most employers have. This also makes it harder to find a job. Most of the homeless are usually from the province that come to Manila to try and find a better life but end up homeless.O Niewald admits: ?I don't see anything being done by Duterte to change anything.O On his first anniversary Duterte declared he wanted to give every Filipino ?comfortable life for allO. Duterte should try telling that to the forgotten people of Happyland who live a daily nightmare.//MCDONNELLTED_1426.181
EN_01266531_0053 SIP
A young girl tries to cool off in front of a fan at Happyland. Manila, Philippines. Saturday, July 1, 2017 . One year after Philippines President Duterte's land slide election win the plight of more than 600,000 residents of Manila's slums in suburban Tondo is getting worse. Poverty, severe malnutrition and disease is an everyday reality for the residents living within the putrid area just a few kilometres from central Manila. The worst of the conditions can be found at Tondo's ?Happyland' BRGY105 where the population has grown from around 3500 in in 2006 to more than 12,000 today. Happyland is literally built around a dump, or many dumps were people daily wade through rubbish looking for anything of value. Tons of chicken scraps are collected from takeaways garbage bins; recycled by boiling the sold to hungry families the the slums for a few pesos. The stench, heat and storms create a toxic combination of disease, but inadequate government health services mean the people of Tondo's worst slum just get sicker and sicker. Alan Niewald, founder of Las Vegas based US non profit Kilos Bayanihan, says the problem at Tondo is magnified at Happyland and has become a multi-generational trap. ?Education is extremely important in the Philippines but most children do not attend school because the parents have to choose whether to feed their children or send them to school then possibly not have enough food to feed them. I's a tough decision!,O Niewald says. ?There is a lack of opportunity to improve their lives. There should be more livelihood or community training programs available. There is also the age restrictions that most employers have. This also makes it harder to find a job. Most of the homeless are usually from the province that come to Manila to try and find a better life but end up homeless.O Niewald admits: ?I don't see anything being done by Duterte to change anything.O On his first anniversary Duterte declared he wanted to give every Filipino ?comfortable life for allO. Duterte should try telling that to the forgotten people of Happyland who live a daily nightmare.//MCDONNELLTED_1426.179
EN_01266531_0054 SIP
Rosemarie, a volunteer for US non profit Kilos Bayanihan, sits with her much loved dog under a religious picture in her one roomed home. Rosemarie, her husband and five children aged between 10yo and 20yo have lived at Happyland for more than 20 years. She sees her children chance to escape the slums through education. Manila, Philippines. Saturday, July 1, 2017 . One year after Philippines President Duterte's land slide election win the plight of more than 600,000 residents of Manila's slums in suburban Tondo is getting worse. Poverty, severe malnutrition and disease is an everyday reality for the residents living within the putrid area just a few kilometres from central Manila. The worst of the conditions can be found at Tondo's ?Happyland' BRGY105 where the population has grown from around 3500 in in 2006 to more than 12,000 today. Happyland is literally built around a dump, or many dumps were people daily wade through rubbish looking for anything of value. Tons of chicken scraps are collected from takeaways garbage bins; recycled by boiling the sold to hungry families the the slums for a few pesos. The stench, heat and storms create a toxic combination of disease, but inadequate government health services mean the people of Tondo's worst slum just get sicker and sicker. Alan Niewald, founder of Las Vegas based US non profit Kilos Bayanihan, says the problem at Tondo is magnified at Happyland and has become a multi-generational trap. ?Education is extremely important in the Philippines but most children do not attend school because the parents have to choose whether to feed their children or send them to school then possibly not have enough food to feed them. I's a tough decision!,O Niewald says. ?There is a lack of opportunity to improve their lives. There should be more livelihood or community training programs available. There is also the age restrictions that most employers have. This also makes it harder to find a job. Most of the homeless are usually from the province that come to Manila to try and find a better life but end up homeless.O Niewald admits: ?I don't see anything being done by Duterte to change anything.O On his first anniversary Duterte declared he wanted to give every Filipino ?comfortable life for allO. Duterte should try telling that to the forgotten people of Happyland who live a daily nightmare.//MCDONNELLTED_1426.178
EN_01266531_0055 SIP
A mother talks to her children at the Happyland slums. Manila, Philippines. Saturday, July 1, 2017 . One year after Philippines President Duterte's land slide election win the plight of more than 600,000 residents of Manila's slums in suburban Tondo is getting worse. Poverty, severe malnutrition and disease is an everyday reality for the residents living within the putrid area just a few kilometres from central Manila. The worst of the conditions can be found at Tondo's ?Happyland' BRGY105 where the population has grown from around 3500 in in 2006 to more than 12,000 today. Happyland is literally built around a dump, or many dumps were people daily wade through rubbish looking for anything of value. Tons of chicken scraps are collected from takeaways garbage bins; recycled by boiling the sold to hungry families the the slums for a few pesos. The stench, heat and storms create a toxic combination of disease, but inadequate government health services mean the people of Tondo's worst slum just get sicker and sicker. Alan Niewald, founder of Las Vegas based US non profit Kilos Bayanihan, says the problem at Tondo is magnified at Happyland and has become a multi-generational trap. ?Education is extremely important in the Philippines but most children do not attend school because the parents have to choose whether to feed their children or send them to school then possibly not have enough food to feed them. I's a tough decision!,O Niewald says. ?There is a lack of opportunity to improve their lives. There should be more livelihood or community training programs available. There is also the age restrictions that most employers have. This also makes it harder to find a job. Most of the homeless are usually from the province that come to Manila to try and find a better life but end up homeless.O Niewald admits: ?I don't see anything being done by Duterte to change anything.O On his first anniversary Duterte declared he wanted to give every Filipino ?comfortable life for allO. Duterte should try telling that to the forgotten people of Happyland who live a daily nightmare.//MCDONNELLTED_1426.177
EN_01266531_0056 SIP
Two children in a dark, wet corridor at the Happyland slums. Manila, Philippines. Saturday, July 1, 2017 . One year after Philippines President Duterte's land slide election win the plight of more than 600,000 residents of Manila's slums in suburban Tondo is getting worse. Poverty, severe malnutrition and disease is an everyday reality for the residents living within the putrid area just a few kilometres from central Manila. The worst of the conditions can be found at Tondo's ?Happyland' BRGY105 where the population has grown from around 3500 in in 2006 to more than 12,000 today. Happyland is literally built around a dump, or many dumps were people daily wade through rubbish looking for anything of value. Tons of chicken scraps are collected from takeaways garbage bins; recycled by boiling the sold to hungry families the the slums for a few pesos. The stench, heat and storms create a toxic combination of disease, but inadequate government health services mean the people of Tondo's worst slum just get sicker and sicker. Alan Niewald, founder of Las Vegas based US non profit Kilos Bayanihan, says the problem at Tondo is magnified at Happyland and has become a multi-generational trap. ?Education is extremely important in the Philippines but most children do not attend school because the parents have to choose whether to feed their children or send them to school then possibly not have enough food to feed them. I's a tough decision!,O Niewald says. ?There is a lack of opportunity to improve their lives. There should be more livelihood or community training programs available. There is also the age restrictions that most employers have. This also makes it harder to find a job. Most of the homeless are usually from the province that come to Manila to try and find a better life but end up homeless.O Niewald admits: ?I don't see anything being done by Duterte to change anything.O On his first anniversary Duterte declared he wanted to give every Filipino ?comfortable life for allO. Duterte should try telling that to the forgotten people of Happyland who live a daily nightmare.//MCDONNELLTED_1426.176
EN_01266531_0057 SIP
Children in their one roomed house at the Happyland slums. Manila, Philippines. Saturday, July 1, 2017 . One year after Philippines President Duterte's land slide election win the plight of more than 600,000 residents of Manila's slums in suburban Tondo is getting worse. Poverty, severe malnutrition and disease is an everyday reality for the residents living within the putrid area just a few kilometres from central Manila. The worst of the conditions can be found at Tondo's ?Happyland' BRGY105 where the population has grown from around 3500 in in 2006 to more than 12,000 today. Happyland is literally built around a dump, or many dumps were people daily wade through rubbish looking for anything of value. Tons of chicken scraps are collected from takeaways garbage bins; recycled by boiling the sold to hungry families the the slums for a few pesos. The stench, heat and storms create a toxic combination of disease, but inadequate government health services mean the people of Tondo's worst slum just get sicker and sicker. Alan Niewald, founder of Las Vegas based US non profit Kilos Bayanihan, says the problem at Tondo is magnified at Happyland and has become a multi-generational trap. ?Education is extremely important in the Philippines but most children do not attend school because the parents have to choose whether to feed their children or send them to school then possibly not have enough food to feed them. I's a tough decision!,O Niewald says. ?There is a lack of opportunity to improve their lives. There should be more livelihood or community training programs available. There is also the age restrictions that most employers have. This also makes it harder to find a job. Most of the homeless are usually from the province that come to Manila to try and find a better life but end up homeless.O Niewald admits: ?I don't see anything being done by Duterte to change anything.O On his first anniversary Duterte declared he wanted to give every Filipino ?comfortable life for allO. Duterte should try telling that to the forgotten people of Happyland who live a daily nightmare.//MCDONNELLTED_1426.175
EN_01266531_0058 SIP
Children searching through rubbish for anything of value at the Happyland slums. Manila, Philippines. Saturday, July 1, 2017 . One year after Philippines President Duterte's land slide election win the plight of more than 600,000 residents of Manila's slums in suburban Tondo is getting worse. Poverty, severe malnutrition and disease is an everyday reality for the residents living within the putrid area just a few kilometres from central Manila. The worst of the conditions can be found at Tondo's ?Happyland' BRGY105 where the population has grown from around 3500 in in 2006 to more than 12,000 today. Happyland is literally built around a dump, or many dumps were people daily wade through rubbish looking for anything of value. Tons of chicken scraps are collected from takeaways garbage bins; recycled by boiling the sold to hungry families the the slums for a few pesos. The stench, heat and storms create a toxic combination of disease, but inadequate government health services mean the people of Tondo's worst slum just get sicker and sicker. Alan Niewald, founder of Las Vegas based US non profit Kilos Bayanihan, says the problem at Tondo is magnified at Happyland and has become a multi-generational trap. ?Education is extremely important in the Philippines but most children do not attend school because the parents have to choose whether to feed their children or send them to school then possibly not have enough food to feed them. I's a tough decision!,O Niewald says. ?There is a lack of opportunity to improve their lives. There should be more livelihood or community training programs available. There is also the age restrictions that most employers have. This also makes it harder to find a job. Most of the homeless are usually from the province that come to Manila to try and find a better life but end up homeless.O Niewald admits: ?I don't see anything being done by Duterte to change anything.O On his first anniversary Duterte declared he wanted to give every Filipino ?comfortable life for allO. Duterte should try telling that to the forgotten people of Happyland who live a daily nightmare.//MCDONNELLTED_1426.173
EN_01266531_0059 SIP
A child walking through rubbish at the Happyland slums. Manila, Philippines. Saturday, July 1, 2017 . One year after Philippines President Duterte's land slide election win the plight of more than 600,000 residents of Manila's slums in suburban Tondo is getting worse. Poverty, severe malnutrition and disease is an everyday reality for the residents living within the putrid area just a few kilometres from central Manila. The worst of the conditions can be found at Tondo's ?Happyland' BRGY105 where the population has grown from around 3500 in in 2006 to more than 12,000 today. Happyland is literally built around a dump, or many dumps were people daily wade through rubbish looking for anything of value. Tons of chicken scraps are collected from takeaways garbage bins; recycled by boiling the sold to hungry families the the slums for a few pesos. The stench, heat and storms create a toxic combination of disease, but inadequate government health services mean the people of Tondo's worst slum just get sicker and sicker. Alan Niewald, founder of Las Vegas based US non profit Kilos Bayanihan, says the problem at Tondo is magnified at Happyland and has become a multi-generational trap. ?Education is extremely important in the Philippines but most children do not attend school because the parents have to choose whether to feed their children or send them to school then possibly not have enough food to feed them. I's a tough decision!,O Niewald says. ?There is a lack of opportunity to improve their lives. There should be more livelihood or community training programs available. There is also the age restrictions that most employers have. This also makes it harder to find a job. Most of the homeless are usually from the province that come to Manila to try and find a better life but end up homeless.O Niewald admits: ?I don't see anything being done by Duterte to change anything.O On his first anniversary Duterte declared he wanted to give every Filipino ?comfortable life for allO. Duterte should try telling that to the forgotten people of Happyland who live a daily nightmare.//MCDONNELLTED_1426.172
EN_01266531_0060 SIP
Boy posing at the Happyland slums. Manila, Philippines. Saturday, July 1, 2017 . One year after Philippines President Duterte's land slide election win the plight of more than 600,000 residents of Manila's slums in suburban Tondo is getting worse. Poverty, severe malnutrition and disease is an everyday reality for the residents living within the putrid area just a few kilometres from central Manila. The worst of the conditions can be found at Tondo's ?Happyland' BRGY105 where the population has grown from around 3500 in in 2006 to more than 12,000 today. Happyland is literally built around a dump, or many dumps were people daily wade through rubbish looking for anything of value. Tons of chicken scraps are collected from takeaways garbage bins; recycled by boiling the sold to hungry families the the slums for a few pesos. The stench, heat and storms create a toxic combination of disease, but inadequate government health services mean the people of Tondo's worst slum just get sicker and sicker. Alan Niewald, founder of Las Vegas based US non profit Kilos Bayanihan, says the problem at Tondo is magnified at Happyland and has become a multi-generational trap. ?Education is extremely important in the Philippines but most children do not attend school because the parents have to choose whether to feed their children or send them to school then possibly not have enough food to feed them. I's a tough decision!,O Niewald says. ?There is a lack of opportunity to improve their lives. There should be more livelihood or community training programs available. There is also the age restrictions that most employers have. This also makes it harder to find a job. Most of the homeless are usually from the province that come to Manila to try and find a better life but end up homeless.O Niewald admits: ?I don't see anything being done by Duterte to change anything.O On his first anniversary Duterte declared he wanted to give every Filipino ?comfortable life for allO. Duterte should try telling that to the forgotten people of Happyland who live a daily nightmare.//MCDONNELLTED_1426.171
EN_01266531_0061 SIP
Man carrying cardboard at the Happyland slums. Manila, Philippines. Saturday, July 1, 2017 . One year after Philippines President Duterte's land slide election win the plight of more than 600,000 residents of Manila's slums in suburban Tondo is getting worse. Poverty, severe malnutrition and disease is an everyday reality for the residents living within the putrid area just a few kilometres from central Manila. The worst of the conditions can be found at Tondo's ?Happyland' BRGY105 where the population has grown from around 3500 in in 2006 to more than 12,000 today. Happyland is literally built around a dump, or many dumps were people daily wade through rubbish looking for anything of value. Tons of chicken scraps are collected from takeaways garbage bins; recycled by boiling the sold to hungry families the the slums for a few pesos. The stench, heat and storms create a toxic combination of disease, but inadequate government health services mean the people of Tondo's worst slum just get sicker and sicker. Alan Niewald, founder of Las Vegas based US non profit Kilos Bayanihan, says the problem at Tondo is magnified at Happyland and has become a multi-generational trap. ?Education is extremely important in the Philippines but most children do not attend school because the parents have to choose whether to feed their children or send them to school then possibly not have enough food to feed them. I's a tough decision!,O Niewald says. ?There is a lack of opportunity to improve their lives. There should be more livelihood or community training programs available. There is also the age restrictions that most employers have. This also makes it harder to find a job. Most of the homeless are usually from the province that come to Manila to try and find a better life but end up homeless.O Niewald admits: ?I don't see anything being done by Duterte to change anything.O On his first anniversary Duterte declared he wanted to give every Filipino ?comfortable life for allO. Duterte should try telling that to the forgotten people of Happyland who live a daily nightmare.//MCDONNELLTED_1426.170
EN_01266531_0062 SIP
Two girls walking home in the streets of the Happyland slums. Manila, Philippines. Saturday, July 1, 2017 . One year after Philippines President Duterte's land slide election win the plight of more than 600,000 residents of Manila's slums in suburban Tondo is getting worse. Poverty, severe malnutrition and disease is an everyday reality for the residents living within the putrid area just a few kilometres from central Manila. The worst of the conditions can be found at Tondo's ?Happyland' BRGY105 where the population has grown from around 3500 in in 2006 to more than 12,000 today. Happyland is literally built around a dump, or many dumps were people daily wade through rubbish looking for anything of value. Tons of chicken scraps are collected from takeaways garbage bins; recycled by boiling the sold to hungry families the the slums for a few pesos. The stench, heat and storms create a toxic combination of disease, but inadequate government health services mean the people of Tondo's worst slum just get sicker and sicker. Alan Niewald, founder of Las Vegas based US non profit Kilos Bayanihan, says the problem at Tondo is magnified at Happyland and has become a multi-generational trap. ?Education is extremely important in the Philippines but most children do not attend school because the parents have to choose whether to feed their children or send them to school then possibly not have enough food to feed them. I's a tough decision!,O Niewald says. ?There is a lack of opportunity to improve their lives. There should be more livelihood or community training programs available. There is also the age restrictions that most employers have. This also makes it harder to find a job. Most of the homeless are usually from the province that come to Manila to try and find a better life but end up homeless.O Niewald admits: ?I don't see anything being done by Duterte to change anything.O On his first anniversary Duterte declared he wanted to give every Filipino ?comfortable life for allO. Duterte should try telling that to the forgotten people of Happyland who live a daily nightmare.//MCDONNELLTED_1426.169
EN_01266531_0063 SIP
A child stares out of his home at the Happyland slums. Manila, Philippines. Saturday, July 1, 2017 . One year after Philippines President Duterte's land slide election win the plight of more than 600,000 residents of Manila's slums in suburban Tondo is getting worse. Poverty, severe malnutrition and disease is an everyday reality for the residents living within the putrid area just a few kilometres from central Manila. The worst of the conditions can be found at Tondo's ?Happyland' BRGY105 where the population has grown from around 3500 in in 2006 to more than 12,000 today. Happyland is literally built around a dump, or many dumps were people daily wade through rubbish looking for anything of value. Tons of chicken scraps are collected from takeaways garbage bins; recycled by boiling the sold to hungry families the the slums for a few pesos. The stench, heat and storms create a toxic combination of disease, but inadequate government health services mean the people of Tondo's worst slum just get sicker and sicker. Alan Niewald, founder of Las Vegas based US non profit Kilos Bayanihan, says the problem at Tondo is magnified at Happyland and has become a multi-generational trap. ?Education is extremely important in the Philippines but most children do not attend school because the parents have to choose whether to feed their children or send them to school then possibly not have enough food to feed them. I's a tough decision!,O Niewald says. ?There is a lack of opportunity to improve their lives. There should be more livelihood or community training programs available. There is also the age restrictions that most employers have. This also makes it harder to find a job. Most of the homeless are usually from the province that come to Manila to try and find a better life but end up homeless.O Niewald admits: ?I don't see anything being done by Duterte to change anything.O On his first anniversary Duterte declared he wanted to give every Filipino ?comfortable life for allO. Duterte should try telling that to the forgotten people of Happyland who live a daily nightmare.//MCDONNELLTED_1426.167
EN_01266531_0064 SIP
A man peels labels from plastic bottles at the Happyland slums. He makes just a few pesos per kilogram. Manila, Philippines. Saturday, July 1, 2017 . One year after Philippines President Duterte's land slide election win the plight of more than 600,000 residents of Manila's slums in suburban Tondo is getting worse. Poverty, severe malnutrition and disease is an everyday reality for the residents living within the putrid area just a few kilometres from central Manila. The worst of the conditions can be found at Tondo's ?Happyland' BRGY105 where the population has grown from around 3500 in in 2006 to more than 12,000 today. Happyland is literally built around a dump, or many dumps were people daily wade through rubbish looking for anything of value. Tons of chicken scraps are collected from takeaways garbage bins; recycled by boiling the sold to hungry families the the slums for a few pesos. The stench, heat and storms create a toxic combination of disease, but inadequate government health services mean the people of Tondo's worst slum just get sicker and sicker. Alan Niewald, founder of Las Vegas based US non profit Kilos Bayanihan, says the problem at Tondo is magnified at Happyland and has become a multi-generational trap. ?Education is extremely important in the Philippines but most children do not attend school because the parents have to choose whether to feed their children or send them to school then possibly not have enough food to feed them. I's a tough decision!,O Niewald says. ?There is a lack of opportunity to improve their lives. There should be more livelihood or community training programs available. There is also the age restrictions that most employers have. This also makes it harder to find a job. Most of the homeless are usually from the province that come to Manila to try and find a better life but end up homeless.O Niewald admits: ?I don't see anything being done by Duterte to change anything.O On his first anniversary Duterte declared he wanted to give every Filipino ?comfortable life for allO. Duterte should try telling that to the forgotten people of Happyland who live a daily nightmare.//MCDONNELLTED_1426.162
EN_01266531_0065 SIP
Two boys surrounded by garbage in the Happyland slums. Manila, Philippines. Saturday, July 1, 2017 . One year after Philippines President Duterte's land slide election win the plight of more than 600,000 residents of Manila's slums in suburban Tondo is getting worse. Poverty, severe malnutrition and disease is an everyday reality for the residents living within the putrid area just a few kilometres from central Manila. The worst of the conditions can be found at Tondo's ?Happyland' BRGY105 where the population has grown from around 3500 in in 2006 to more than 12,000 today. Happyland is literally built around a dump, or many dumps were people daily wade through rubbish looking for anything of value. Tons of chicken scraps are collected from takeaways garbage bins; recycled by boiling the sold to hungry families the the slums for a few pesos. The stench, heat and storms create a toxic combination of disease, but inadequate government health services mean the people of Tondo's worst slum just get sicker and sicker. Alan Niewald, founder of Las Vegas based US non profit Kilos Bayanihan, says the problem at Tondo is magnified at Happyland and has become a multi-generational trap. ?Education is extremely important in the Philippines but most children do not attend school because the parents have to choose whether to feed their children or send them to school then possibly not have enough food to feed them. I's a tough decision!,O Niewald says. ?There is a lack of opportunity to improve their lives. There should be more livelihood or community training programs available. There is also the age restrictions that most employers have. This also makes it harder to find a job. Most of the homeless are usually from the province that come to Manila to try and find a better life but end up homeless.O Niewald admits: ?I don't see anything being done by Duterte to change anything.O On his first anniversary Duterte declared he wanted to give every Filipino ?comfortable life for allO. Duterte should try telling that to the forgotten people of Happyland who live a daily nightmare.//MCDONNELLTED_1426.163
EN_01266531_0066 SIP
A young man collecting wood at Happyland slums. Manila, Philippines. Saturday, July 1, 2017 . One year after Philippines President Duterte's land slide election win the plight of more than 600,000 residents of Manila's slums in suburban Tondo is getting worse. Poverty, severe malnutrition and disease is an everyday reality for the residents living within the putrid area just a few kilometres from central Manila. The worst of the conditions can be found at Tondo's ?Happyland' BRGY105 where the population has grown from around 3500 in in 2006 to more than 12,000 today. Happyland is literally built around a dump, or many dumps were people daily wade through rubbish looking for anything of value. Tons of chicken scraps are collected from takeaways garbage bins; recycled by boiling the sold to hungry families the the slums for a few pesos. The stench, heat and storms create a toxic combination of disease, but inadequate government health services mean the people of Tondo's worst slum just get sicker and sicker. Alan Niewald, founder of Las Vegas based US non profit Kilos Bayanihan, says the problem at Tondo is magnified at Happyland and has become a multi-generational trap. ?Education is extremely important in the Philippines but most children do not attend school because the parents have to choose whether to feed their children or send them to school then possibly not have enough food to feed them. I's a tough decision!,O Niewald says. ?There is a lack of opportunity to improve their lives. There should be more livelihood or community training programs available. There is also the age restrictions that most employers have. This also makes it harder to find a job. Most of the homeless are usually from the province that come to Manila to try and find a better life but end up homeless.O Niewald admits: ?I don't see anything being done by Duterte to change anything.O On his first anniversary Duterte declared he wanted to give every Filipino ?comfortable life for allO. Duterte should try telling that to the forgotten people of Happyland who live a daily nightmare.//MCDONNELLTED_1426.161
EN_01266531_0067 SIP
A mother and her children in their small one room 'home' at Happyland slums. Manila, Philippines. Saturday, July 1, 2017 . One year after Philippines President Duterte's land slide election win the plight of more than 600,000 residents of Manila's slums in suburban Tondo is getting worse. Poverty, severe malnutrition and disease is an everyday reality for the residents living within the putrid area just a few kilometres from central Manila. The worst of the conditions can be found at Tondo's ?Happyland' BRGY105 where the population has grown from around 3500 in in 2006 to more than 12,000 today. Happyland is literally built around a dump, or many dumps were people daily wade through rubbish looking for anything of value. Tons of chicken scraps are collected from takeaways garbage bins; recycled by boiling the sold to hungry families the the slums for a few pesos. The stench, heat and storms create a toxic combination of disease, but inadequate government health services mean the people of Tondo's worst slum just get sicker and sicker. Alan Niewald, founder of Las Vegas based US non profit Kilos Bayanihan, says the problem at Tondo is magnified at Happyland and has become a multi-generational trap. ?Education is extremely important in the Philippines but most children do not attend school because the parents have to choose whether to feed their children or send them to school then possibly not have enough food to feed them. I's a tough decision!,O Niewald says. ?There is a lack of opportunity to improve their lives. There should be more livelihood or community training programs available. There is also the age restrictions that most employers have. This also makes it harder to find a job. Most of the homeless are usually from the province that come to Manila to try and find a better life but end up homeless.O Niewald admits: ?I don't see anything being done by Duterte to change anything.O On his first anniversary Duterte declared he wanted to give every Filipino ?comfortable life for allO. Duterte should try telling that to the forgotten people of Happyland who live a daily nightmare.//MCDONNELLTED_1426.160
EN_01266531_0073 SIP
A woman peels garlic to make a few pesos at the Happyland slums. Manila, Philippines. Saturday, July 1, 2017 . One year after Philippines President Duterte's land slide election win the plight of more than 600,000 residents of Manila's slums in suburban Tondo is getting worse. Poverty, severe malnutrition and disease is an everyday reality for the residents living within the putrid area just a few kilometres from central Manila. The worst of the conditions can be found at Tondo's ?Happyland' BRGY105 where the population has grown from around 3500 in in 2006 to more than 12,000 today. Happyland is literally built around a dump, or many dumps were people daily wade through rubbish looking for anything of value. Tons of chicken scraps are collected from takeaways garbage bins; recycled by boiling the sold to hungry families the the slums for a few pesos. The stench, heat and storms create a toxic combination of disease, but inadequate government health services mean the people of Tondo's worst slum just get sicker and sicker. Alan Niewald, founder of Las Vegas based US non profit Kilos Bayanihan, says the problem at Tondo is magnified at Happyland and has become a multi-generational trap. ?Education is extremely important in the Philippines but most children do not attend school because the parents have to choose whether to feed their children or send them to school then possibly not have enough food to feed them. I's a tough decision!,O Niewald says. ?There is a lack of opportunity to improve their lives. There should be more livelihood or community training programs available. There is also the age restrictions that most employers have. This also makes it harder to find a job. Most of the homeless are usually from the province that come to Manila to try and find a better life but end up homeless.O Niewald admits: ?I don't see anything being done by Duterte to change anything.O On his first anniversary Duterte declared he wanted to give every Filipino ?comfortable life for allO. Duterte should try telling that to the forgotten people of Happyland who live a daily nightmare.//MCDONNELLTED_1426.159
EN_01266531_0076 SIP
A young girl wanders through the corridors at Happyland slums. Manila, Philippines. Saturday, July 1, 2017. One year after Philippines President Duterte's land slide election win the plight of more than 600,000 residents of Manila's slums in suburban Tondo is getting worse. Poverty, severe malnutrition and disease is an everyday reality for the residents living within the putrid area just a few kilometres from central Manila. The worst of the conditions can be found at Tondo's ?Happyland' BRGY105 where the population has grown from around 3500 in in 2006 to more than 12,000 today. Happyland is literally built around a dump, or many dumps were people daily wade through rubbish looking for anything of value. Tons of chicken scraps are collected from takeaways garbage bins; recycled by boiling the sold to hungry families the the slums for a few pesos. The stench, heat and storms create a toxic combination of disease, but inadequate government health services mean the people of Tondo's worst slum just get sicker and sicker. Alan Niewald, founder of Las Vegas based US non profit Kilos Bayanihan, says the problem at Tondo is magnified at Happyland and has become a multi-generational trap. ?Education is extremely important in the Philippines but most children do not attend school because the parents have to choose whether to feed their children or send them to school then possibly not have enough food to feed them. I's a tough decision!,O Niewald says. ?There is a lack of opportunity to improve their lives. There should be more livelihood or community training programs available. There is also the age restrictions that most employers have. This also makes it harder to find a job. Most of the homeless are usually from the province that come to Manila to try and find a better life but end up homeless.O Niewald admits: ?I don't see anything being done by Duterte to change anything.O On his first anniversary Duterte declared he wanted to give every Filipino ?comfortable life for allO. Duterte should try telling that to the forgotten people of Happyland who live a daily nightmare.//MCDONNELLTED_1426.157