poniedziałek, 11 grudnia 2017
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Miasto wdów w Indiach - Redux (19)

! EN_01265904_0012 RED
Danwanti holding a portrait of her spiritual leader (guru) on December 8, 2015. Danwanti married her husband (than 25) at the age of 15. After three years of marriage, her husband died from malaria. 15 years ago she left behind everything and came to Vrindavan. She has one son and one daughter. She loves to sing devotional songs to Krishna. The small town of Vrindavan, Uttar Pradesh, India is home to about 22.000 widows. Widows migrate to the ashrams of this holy city due to discrimination and marginalization as traditional superstitions make them being regarded as inauspicious. They are shunned by society, barred from most religious activities and sometimes even abandoned by their own children. In order to attain salvation from the cycle of rebirth and suffering they live a life devoted to the Hindu god Krishna in Vrindavan. The social stigma of widowhood makes them being dependent on charity, begging and singing devotional songs for money in local Ashrams.
ADDITIONAL TEXT AVAILABLE MINIMUM PRICE $100
! EN_01265904_0004 RED
Kiran Dasi (97) came from Bangladesh to Vrindavan in 1998. She wanted to devote her life to Krishna after her only daughter founded her own family. The small town of Vrindavan, Uttar Pradesh, India is home to about 22.000 widows. Widows migrate to the ashrams of this holy city due to discrimination and marginalization as traditional superstitions make them being regarded as inauspicious. They are shunned by society, barred from most religious activities and sometimes even abandoned by their own children. In order to attain salvation from the cycle of rebirth and suffering they live a life devoted to the Hindu god Krishna in Vrindavan. The social stigma of widowhood makes them being dependent on charity, begging and singing devotional songs for money in local Ashrams.
ADDITIONAL TEXT AVAILABLE MINIMUM PRICE $100
! EN_01265904_0007 RED
Bani Mukharji sitting on her bed in an ashram in Vrindavan on December 2, 2015. She has three children, who abandoned her after her husband passed away. Eventhough widows are expected to wear mainly white clothes, the color that symbolizes death and their asexuality, she still has an affection for clothes and possesses many dresses. The small town of Vrindavan, Uttar Pradesh, India is home to about 22.000 widows. Widows migrate to the ashrams of this holy city due to discrimination and marginalization as traditional superstitions make them being regarded as inauspicious. They are shunned by society, barred from most religious activities and sometimes even abandoned by their own children. In order to attain salvation from the cycle of rebirth and suffering they live a life devoted to the Hindu god Krishna in Vrindavan. The social stigma of widowhood makes them being dependent on charity, begging and singing devotional songs for money in local Ashrams.
ADDITIONAL TEXT AVAILABLE MINIMUM PRICE $100
! EN_01265904_0003 RED
Mahanu Dashi (68) came from Assam to Vrindavan many years ago. The small town of Vrindavan, Uttar Pradesh, India is home to about 22.000 widows. Widows migrate to the ashrams of this holy city due to discrimination and marginalization as traditional superstitions make them being regarded as inauspicious. They are shunned by society, barred from most religious activities and sometimes even abandoned by their own children. In order to attain salvation from the cycle of rebirth and suffering they live a life devoted to the Hindu god Krishna in Vrindavan. The social stigma of widowhood makes them being dependent on charity, begging and singing devotional songs for money in local Ashrams.
ADDITIONAL TEXT AVAILABLE MINIMUM PRICE $100
! EN_01265904_0010 RED
A widow is walking barefoot through a street in Radhakund, a small village close to Vrindavan, India. Hindus regard the location as the holy birthplace of god Krishna. Many pilgrims take off their shoes while walking through the area. The small town of Vrindavan, Uttar Pradesh, India is home to about 22.000 widows. Widows migrate to the ashrams of this holy city due to discrimination and marginalization as traditional superstitions make them being regarded as inauspicious. They are shunned by society, barred from most religious activities and sometimes even abandoned by their own children. In order to attain salvation from the cycle of rebirth and suffering they live a life devoted to the Hindu god Krishna in Vrindavan. The social stigma of widowhood makes them being dependent on charity, begging and singing devotional songs for money in local Ashrams.
ADDITIONAL TEXT AVAILABLE MINIMUM PRICE $100
! EN_01265904_0001 RED
Sushila Pal (76) became a widow at the age of 26. She came from West Bengal to Vrindavan 20 years ago. She has no children and no one to look after her. The small town of Vrindavan, Uttar Pradesh, India is home to about 22.000 widows. Widows migrate to the ashrams of this holy city due to discrimination and marginalization as traditional superstitions make them being regarded as inauspicious. They are shunned by society, barred from most religious activities and sometimes even abandoned by their own children. In order to attain salvation from the cycle of rebirth and suffering they live a life devoted to the Hindu god Krishna in Vrindavan. The social stigma of widowhood makes them being dependent on charity, begging and singing devotional songs for money in local Ashrams.
ADDITIONAL TEXT AVAILABLE MINIMUM PRICE $100
! EN_01265904_0018 RED
A group of widows is walking through the streets of Vrindavan on November 27, 2015. The small town of Vrindavan, Uttar Pradesh, India is home to about 22.000 widows. Widows migrate to the ashrams of this holy city due to discrimination and marginalization as traditional superstitions make them being regarded as inauspicious. They are shunned by society, barred from most religious activities and sometimes even abandoned by their own children. In order to attain salvation from the cycle of rebirth and suffering they live a life devoted to the Hindu god Krishna in Vrindavan. The social stigma of widowhood makes them being dependent on charity, begging and singing devotional songs for money in local Ashrams.
ADDITIONAL TEXT AVAILABLE MINIMUM PRICE $100
! EN_01265904_0008 RED
A widow is watching a soap opera in her ashram's community room on November 25, 2015. The small town of Vrindavan, Uttar Pradesh, India is home to about 22.000 widows. Widows migrate to the ashrams of this holy city due to discrimination and marginalization as traditional superstitions make them being regarded as inauspicious. They are shunned by society, barred from most religious activities and sometimes even abandoned by their own children. In order to attain salvation from the cycle of rebirth and suffering they live a life devoted to the Hindu god Krishna in Vrindavan. The social stigma of widowhood makes them being dependent on charity, begging and singing devotional songs for money in local Ashrams.
ADDITIONAL TEXT AVAILABLE MINIMUM PRICE $100
! EN_01265904_0014 RED
A widow standing on a window of her ashram in Vrindavan on November 25, 2015. The small town of Vrindavan, Uttar Pradesh, India is home to about 22.000 widows. Widows migrate to the ashrams of this holy city due to discrimination and marginalization as traditional superstitions make them being regarded as inauspicious. They are shunned by society, barred from most religious activities and sometimes even abandoned by their own children. In order to attain salvation from the cycle of rebirth and suffering they live a life devoted to the Hindu god Krishna in Vrindavan. The social stigma of widowhood makes them being dependent on charity, begging and singing devotional songs for money in local Ashrams.
ADDITIONAL TEXT AVAILABLE MINIMUM PRICE $100
! EN_01265904_0009 RED
A widow is walking through a small street in Vrindavan, India on November 24, 2015. The small town of Vrindavan, Uttar Pradesh, India is home to about 22.000 widows. Widows migrate to the ashrams of this holy city due to discrimination and marginalization as traditional superstitions make them being regarded as inauspicious. They are shunned by society, barred from most religious activities and sometimes even abandoned by their own children. In order to attain salvation from the cycle of rebirth and suffering they live a life devoted to the Hindu god Krishna in Vrindavan. The social stigma of widowhood makes them being dependent on charity, begging and singing devotional songs for money in local Ashrams.
ADDITIONAL TEXT AVAILABLE MINIMUM PRICE $100
! EN_01265904_0011 RED
Besaki Dasi (75) on the way from her ashram to beg in the streets. She came to Vrindavan 35 years ago. The small town of Vrindavan, Uttar Pradesh, India is home to about 22.000 widows. They migrate to the ashrams of this holy city due to discrimination and marginalization as traditional superstitions make them being regarded as inauspicious. They are shunned by society and, sometimes, their own children who abandon them after the demise of the husband. In order to attain salvation from the cycle of rebirth they live a life devoted to the Hindu god Krishna. The social stigma of widowhood makes them being dependent on begging, singing devotional songs for money, and charity.
ADDITIONAL TEXT AVAILABLE MINIMUM PRICE $100
! EN_01265904_0015 RED
Kali Kund (75) married at the age of 18. Her three sons and one daughter abandoned her after the demise of her husband, 14 years ago. The small town of Vrindavan, Uttar Pradesh, India is home to about 22.000 widows. Widows migrate to the ashrams of this holy city due to discrimination and marginalization as traditional superstitions make them being regarded as inauspicious. They are shunned by society, barred from most religious activities and sometimes even abandoned by their own children. In order to attain salvation from the cycle of rebirth and suffering they live a life devoted to the Hindu god Krishna in Vrindavan. The social stigma of widowhood makes them being dependent on charity, begging and singing devotional songs for money in local Ashrams.
ADDITIONAL TEXT AVAILABLE MINIMUM PRICE $100
! EN_01265904_0016 RED
Portrait of a widow in the street. Windu Das (85) came from West Bengal to Vrindavan many years ago. The small town of Vrindavan, Uttar Pradesh, India is home to about 22.000 widows. Widows migrate to the ashrams of this holy city due to discrimination and marginalization as traditional superstitions make them being regarded as inauspicious. They are shunned by society, barred from most religious activities and sometimes even abandoned by their own children. In order to attain salvation from the cycle of rebirth and suffering they live a life devoted to the Hindu god Krishna in Vrindavan. The social stigma of widowhood makes them being dependent on charity, begging and singing devotional songs for money in local Ashrams.
ADDITIONAL TEXT AVAILABLE MINIMUM PRICE $100
! EN_01265904_0017 RED
A widow is begging in the streets of Vrindavan on November 24, 2015. The small town of Vrindavan, Uttar Pradesh, India is home to about 22.000 widows. Widows migrate to the ashrams of this holy city due to discrimination and marginalization as traditional superstitions make them being regarded as inauspicious. They are shunned by society, barred from most religious activities and sometimes even abandoned by their own children. In order to attain salvation from the cycle of rebirth and suffering they live a life devoted to the Hindu god Krishna in Vrindavan. The social stigma of widowhood makes them being dependent on charity, begging and singing devotional songs for money in local Ashrams.
ADDITIONAL TEXT AVAILABLE MINIMUM PRICE $100
! EN_01265904_0019 RED
A group of widows is singing devotional songs in their ashram in Vrindavan on November 24, 2015. The small town of Vrindavan, Uttar Pradesh, India is home to about 22.000 widows. Widows migrate to the ashrams of this holy city due to discrimination and marginalization as traditional superstitions make them being regarded as inauspicious. They are shunned by society, barred from most religious activities and sometimes even abandoned by their own children. In order to attain salvation from the cycle of rebirth and suffering they live a life devoted to the Hindu god Krishna in Vrindavan. The social stigma of widowhood makes them being dependent on charity, begging and singing devotional songs for money in local Ashrams.
ADDITIONAL TEXT AVAILABLE MINIMUM PRICE $100
! EN_01265904_0002 RED
A group of widows is performing a religious ceremony inside their room in an ashram in Vrindavan on November 23, 2015. The small town of Vrindavan, Uttar Pradesh, India is home to about 22.000 widows. Widows migrate to the ashrams of this holy city due to discrimination and marginalization as traditional superstitions make them being regarded as inauspicious. They are shunned by society, barred from most religious activities and sometimes even abandoned by their own children. In order to attain salvation from the cycle of rebirth and suffering they live a life devoted to the Hindu god Krishna in Vrindavan. The social stigma of widowhood makes them being dependent on charity, begging and singing devotional songs for money in local Ashrams.
ADDITIONAL TEXT AVAILABLE MINIMUM PRICE $100
! EN_01265904_0005 RED
Two widows comforting each other after an emotional breakdown. Sachirani Dasi (left) (70) became a widow at the age of 45. She has no children. Chapla Nath (right) has one son and two daughtes. She married at the age of 15. After eight years of marriage her husband passed away. The small town of Vrindavan, Uttar Pradesh, India is home to about 22.000 widows. Widows migrate to the ashrams of this holy city due to discrimination and marginalization as traditional superstitions make them being regarded as inauspicious. They are shunned by society, barred from most religious activities and sometimes even abandoned by their own children. In order to attain salvation from the cycle of rebirth and suffering they live a life devoted to the Hindu god Krishna in Vrindavan. The social stigma of widowhood makes them being dependent on charity, begging and singing devotional songs for money in local Ashrams.
ADDITIONAL TEXT AVAILABLE MINIMUM PRICE $100
! EN_01265904_0006 RED
Two widows comforting each other after an emotional breakdown. Sachirani Dasi (left) (70) became a widow at the age of 45. She has no children. Chapla Nath (right) has one son and two daughtes. She married at the age of 15. After eight years of marriage her husband passed away. The small town of Vrindavan, Uttar Pradesh, India is home to about 22.000 widows. Widows migrate to the ashrams of this holy city due to discrimination and marginalization as traditional superstitions make them being regarded as inauspicious. They are shunned by society, barred from most religious activities and sometimes even abandoned by their own children. In order to attain salvation from the cycle of rebirth and suffering they live a life devoted to the Hindu god Krishna in Vrindavan. The social stigma of widowhood makes them being dependent on charity, begging and singing devotional songs for money in local Ashrams.
ADDITIONAL TEXT AVAILABLE MINIMUM PRICE $100
! EN_01265904_0013 RED
A widow is standing outside her ashram while a group of women is passing by. Widows in India are expected to wear white clothes and abstain from wearing jewelry in order to symbolize their asexuality. The small town of Vrindavan, Uttar Pradesh, India is home to about 22.000 widows. Widows migrate to the ashrams of this holy city due to discrimination and marginalization as traditional superstitions make them being regarded as inauspicious. They are shunned by society, barred from most religious activities and sometimes even abandoned by their own children. In order to attain salvation from the cycle of rebirth and suffering they live a life devoted to the Hindu god Krishna in Vrindavan. The social stigma of widowhood makes them being dependent on charity, begging and singing devotional songs for money in local Ashrams.
ADDITIONAL TEXT AVAILABLE MINIMUM PRICE $100