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Zoologia (90)

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! EN_01354334_0368 SCI
Asian and European hornets, illustration. At left is the Asian hornet (Vespa velutina). At right is the European hornet (Vespa crabro). The Asian hornet is an invasive species. It will capture, kill and dismember bees and carry them off to feed its larvae. Once a beehive is found by this species, the entire population of bees can be killed within hours. This hornet, also called the Asian predatory wasp, is native to China. It has become an invasive species in France, first appearing in around 2004, and has been spreading since then, reaching northern Spain in around 2010. The European hornet is the largest of the European wasps, and can reach a body length of 3.5 centimetres.
! EN_01354334_0369 SCI
Duvalius abyssimus cave beetle discovery, illustration. This beetle was first described in 2014. It was discovered in 2010 and 2013 during expeditions to the Krubera-Voronja cave complex in Abkhazia. This beetle is 6 millimetres long, has no wings, cannot see, and has no body pigment. The the discovery site (diagram at right) is shown as more than 600 metres below ground, at a temperature of 3 degrees Celsius. These caves are among the deepest in the world.
! EN_01094016_0427 SCI
Coastal wildlife. Computer artwork showing the varying forms of wildlife found at different depths on a gently sloping Mediterranean coast, with an inset showing sand-dwelling life (lower right).
! EN_01094016_0428 SCI
Coastal wildlife. Computer artwork showing the varying forms of wildlife found at different depths on a steep wave-swept Mediterranean coast, with two insets showing plankton (upper right) and cave life (lower left).
EN_00961162_4044 AFL
Drawings of Various Butterflies and Insects
EN_00961162_4045 AFL
Drawings of Various Butterflies and Insects
EN_00957730_2624 PHO
Illustration showing the conduction pathway in the left ventricle of a pig heart.
! EN_00952097_2374 IKO
Birds and compass on map
! EN_90259297_0001 SCI
PHOTO: EAST NEWS/SCIENCE PHOTO LIBRARY Fragile environments, conceptual image. Computer artwork of a ladybird on a leaf in front of green images of plants, representing the fragility of animal habitats.
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! EN_90250803_0001 SCI
PHOTO: EAST NEWS/SCIENCE PHOTO LIBRARY Cell division. Computer artwork of an animal cell undergoing mitosis (nuclear division) and cytokinesis (cell division).
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! EN_90264966_0001 SCI
PHOTO: EAST NEWS/SCIENCE PHOTO LIBRARY Killer whale (Orcinus orca), computer artwork.
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! EN_90248955_0001 SCI
PHOTO: EAST NEWS/SCIENCE PHOTO LIBRARY Bovine digestion, X-ray artwork. The digestive system of the cow (Bos taurus) is shown in blue, from the oesophagus (left) through the stomachs (centre) to the instestines (right) to the anus (far right) and an example of a stool (lower right). The cow is an example of a ruminant, a mammal that digests plants by regurgitating it from the first stomach, a fore-stomach known as the rumen, and chewing it again. Two further fore-stomachs aid digestion, before the food is passed to the true stomach, and then to the intestines.
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! EN_90284855_0001 SCI
PHOTO: EAST NEWS/SCIENCE PHOTO LIBRARY Whale sonar. Artwork of the sonar mechanism used by whales to detect their prey (squid, far right). The waveform across bottom (yellow) shows the pulses of sonar (grey cone) sent out from the whale's head. The echoes are also shown returning from the squid, and show up on the waveform as the smaller peaks. Whales are marine mammals found throughout the world's oceans.
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! EN_90245936_0001 SCI
PHOTO: EAST NEWS/SCIENCE PHOTO LIBRARY Animal cell. Computer artwork of an expanded animal cell. At centre left is the nucleus (purple sphere), which contains the cell's genetic information in the form of DNA (deoxyribonucleic acid, purple stings). Surrounding the nucleus is endoplasmic reticulum (ER, green), a membrane bound organelle that is the site of lipid synthesis and the production of membrane-bound proteins. Also seen are Golgi bodies (orange), a membrane-bound organelle that modifies and packages proteins, and mitochondria (transparent, one at upper centre), which produce the cell's energy.
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! EN_90245936_0002 SCI
PHOTO: EAST NEWS/SCIENCE PHOTO LIBRARY Animal cell. Computer artwork of an expanded animal cell. At centre left is the nucleus (purple sphere), which contains the cell's genetic information in the form of DNA (deoxyribonucleic acid, purple stings). Surrounding the nucleus is endoplasmic reticulum (ER, green), a membrane bound organelle that is the site of lipid synthesis and the production of membrane-bound proteins. Also seen are Golgi bodies (orange), a membrane-bound organelle that modifies and packages proteins, and mitochondria (transparent, one at upper centre), which produce the cell's energy.
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! EN_90187921_0001 SCI
PHOTO: EAST NEWS/SCIENCE PHOTO LIBRARY Animal cell. Cutaway artwork showing the inside of a typical animal cell. The nucleus (large round, upper centre) contains genetic material. This is surrounded by a system of membranes known as the endoplasmic reticulum (blue) and the gogli apparatus (green). Secretory granules (round, grey) are also seen.
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! EN_90242561_0001 SCI
PHOTO: EAST NEWS/SCIENCE PHOTO LIBRARY White beaked dolphin (Lagenorhynchus albirostris) sounds, wavelet graph. This image was produced by converting the frequencies of sounds made by a white beaked dolphin into a graph using a mathematical process known as wavelets. Wavelets reveal structure and detail that are not always visible in standard graphs of frequency over time (known as a spectrogram). This image has been plotted as a polar coordinate (circular) graph but wavelet graphs can also be in rectangular form. Dolphins produce a wide variety of high frequency vocalisations, such as clicks, whistles and cries. These sounds are used for echolocation and communication with other dolphins. They can be recorded using underwater hydrophones. Image created by Mark Fischer from Aguasonic Acoustics, USA.
Wysoka rozdzielczosc dostepna na zamowienie
! EN_90242561_0002 SCI
PHOTO: EAST NEWS/SCIENCE PHOTO LIBRARY White beaked dolphin (Lagenorhynchus albirostris) sounds, wavelet graph. This image was produced by converting the frequencies of sounds made by a white beaked dolphin into a graph using a mathematical process known as wavelets. Wavelets reveal structure and detail that are not always visible in standard graphs of frequency over time (known as a spectrogram). This image has been plotted as a polar coordinate (circular) graph but wavelet graphs can also be in rectangular form. Dolphins produce a wide variety of high frequency vocalisations, such as clicks, whistles and cries. These sounds are used for echolocation and communication with other dolphins. They can be recorded using underwater hydrophones. Image created by Mark Fischer from Aguasonic Acoustics, USA.
Wysoka rozdzielczosc dostepna na zamowienie
! EN_90242561_0003 SCI
PHOTO: EAST NEWS/SCIENCE PHOTO LIBRARY White beaked dolphin (Lagenorhynchus albirostris) sounds, wavelet graph. This image was produced by converting the frequencies of sounds made by a white beaked dolphin into a graph using a mathematical process known as wavelets. Wavelets reveal structure and detail that are not always visible in standard graphs of frequency over time (known as a spectrogram). This image has been plotted as a polar coordinate (circular) graph but wavelet graphs can also be in rectangular form. Dolphins produce a wide variety of high frequency vocalisations, such as clicks, whistles and cries. These sounds are used for echolocation and communication with other dolphins. They can be recorded using underwater hydrophones. Image created by Mark Fischer from Aguasonic Acoustics, USA.
Wysoka rozdzielczosc dostepna na zamowienie
! EN_90242561_0004 SCI
PHOTO: EAST NEWS/SCIENCE PHOTO LIBRARY White beaked dolphin (Lagenorhynchus albirostris) sounds, wavelet graph. This image was produced by converting the frequencies of sounds made by a white beaked dolphin into a graph using a mathematical process known as wavelets. Wavelets reveal structure and detail that are not always visible in standard graphs of frequency over time (known as a spectrogram). This image has been plotted as a polar coordinate (circular) graph but wavelet graphs can also be in rectangular form. Dolphins produce a wide variety of high frequency vocalisations, such as clicks, whistles and cries. These sounds are used for echolocation and communication with other dolphins. They can be recorded using underwater hydrophones. Image created by Mark Fischer from Aguasonic Acoustics, USA.
Wysoka rozdzielczosc dostepna na zamowienie

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