piątek, 20 października 2017
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Zoologia (86)

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! EN_90247969_0001 SCI
PHOTO: EAST NEWS/SCIENCE PHOTO LIBRARY Belemnite. Artwork of a belemnite marine invertebrate. Belemnites were cephalopods, the group of animals that includes squid. They appeared during the Carboniferous Period (around 350 million years ago), and went extinct towards the end of the Cretaceous Period (65 million years ago).
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! EN_90187919_0001 SCI
PHOTO: EAST NEWS/SCIENCE PHOTO LIBRARY Animal cell structure. Computer artwork of a section through an animal cell. At the centre is the nucleus (red), which contains the cell's genetic information in the form of DNA (deoxyribonucleic acid, blue). Surrounding the nucleus is endoplasmic reticulum (ER, bright blue), a membrane bound organelle that is the site of lipid synthesis and the production of membrane- bound proteins. ER may be either rough (RER), that is with ribosomes (blue dots), or smooth (SER), without ribosomes. Also present are mitochondria (blue ovals), which produce the cell's energy, and golgi bodies (dark green), a membrane-bound organelle that modifies and packages proteins. The bright green spheres are storage vesicles. The cell membrane (dark blue) is a phospholipid bilayer that contains proteins that act as channels and receptors.
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! EN_90250422_0001 SCI
PHOTO: EAST NEWS/SCIENCE PHOTO LIBRARY Carbon cycle. Artwork illustrating the global carbon cycle. Carbon is stored in the Earth's biosphere (flora, fauna, soil and freshwater), geosphere (geological store), hydrosphere (oceans) and atmosphere. It is exchanged between these reservoirs by biological, chemical and physical processes (indicated by arrows). The global carbon budget is the balance between the carbon reservoirs.
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! EN_90250422_0002 SCI
PHOTO: EAST NEWS/SCIENCE PHOTO LIBRARY Carbon cycle. Artwork illustrating the global carbon cycle. Carbon is stored in the Earth's biosphere (flora, fauna, soil and freshwater), geosphere (geological store), hydrosphere (oceans) and atmosphere. It is exchanged between these reservoirs by biological, chemical and physical processes (indicated by arrows). The global carbon budget is the balance between the carbon reservoirs.
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! EN_90237582_0001 SCI
PHOTO: EAST NEWS/SCIENCE PHOTO LIBRARY Snail shell, abstract artwork.
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! EN_90237583_0001 SCI
PHOTO: EAST NEWS/SCIENCE PHOTO LIBRARY Snail shell, artwork.
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! EN_90237583_0002 SCI
PHOTO: EAST NEWS/SCIENCE PHOTO LIBRARY Snail shell, artwork.
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! EN_90227658_0001 SCI
PHOTO: EAST NEWS/SCIENCE PHOTO LIBRARY Jumping spider (family Salticidae), computer artwork. The spider is in mid-air, in the process of jumping. This spider is a visual hunter, and it creeps up on its prey before jumping on them. Its eyes (white) and large fangs are seen here.
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! EN_90231502_0001 SCI
PHOTO: EAST NEWS/SCIENCE PHOTO LIBRARY Mosquito sucking blood, computer artwork. The mosquito is using its proboscis to pierce the skin of its host and suck blood on which to feed. Mosquitoes (family Culicidae) are a vector for several human diseases, such as malaria and yellow fever. Only the female of the species suck blood.
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! EN_90231502_0002 SCI
PHOTO: EAST NEWS/SCIENCE PHOTO LIBRARY Mosquito sucking blood, computer artwork. The mosquito is using its proboscis to pierce the skin of its host and suck blood on which to feed. Mosquitoes (family Culicidae) are a vector for several human diseases, such as malaria and yellow fever. Only the female of the species suck blood.
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! EN_90238312_0001 SCI
PHOTO: EAST NEWS/SCIENCE PHOTO LIBRARY Spider on its web, computer artwork. The web is used by a spider to catch its prey, such as flies and other insects. Spiders are arachnids in the order Araneae. They have eight legs and segmented bodies.
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! EN_90249186_0001 SCI
PHOTO: EAST NEWS/SCIENCE PHOTO LIBRARY British reedbed ecosystem, artwork. Birds shown include a hobby (foreground), a marsh harrier (top, left), and several swallows (top, centre). In the pond there is an otter (centre) and a water vole (right), a great crested newt (left), eels (left and centre) and rudd (right). Microscopic life is shown in the inset. Men are harvesting thatch at upper right.
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! EN_90282256_0001 SCI
PHOTO: EAST NEWS/SCIENCE PHOTO LIBRARY Tobacco hornworm (Manduca sexta) with a damaged tobacco plant, artwork. This species is common throughout North America. Eggs (right, lower) are laid on the underside of the leaves of the tobacco plant (Nicotiana sp.). These hatch into larvae (right, second from bottom) that feed on the plant. Although the nicotine in the leaves is toxic to many organisms, the hornworm larvae are able to sequester and secrete it. The damage to the plant by feeding larvae can be seen on the lower leaves. The larvae bury themselves in the ground to form a pupa (right, second from top). After about 18 days the adult moth (right, top) emerges.
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! EN_90227651_0001 SCI
PHOTO: EAST NEWS/SCIENCE PHOTO LIBRARY Jumping plant louse. Artwork of a turquoise- coloured species of psyllid, a herbivorous insect occasionally found on nettles.
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! EN_90227651_0002 SCI
PHOTO: EAST NEWS/SCIENCE PHOTO LIBRARY Jumping plant louse (Trioza urticae), artwork. This species of psyllid usually folds its wings over its body like a tent. Shown at top are enlarged views of various parts of its anatomy. These are: (from top left) the head and rostrum, the pointed tubular hairs at the end of the femora (legs), hooks and pads on the on the terminal tarsus, and the antennae. The antennae segements are made up of telescoped rings. This herbivorous insect is found on nettles.
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! EN_90227652_0001 SCI
PHOTO: EAST NEWS/SCIENCE PHOTO LIBRARY Jumping plant louse nymph (Trioza urticae). Artwork of various stages in the development of a jumping plant louse. The drawing at top left is of eggs on the underside of a nettle leaf. Inside the eggs are developed larvae with red eyes. Below this is a drawing of a newly hatched nypmh on a nettle leaf. The drawing at top right is a side view of hatched nypmph and below this is a top view. The nymph legs have terminal suction pads and tubular hairs. The main drawing is a mature nymph. It has wing buds and the underside of its head supports piercing mouthparts for sucking sap. This species lives exclusively on nettles.
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! EN_90228785_0001 SCI
PHOTO: EAST NEWS/SCIENCE PHOTO LIBRARY Leafhopper feeding. Artwork of a leafhopper (Eupteryx aurata) with its mouthparts inserted in the phloem of a nettle leaf vein (Urtica sp.). The leafhopper is drinking the sap from the nettle leaf.
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! EN_90232097_0001 SCI
PHOTO: EAST NEWS/SCIENCE PHOTO LIBRARY Nettle aphid (Microlophium carnosum), artwork. This is a winged adult female. It is able to reproduce by parthenogenesis (asexually), giving birth to pregnant offspring. This phenomenon is known as telescoping generations. The generation of young produced by winged adults are able to reproduce sexually. The red eyes of its young can be seen inside the body.
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! EN_90233466_0001 SCI
PHOTO: EAST NEWS/SCIENCE PHOTO LIBRARY Parasitic fly (Phryxe sp.), artwork. This species of tachinid fly is often seen lingering around nettle foliage (Urtica sp.) because it lays its eggs on the larvae of species of butterflies and (Lepidoptera). The fly larva bores its way through the skin and becomes an endoparasitoid. The fly is characterised by a hairy body.
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! EN_90233481_0001 SCI
PHOTO: EAST NEWS/SCIENCE PHOTO LIBRARY Parasitised aphid (Microlophium carnosum) on a nettle leaf, artwork. The dead aphid has been parasitised by the endoparasitoid larva of a braconid wasp. The adult wasp lays its egg inside the aphid and the larva consumes its host. After the aphid is consumed its skin becomes indurated and forms a so-called 'mummy'. The adult wasp has exited from the hole in the aphid's abdomen. This is characteristic of braconid wasps of the genus Aphidus. Endoparasitoid relationships are utilised in organic farming techniques as a form of biological pest control.
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