poniedziałek, 23 lipca 2018
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Botanika (88)

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Zdjęcia

! EN_90258569_0004 SCI
PHOTO: EAST NEWS/SCIENCE PHOTO LIBRARY Flower pollen. Computer artwork of pollen grains from a flower (seen in background). The outer wall (exine) of each pollen grain is highly sculpted to aid the dispersal of the pollen grains. A flowering plant produces many pollen grains which need to be dispersed. This dispersal may happen as the spiky exine sticks to a pollinator such as a bee. Each pollen grain contains a male gamete (reproductive cell) that is intended to fertilise the ovule or egg (female gamete) of another plant of that species, forming the seed for a new plant.
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! EN_90253731_0001 SCI
PHOTO: EAST NEWS/SCIENCE PHOTO LIBRARY Creeping bellflower. Computer artwork of creeping bellflower plants (Campanula rapunculoides) showing their root systems in the soil. This plant is considered a weed due to its abilityto spread wuickly overa alrge area through its roots. The larger roots of this plant are edible.
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! EN_90253734_0001 SCI
PHOTO: EAST NEWS/SCIENCE PHOTO LIBRARY Creeping buttercup. Computer artwork of creeping buttercup plants (Ranunculus repens) showing their root systems in the soil. This plant is considered a weed due to its ability to spread quickly over a large area through its roots.
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! EN_90254766_0001 SCI
PHOTO: EAST NEWS/SCIENCE PHOTO LIBRARY Dandelion. Computer artwork of a dandelion plant (Taraxacum vulgare) showing its roots in the soil.
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! EN_90258032_0001 SCI
PHOTO: EAST NEWS/SCIENCE PHOTO LIBRARY Field bindweed. Computer artwork of field bindweed plants (Convolvulus arvensis) showing their root systems in the soil. This plant is considered a weed due to its ability to spread quickly over a large area through its roots.
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! EN_90252675_0001 SCI
PHOTO: EAST NEWS/SCIENCE PHOTO LIBRARY Common couch. Computer artwork of the common couch grass (Elytrigia repens) showing its roots and rhizomes in the soil. Rhizomes are underground stems that help the plant to spread.
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! EN_90253741_0001 SCI
PHOTO: EAST NEWS/SCIENCE PHOTO LIBRARY Creeping thistle. Computer artwork of a creeping thistle plant (Cirsium arvense) showing its roots in the soil. Thistles are considered weeds due to their ability to spread quickly over a large area through their roots.
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! EN_90261507_0001 SCI
PHOTO: EAST NEWS/SCIENCE PHOTO LIBRARY Ground-elder. Computer artwork of a ground-elder plant (Aegopodium podagraria), showing its root system in the soil. Ground-elder is considered a weed due to its ability to spread quickly over a large area through its roots.
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! EN_90280422_0005 SCI
PHOTO: EAST NEWS/SCIENCE PHOTO LIBRARY Stinging nettle. Computer artwork of a stinging nettle (Urtica dioica), showing its root system in the soil.
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! EN_90249131_0002 SCI
PHOTO: EAST NEWS/SCIENCE PHOTO LIBRARY Bread wheat (Triticum aestivum). Watercolour artwork illustrating bread wheat. Bread wheat is one of the most widely cultivated cereal crops and has many different varieties and forms. It is mainly grown for human and animal consumption as it contains a high perecentage of carbohydrate, a considerable quantity of protein, some fats and some vitamins.
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! EN_90250644_0001 SCI
PHOTO: EAST NEWS/SCIENCE PHOTO LIBRARY Cassava (Manihot esculenta). Watercolour artwork of a cassava plant. This perennial shrub is cultivated for its edible tubers which are a rich source of carbohydrate. Apart from this they have very little nutritional value, although the leaves of the plant are a rich source of protein. Like the potato, the cassava originates in South America where it is still a popular crop. It is also grown throughout Africa and Asia. Cassava is best eaten immediately after harvesting after which it is stored in water until cooking, to prevent the flavour from spoiling.
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! EN_90267327_0001 SCI
PHOTO: EAST NEWS/SCIENCE PHOTO LIBRARY Maize (Zea mays). Watercolour artwork illustrating stages of growth of maize. The stem at the top is topped by spikelets of flowers, arranged on a raceme. Lower down are the ripening fruiting bodies called cobs, covered in individual yellow kernels, which are surrounded by leaf sheaths called husks. The fibrous structures at the tips of each cob are the female stigmas which are designed to catch pollen grains. Maize is one of the world's most important crops. It can be eaten as corn on the cob, sweetcorn or popcorn It can also be ground down to produce flour, distilled to make a whiskey and extracts can be used in the production of cooking oil and margarine. Maize is a good source of potassium and Vitamin A, and is high in fibre.
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! EN_90273867_0001 SCI
PHOTO: EAST NEWS/SCIENCE PHOTO LIBRARY Potato (Solanum tuberosum). Watercolour artwork illustrating a potato plant. The plant belongs to the Solanaceae or nightshade family and originates from the Andes region of South America. The purple and white flowers (top left) are pollinated by insects and form small green fruit which produce seeds. However, the plants are grown for their potatoes (bottom), the edible tubers of the plant. Potatoes form an important source of carbohydrates in many diets. The 'skin' of the potato is also a good source of dietary fibre, essential for efficient digestion.
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! EN_90276891_0002 SCI
PHOTO: EAST NEWS/SCIENCE PHOTO LIBRARY Rye (Secale cereale). Watercolour artwork illustrating rye. Rye is a hardy cereal crop that is native to western Asia. It can grow up to 1.8 metres tall. Rye is mostly used as livestock food and in bread making, where it is mixed with wheat.
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! EN_90279690_0001 SCI
PHOTO: EAST NEWS/SCIENCE PHOTO LIBRARY Soybean (Glycine max). Watercolour artwork illustrating a soybean plant including a flower and fruits. The ripening (green) and ripened (brown) pods of this plant contain soya beans, an excellent source of dietary fibre.
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! EN_90285176_0001 SCI
PHOTO: EAST NEWS/SCIENCE PHOTO LIBRARY Wild rice (Zizania aquatica). Watercolour artwork illustrating wild rice, a tall marsh grass with edible grains. Despite its common name, wild rice is not closely related to the cultivated rice plant, Oryza satvia.
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! EN_90285718_0001 SCI
PHOTO: EAST NEWS/SCIENCE PHOTO LIBRARY Yam (Dioscorea villosa). Watercolour artwork illustrating a yam. The tuber of the plant is edible but must be prepared and cooked thoroughly to remove toxins. Its consumption is common throughout West Africa. As it can be grown in harsh conditions and stored for several months, it is a valuable food source during times of food scarcity.
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! EN_90273547_0001 SCI
PHOTO: EAST NEWS/SCIENCE PHOTO LIBRARY Pollen grains, computer artwork. The characteristic surface of pollen grains is used by botanists to recognise and classify plants. Each pollen grain contains a male gamete (reproductive cell) that is intended to fertilise an egg or ovule (female gamete), and initiate the formation of a seed for a new plant.
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! EN_90254722_0001 SCI
PHOTO: EAST NEWS/SCIENCE PHOTO LIBRARY Damaged stinging nettle, artwork. Various views of a stinging nettle damaged by the weevil (Ceuthorhynchus pollinaris). At left are several enlarged views of sections of damaged stems and petioles (leaf stems). In spring, the female weevil makes holes in the stems with the mandibles located at the end of her rostrum. Her eggs are then laid inside the holes. Sections showing the eggs are at top left and centre left. The weevil also feeds on the leaves (centre right). At far right is an enlarged view of a larva inside the stem cavity.
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! EN_90274299_0001 SCI
PHOTO: EAST NEWS/SCIENCE PHOTO LIBRARY Proso millet (Panicum miliaceum). Watercolour artwork illustrating stages of growth of proso millet. The stem at left is topped by spikelets of flowers, arranged on a raceme. The stem at right shows the development of grains. It is topped by ripening fruits, each containing one seed. Millet has been used as a food for both man and domestic animals since the Stone Age. It is an important crop in the tropics and warm temperate regions because it tolerates drought and grows well in poor soil. It takes only two to three months to produce its carbohydrate rich seed.
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