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Genetyka (1157)

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! EN_01314036_0250 SPL
Sperm fertilizing egg, computer illustration. The sperm has an oval head and a hair-like tail which it beats with a whiplash motion to swim. The human female usually produces a single large egg from the ovary, while the male releases some 300 million much smaller sperm. The sperm travel through the uterus (womb) and up the fallopian tubes to reach the egg. The sperm must penetrate a thick layer around the egg; this penetration is aided by enzymes contained in the sperm's head. Only one sperm can fuse with the egg nucleus. Fertilisation enables male and female genetic material to be shared.
SPECIAL RATES FOR EDITORIAL AND BOOKS RF RATES FOR OTHER USE
! EN_01314036_0251 SPL
Sperm fertilizing egg, computer illustration. The sperm has an oval head and a hair-like tail which it beats with a whiplash motion to swim. The human female usually produces a single large egg from the ovary, while the male releases some 300 million much smaller sperm. The sperm travel through the uterus (womb) and up the fallopian tubes to reach the egg. The sperm must penetrate a thick layer around the egg; this penetration is aided by enzymes contained in the sperm's head. Only one sperm can fuse with the egg nucleus. Fertilisation enables male and female genetic material to be shared.
SPECIAL RATES FOR EDITORIAL AND BOOKS RF RATES FOR OTHER USE
! EN_01314036_0252 SPL
Sperm fertilizing egg, computer illustration. The sperm has an oval head and a hair-like tail which it beats with a whiplash motion to swim. The human female usually produces a single large egg from the ovary, while the male releases some 300 million much smaller sperm. The sperm travel through the uterus (womb) and up the fallopian tubes to reach the egg. The sperm must penetrate a thick layer around the egg; this penetration is aided by enzymes contained in the sperm's head. Only one sperm can fuse with the egg nucleus. Fertilisation enables male and female genetic material to be shared.
SPECIAL RATES FOR EDITORIAL AND BOOKS RF RATES FOR OTHER USE
! EN_01314036_0253 SPL
Sperm fertilizing egg, computer illustration. The sperm has an oval head and a hair-like tail which it beats with a whiplash motion to swim. The human female usually produces a single large egg from the ovary, while the male releases some 300 million much smaller sperm. The sperm travel through the uterus (womb) and up the fallopian tubes to reach the egg. The sperm must penetrate a thick layer around the egg; this penetration is aided by enzymes contained in the sperm's head. Only one sperm can fuse with the egg nucleus. Fertilisation enables male and female genetic material to be shared.
SPECIAL RATES FOR EDITORIAL AND BOOKS RF RATES FOR OTHER USE
! EN_01314036_0254 SPL
Sperm fertilizing egg, computer illustration. The sperm has an oval head and a hair-like tail which it beats with a whiplash motion to swim. The human female usually produces a single large egg from the ovary, while the male releases some 300 million much smaller sperm. The sperm travel through the uterus (womb) and up the fallopian tubes to reach the egg. The sperm must penetrate a thick layer around the egg; this penetration is aided by enzymes contained in the sperm's head. Only one sperm can fuse with the egg nucleus. Fertilisation enables male and female genetic material to be shared.
Model Released SPECIAL RATES FOR EDITORIAL AND BOOKS RF RATES FOR OTHER USE
! EN_01314036_0255 SPL
Human ovum, or egg, surrounded by numerous spermatozoa, computer illustration. In fertilisation, only a single sperm may successfully penetrate the ovum to fuse with the female nucleus. Barriers to be overcome include layers of follicular cells surrounding the ovum (corona radiata) and an underlying glycoprotein membrane, the zona pellucida. The membrane is digested by enzymes released from the acrosome, a cap on the head of the sperm: subsequent rapid chemical changes in the zona pellucida prevent competing sperm from entering.
Model Released SPECIAL RATES FOR EDITORIAL AND BOOKS RF RATES FOR OTHER USE
! EN_01314036_0256 SPL
Human ovum, or egg, surrounded by numerous spermatozoa, computer illustration. In fertilisation, only a single sperm may successfully penetrate the ovum to fuse with the female nucleus. Barriers to be overcome include layers of follicular cells surrounding the ovum (corona radiata) and an underlying glycoprotein membrane, the zona pellucida. The membrane is digested by enzymes released from the acrosome, a cap on the head of the sperm: subsequent rapid chemical changes in the zona pellucida prevent competing sperm from entering.
Model Released SPECIAL RATES FOR EDITORIAL AND BOOKS RF RATES FOR OTHER USE
! EN_01314036_0272 SPL
Human ovum, or egg, surrounded by numerous spermatozoa, computer illustration. In fertilisation, only a single sperm may successfully penetrate the ovum to fuse with the female nucleus. Barriers to be overcome include layers of follicular cells surrounding the ovum (corona radiata) and an underlying glycoprotein membrane, the zona pellucida. The membrane is digested by enzymes released from the acrosome, a cap on the head of the sperm: subsequent rapid chemical changes in the zona pellucida prevent competing sperm from entering.
Model Released SPECIAL RATES FOR EDITORIAL AND BOOKS RF RATES FOR OTHER USE
! EN_01314036_0273 SPL
Human ovum, or egg, surrounded by numerous spermatozoa, computer illustration. In fertilisation, only a single sperm may successfully penetrate the ovum to fuse with the female nucleus. Barriers to be overcome include layers of follicular cells surrounding the ovum (corona radiata) and an underlying glycoprotein membrane, the zona pellucida. The membrane is digested by enzymes released from the acrosome, a cap on the head of the sperm: subsequent rapid chemical changes in the zona pellucida prevent competing sperm from entering.
Model Released SPECIAL RATES FOR EDITORIAL AND BOOKS RF RATES FOR OTHER USE
EN_00962647_0476 VAL
Cloning word cloud
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EN_00962647_2477 VAL
dna
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EN_00962647_3094 VAL
Sci fi abstract
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EN_00962647_5201 VAL
helix
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EN_00962661_2992 VAL
DNA Research
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EN_00958165_5846 PHO
Monoclonal antibodies, shown here binding to a cell, are monospecific antibodies (these are antibodies that have an affinity for the same antigen) - mAB or moAb, as they are abbreviated, are the same because they are created by identical immune cells that are clones of a unique parent cell. Monoclonal antibodies are created to specifically bind to a substance so they can detect or purify that particular substance. In medications the non-proprietary drug name ends in -mab. Typically, monoclonal antibodies are produced by fusing myeloma cells with the spleen cells from a mouse and recently, as a result of advances, from rabbit B-cells. Monoclonals can be used as therapies for various serious diseases such as rheumatoid arthritis, multiple sclerosis and different cancers.
EN_00958165_5847 PHO
Monoclonal antibodies, shown here binding to a cell, are monospecific antibodies (these are antibodies that have an affinity for the same antigen) - mAB or moAb, as they are abbreviated, are the same because they are created by identical immune cells that are clones of a unique parent cell. Monoclonal antibodies are created to specifically bind to a substance so they can detect or purify that particular substance. In medications the non-proprietary drug name ends in -mab. Typically, monoclonal antibodies are produced by fusing myeloma cells with the spleen cells from a mouse and recently, as a result of advances, from rabbit B-cells. Monoclonals can be used as therapies for various serious diseases such as rheumatoid arthritis, multiple sclerosis and different cancers.
EN_00958165_5848 PHO
Monoclonal antibodies, shown here binding to a cell, are monospecific antibodies (these are antibodies that have an affinity for the same antigen) - mAB or moAb, as they are abbreviated, are the same because they are created by identical immune cells that are clones of a unique parent cell. Monoclonal antibodies are created to specifically bind to a substance so they can detect or purify that particular substance. In medications the non-proprietary drug name ends in -mab. Typically, monoclonal antibodies are produced by fusing myeloma cells with the spleen cells from a mouse and recently, as a result of advances, from rabbit B-cells. Monoclonals can be used as therapies for various serious diseases such as rheumatoid arthritis, multiple sclerosis and different cancers.
EN_00958165_5849 PHO
Monoclonal antibodies, shown here binding to a cell, are monospecific antibodies (these are antibodies that have an affinity for the same antigen) - mAB or moAb, as they are abbreviated, are the same because they are created by identical immune cells that are clones of a unique parent cell. Monoclonal antibodies are created to specifically bind to a substance so they can detect or purify that particular substance. In medications the non-proprietary drug name ends in -mab. Typically, monoclonal antibodies are produced by fusing myeloma cells with the spleen cells from a mouse and recently, as a result of advances, from rabbit B-cells. Monoclonals can be used as therapies for various serious diseases such as rheumatoid arthritis, multiple sclerosis and different cancers.
EN_00958165_5850 PHO
Monoclonal antibodies, shown here binding to a cell, are monospecific antibodies (these are antibodies that have an affinity for the same antigen) - mAB or moAb, as they are abbreviated, are the same because they are created by identical immune cells that are clones of a unique parent cell. Monoclonal antibodies are created to specifically bind to a substance so they can detect or purify that particular substance. In medications the non-proprietary drug name ends in -mab. Typically, monoclonal antibodies are produced by fusing myeloma cells with the spleen cells from a mouse and recently, as a result of advances, from rabbit B-cells. Monoclonals can be used as therapies for various serious diseases such as rheumatoid arthritis, multiple sclerosis and different cancers.
EN_00958165_5851 PHO
Monoclonal antibodies, shown here binding to a cell, are monospecific antibodies (these are antibodies that have an affinity for the same antigen) - mAB or moAb, as they are abbreviated, are the same because they are created by identical immune cells that are clones of a unique parent cell. Monoclonal antibodies are created to specifically bind to a substance so they can detect or purify that particular substance. In medications the non-proprietary drug name ends in -mab. Typically, monoclonal antibodies are produced by fusing myeloma cells with the spleen cells from a mouse and recently, as a result of advances, from rabbit B-cells. Monoclonals can be used as therapies for various serious diseases such as rheumatoid arthritis, multiple sclerosis and different cancers.

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