środa, 18 października 2017
zamknij [x]
do:

Fizyka (594)

272829
... z 30

Zdjęcia

! EN_90246558_0001 SCI
PHOTO: EAST NEWS/SCIENCE PHOTO LIBRARY Beryllium atom. Computer-digitised illustration of a single atom of Beryllium. This is a typical traditional diagram of atomic structure, showing electrons orbiting around a central nucleus. Beryllium contains four electrons, and a nucleus which has four protons and five neutrons (unseen). The number of electrically positive protons balance the number of negative electrons. This image is highly schematic, as it is now thought that electron orbits are more eccentric and they inhabit a 'probability cloud' rather than moving in well-defined circular orbits (often called the Bohr model).
Wysoka rozdzielczosc dostepna na zamowienie
! EN_90246558_0002 SCI
PHOTO: EAST NEWS/SCIENCE PHOTO LIBRARY Beryllium atom. Computer-digitised illustration of a single atom of Beryllium. This is a typical traditional diagram of atomic structure, showing electrons orbiting around a central nucleus. Beryllium contains four electrons, and a nucleus which has four protons and five neutrons (unseen). The number of electrically positive protons balance the number of negative electrons. This image is highly schematic, as it is now thought that electron orbits are more eccentric and they inhabit a 'probability cloud' rather than moving in well-defined circular orbits (often called the Bohr model).
Wysoka rozdzielczosc dostepna na zamowienie
! EN_90246558_0003 SCI
PHOTO: EAST NEWS/SCIENCE PHOTO LIBRARY Beryllium atom. Computer-digitised illustration of a single atom of Beryllium. This is a typical traditional diagram of atomic structure, showing electrons orbiting around a central nucleus. Beryllium contains four electrons, and a nucleus which has four protons and five neutrons (unseen). The number of electrically positive protons balance the number of negative electrons. This image is highly schematic, as it is now thought that electron orbits are more eccentric and they inhabit a 'probability cloud' rather than moving in well-defined circular orbits (often called the Bohr model).
Wysoka rozdzielczosc dostepna na zamowienie
! EN_90252992_0001 SCI
PHOTO: EAST NEWS/SCIENCE PHOTO LIBRARY Atomic orbitals. Computer display of an electronic orbital of the hydrogen atom. The orbital shown here is known as 3d and it is formed by four symmetric lobes, two purple-blue and two red- green, seen sliced in the cartesian plane xy, with the nucleus at the centre of the frame. According to the atomic quantum theory it is not possible to specify a trajectory for the electrons moving around the nucleus. The quantum theory introduces instead the concept of orbitals as regions where there is a given probability of finding the electrons. The coloured bands in the lobes show different probability levels; the probability decreases when moving away from the nucleus.
Wysoka rozdzielczosc dostepna na zamowienie
! EN_90256620_0001 SCI
PHOTO: EAST NEWS/SCIENCE PHOTO LIBRARY Atomic orbitals. Computer display of an electronic orbital of the hydrogen atom. The orbital shown here is known as 3d and it is formed by four symmetric lobes, two blue and two red-orange green, seen sliced in the cartesian plane xy, with the nucleus at the centre of the frame. According to the atomic quantum theory it is not possible to specify a trajectory for the electrons moving around the nucleus. The quantum theory introduces instead the concept of orbitals as regions where there is a given probability of finding the electrons. The coloured bands in the lobes show different probability levels; the probability decreases when moving away from the nucleus.
Wysoka rozdzielczosc dostepna na zamowienie
! EN_90261178_0001 SCI
PHOTO: EAST NEWS/SCIENCE PHOTO LIBRARY Computer montage featuring a map of Earth and the mushroom cloud of an atomic explosion.
Wysoka rozdzielczosc dostepna na zamowienie
! EN_90261177_0001 SCI
PHOTO: EAST NEWS/SCIENCE PHOTO LIBRARY Electron orbits. Computer graphic illustration of four electrons in orbit around an atomic nucleus. This image is highly schematic, as it is now thought that electrons inhabit a fuzzy 'probability cloud' around the nucleus. The concept illustrated here pre- dates quantum theory, and shows the electrons in well- defined circular orbits (often called the Bohr Model).
Wysoka rozdzielczosc dostepna na zamowienie
! EN_90281054_0001 SCI
PHOTO: EAST NEWS/SCIENCE PHOTO LIBRARY Superconducting fulleride: computer graphics representation of the surface of 'potassium buckide' (K3C60), a crystal produced by doping C60 (Buckminsterfullerene) with potassium. K3C60 consists of a face centred cubic structure of Buckyballs (grey), with potassium ions (blue) filling the cavities between the 'balls. In 1991, researchers at AT & T Bell Laboratories discovered that potassium buckide became superconducting when cooled below 18 K. C60 films have also been grown on gallium arsenide crystals, indicating possible applications in fabricating microelectronic circuits.
Wysoka rozdzielczosc dostepna na zamowienie
! EN_90226968_0001 SCI
PHOTO: EAST NEWS/SCIENCE PHOTO LIBRARY Illustration of an electrical discharge between two metal objects.
Wysoka rozdzielczosc dostepna na zamowienie
! EN_90226968_0002 SCI
PHOTO: EAST NEWS/SCIENCE PHOTO LIBRARY Illustration of an electrical discharge between two metal objects.
Wysoka rozdzielczosc dostepna na zamowienie
! EN_90246549_0003 SCI
PHOTO: EAST NEWS/SCIENCE PHOTO LIBRARY Computer graphics representation of the crystal structure of one of the new generation of high- temperature superconductors - bismuth-strontium- calcium-copper oxide. Intense worldwide research into high-temperature superconductors was sparked in early 1987 by the discovery of superconducting properties at around 90 K in a ceramic, yttrium- barium-copper oxide. The new bismuth-based superconductor was developed in Japan in 1988 through endeavours to attain superconducting behaviour at a higher temperature (around 130 K) using cheaper components than the expensive rare earth metals such as yttrium which were constituents of the original superconductors. Refs: Science, Vol 239, pp1015-1017, 1988
Wysoka rozdzielczosc dostepna na zamowienie
! EN_90255251_0001 SCI
PHOTO: EAST NEWS/SCIENCE PHOTO LIBRARY Diagram of the structure of the proton (or neutron). A proton consists of three smaller, fundamental particles called quarks, which are bound together by the strong nuclear force. Protons consist of 2 'up' quarks (blue) & 1 'down' quark (green). Neutrons consist of 2 'down' quarks & 1 'up' quark. Quarks are always found either in triplets (as in the proton & neutron) or in pairs of a quark & antiquark. Attempts to isolate individual quarks have been unsuccessful, & some theorists believe that the nature of the strong nuclear force makes the existence of free quarks impossible.
Wysoka rozdzielczosc dostepna na zamowienie
! EN_90246549_0001 SCI
PHOTO: EAST NEWS/SCIENCE PHOTO LIBRARY Molecular computer graphic showing the crystal structure of one of the new generation of high- temperature superconductors - yttrium-barium- copper oxide (Y-Ba2-Cu3-O7-x). Discovered in 1987, the new superconducting ceramic materials are expected to lead to a technological revolution, & are the subject of intensive worldwide research. The picture highlights the square-pyramidal (red) and square-planar (green) coordination of copper by oxygen ions in this orthorhombic structure. Copper atoms are white. Yttrium ions are the yellow spheres, and barium ions the blue spheres. (Further information in Nature, 28 May 1987, page 310).
Wysoka rozdzielczosc dostepna na zamowienie
! EN_90275338_0001 SCI
PHOTO: EAST NEWS/SCIENCE PHOTO LIBRARY Illustration of light refraction: three beams of coloured light pass through a diverging lens (biconcave), then a converging lens (biconvex) before further refraction through a prism.
Wysoka rozdzielczosc dostepna na zamowienie
Chcesz więcej zdjęć?
Użyj wyszukiwarki.

góra

272829
... z 30