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Astronomia (437)

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EN_00958297_0960 PHO
Illustration showing the core, mantle and crust of Uranus. The standard model of Uranus's structure is that it consists of three layers: a rocky core in the center, an icy mantle in the middle and an outer gaseous hydrogen/helium envelope. The rocky core of Uranus is relatively small, with a mass of 0.55 Earth masses and a radius less than 20 percent of Uranus's; the mantle is about 13.4 Earth masses, and comprises the bulk of the planet; the upper atmosphere weighs only that of 0.5 Earth masses and extends for the last 20 percent of Uranus's radius.
EN_00958297_0961 PHO
Illustration showing the core, mantle and crust of Venus. At the center of Venus is a primarily solid iron core, which underlies a thick mantle made mainly of silicate minerals. On top of this is a very thin crust, which is only around 30 kilometers thick (compared to a maximum of around 70 kilometers for Earth's crust). Venus also has a thick, acidic atmosphere, which traps the heat of the Sun (a runaway green house effect). This makes Venus the hottest planet in the solar system, with surface temperatures reaching over 400 degrees Celsius.
EN_00958297_0962 PHO
Illustration showing the core, mantle and crust of Venus. At the center of Venus is a primarily solid iron core, which underlies a thick mantle made mainly of silicate minerals. On top of this is a very thin crust, which is only around 30 kilometers thick (compared to a maximum of around 70 kilometers for Earth's crust). Venus also has a thick, acidic atmosphere, which traps the heat of the Sun (a runaway green house effect). This makes Venus the hottest planet in the solar system, with surface temperatures reaching over 400 degrees Celsius.
EN_00958297_0963 PHO
Artist's impression of one of the two Voyager spacecraft during its encounter with the planet Saturn. The broad white line shows the spacecraft's path through the solar system from Earth, via Jupiter, to Saturn. Also visible are (from left to right) Mars, the Sun, Mercury and Venus. Voyager 1 was launched on 5th September 1977 and flew past Saturn on 12th November 1980. Its sister spacecraft, Voyager 2, launched earlier on 20th August 1977, encountered Saturn several months after Voyager 1 in August 1981. Both spacecraft returned valuable information on Saturn and it's ring system and satellites.
EN_00958297_0964 PHO
Artist's impression of one of the two Voyager spacecraft during its encounter with the planet Saturn. The broad white line shows the spacecraft's path through the solar system from Earth, via Jupiter, to Saturn. Also visible are (from left to right) Mars, the Sun, Mercury and Venus. Voyager 1 was launched on 5th September 1977 and flew past Saturn on 12th November 1980. Its sister spacecraft, Voyager 2, launched earlier on 20th August 1977, encountered Saturn several months after Voyager 1 in August 1981. Both spacecraft returned valuable information on Saturn and it's ring system and satellites.
EN_00958297_0997 PHO
The Milky Way and Stars of constellation Sagittarius above stone formations in the heart of the African Sahara, Tassili National Park, Southern Algeria.
EN_00958297_1014 PHO
The familiar figure of constellation Orion stands very different in these two images. The image at right is taken from the northern hemisphere winter in Iran Alborz Mountains while the image on the left shows the coast Tasmania-Australia nearly at the same time of year.
EN_00958297_1015 PHO
The familiar figure of constellation Orion stands very different in these two images. The image at right is taken from the northern hemisphere winter in Iran Alborz Mountains while the image on the left shows the coast Tasmania-Australia nearly at the same time of year.
EN_00958297_1020 PHO
Sirius is the brightest star in night sky. It is also the alpha star of constellation Canis Major or Big Dog, a winter constellation from the Northern Hemisphere.
EN_00958297_1021 PHO
Sirius is the brightest star in night sky. It is also the alpha star of constellation Canis Major or Big Dog, a winter constellation from the Northern Hemisphere.
EN_00958128_0078 BIO
Photomontage/carte: constellation et lettres grecques. La Croix du Sud est la plus petite constellation du ciel mais c'est l'une des plus celcbres. Elle est representee sur de nombreux drapeaux nationaux et a servi de guide aux premicrs navigateurs circumterrestres. Elle n'est visible que depuis l'Hemisphcre Sud. On remarque r sa gauche le "Sac r Charbon"; un nuage de poussicres interstellaire.
EN_00958128_4756 BIO
Photo et carte celeste d'Orion avec denominations grecques. Situee sur l'Equateur Celeste, la constellation d'Orion est visible des deux hemisphcres. On peut l'admirer en hiver en Europe. Orion representait un chasseur chez les Anciens Grecs. On remarque sur l'image la nebuleuse d'Orion (M42), ainsi que la "Boucle de Barnard" et la minuscule "Tete de Cheval".
EN_00958128_4763 BIO
Carte et denominations grecques. Le Sagittaire representait un Centaure bandant un arc pour les anciens Grecs. Cette constellation est l'une des plus belle du ciel car elle est traversee par la Voie Lactee. C'est dans cette direction que se situe le centre galactique (le coeur de notre galaxie). Le Sagittaire est visible en ete en Europe , sur l'horizon sud. La carte montre les differents objets qu'elle contient (amas, nebuleuses, etc.).
EN_00958128_4764 BIO
Carte et denominations grecques. La figure celeste du Scorpion est connue depuis la plus haute antiquite. Elle represente l'animal en entier, avec son dard et ses pinces. Le scorpion apparait trcs bas sur l'horizon sud en Europe au debut de l'ete.
EN_00957845_6212 BIO
Photomontage constellation du Cygne/carte. La constellation du Cygne culmine au zenih en Europe durant les nuits d'ete. Traversee par la Voie Lactee, c'est une des belles constellation du ciel boreal. On distingue en haut r gauche l'etoile Deneb et la nebuleuse North America ( NGC 7000 ), et prcs du bord gauche de l'image les restes de supernova appelees "dentelles du Cygne". Cette image a ete realisee au moyen d'un objectif de 50 mm.
EN_00957730_0326 PHO
Artwork of Earth against a starry background as seen from just above the surface of the moon.
EN_00957730_0788 PHO
The Milky Way in constellation Scorpius and Sagittarius as seen from the heart of African Sahara in the Tassili National park, a World Heritage site in Southern Algeria. The Constellation figures have been illustrated into the image.
EN_00957730_0803 PHO
Man viewing constellations Scorpius and Sagittarius through his telescope. Constellation figures have been illustrated into the image.
EN_00952097_2296 IKO
Yellow supernova exploding in outer space
EN_90286391_0542 PHO
Milankovitch cycles are the collective effect of changes in the Earth's movements upon its climate, named after Serbian civil engineer and mathematician Milutin Milankovic. The eccentricity, axial tilt, and precession of the Earth's orbit vary in several patterns, resulting in 100,000-year ice age cycles of the Quaternary glaciation over the last few million years. The Earth's axis completes one full cycle of precession approximately every 26,000 years. At the same time, the elliptical orbit rotates, more slowly, leading to a 21,000-year cycle between the seasons and the orbit. In addition, the angle between Earth's rotational axis and the normal to the plane of its orbit moves from 22.1 degrees to 24.5 degrees and back again on a 41,000-year cycle. Currently, this angle is 23.44 degrees and is decreasing.

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