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Biologia (bakteria, wirus) (389)

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! EN_90258661_0004 SCI
PHOTO: EAST NEWS/SCIENCE PHOTO LIBRARY Flu virus particle. Computer artwork of an influenza (flu) virus particle. At the core of the virus is RNA (ribonucleic acid, red) genetic material. This is surrounded by a nucleocapsid and a lipid envelope (white). In the envelope are two types of protein spike, haemagglutinin (H) and neuraminidase (N), which determine the strain of virus. These are used for recognising and binding to the host cell.
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! EN_90258664_0001 SCI
PHOTO: EAST NEWS/SCIENCE PHOTO LIBRARY Flu viruses in the throat. Computer artwork of influenza (flu) viruses (ovals) in a human throat. The lining of the throat includes cells that are covered in cilia (small hair-like projections). These cilia normally move rhythmically to help expel dust, micro-organisms and other particles. However, a large number of viruses in the throat can prevent the cilia from working properly, allowing the viruses to infect the cells of the throat and lungs.
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! EN_90258661_0002 SCI
PHOTO: EAST NEWS/SCIENCE PHOTO LIBRARY Flu virus particle. Computer artwork of an influenza (flu) A virus particle (virion). The virus consists of a core of RNA (ribonucleic acid) genetic material surrounded by a protein coat (pink). Embedded in the coat are surface proteins (spikes). There are two types of surface protein, haemagglutinin and neuraminidase, and each exists in several subtypes. Both surface proteins are associated with the pathogenicity of a virus. Haemagglutinin binds to host cells, allowing the virus to enter them and replicate. Neuraminidase allows the new particles to exit the host after replication.
Wysoka rozdzielczosc dostepna na zamowienie
! EN_90258661_0003 SCI
PHOTO: EAST NEWS/SCIENCE PHOTO LIBRARY Flu virus particle. Computer artwork of an influenza (flu) A virus particle (virion). The virus consists of a core of RNA (ribonucleic acid) genetic material surrounded by a protein coat (pink). Embedded in the coat are surface proteins (spikes). There are two types of surface protein, haemagglutinin and neuraminidase, and each exists in several subtypes. Both surface proteins are associated with the pathogenicity of a virus. Haemagglutinin binds to host cells, allowing the virus to enter them and replicate. Neuraminidase allows the new particles to exit the host after replication.
Wysoka rozdzielczosc dostepna na zamowienie
! EN_90258663_0001 SCI
PHOTO: EAST NEWS/SCIENCE PHOTO LIBRARY Flu virus particles. Computer artwork of influenza (flu) A virus particles (virions). Each virus consists of a core of RNA (ribonucleic acid) genetic material surrounded by a protein coat (pink). Embedded in the coat are surface proteins (spikes). There are two types of surface protein, haemagglutinin and neuraminidase, and each exists in several subtypes. Both surface proteins are associated with the pathogenicity of a virus. Haemagglutinin binds to host cells, allowing the virus to enter them and replicate. Neuraminidase allows the new particles to exit the host after replication.
Wysoka rozdzielczosc dostepna na zamowienie
! EN_90258663_0002 SCI
PHOTO: EAST NEWS/SCIENCE PHOTO LIBRARY Flu virus particles. Computer artwork of influenza (flu) A virus particles (virions). Each virus consists of a core of RNA (ribonucleic acid) genetic material surrounded by a protein coat (pink). Embedded in the coat are surface proteins (spikes). There are two types of surface protein, haemagglutinin and neuraminidase, and each exists in several subtypes. Both surface proteins are associated with the pathogenicity of a virus. Haemagglutinin binds to host cells, allowing the virus to enter them and replicate. Neuraminidase allows the new particles to exit the host after replication.
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! EN_90261625_0010 SCI
PHOTO: EAST NEWS/SCIENCE PHOTO LIBRARY H1N1 flu virus particle. Computer artwork of an H1N1 influenza (flu) A virus particle (virion). In the particle's lipid envelope are two types of protein spike, haemagglutinin (H, tri-lobed spikes) and neuraminidase (N, squares), which determine the strain of virus. These are used for recognising and binding to the host cell.
Wysoka rozdzielczosc dostepna na zamowienie
! EN_90261625_0011 SCI
PHOTO: EAST NEWS/SCIENCE PHOTO LIBRARY H1N1 flu virus particle. Computer artwork of an H1N1 influenza (flu) A virus particle (virion). In the particle's lipid envelope are two types of protein spike, haemagglutinin (H, tri-lobed spikes) and neuraminidase (N, squares), which determine the strain of virus. These are used for recognising and binding to the host cell.
Wysoka rozdzielczosc dostepna na zamowienie
! EN_90261625_0012 SCI
PHOTO: EAST NEWS/SCIENCE PHOTO LIBRARY H1N1 flu virus particle. Computer artwork of an H1N1 influenza (flu) A virus particle (virion). At the virus' core is the RNA (ribonucleic acid) genetic material (yellowe). This is surrounded by a nucleocapsid (red) and a lipid envelope (green). In the envelope are two types of protein spike, haemagglutinin (H, green) and neuraminidase (N, yellow), which determine the strain of virus. These are used for recognising and binding to the host cell.
Wysoka rozdzielczosc dostepna na zamowienie
! EN_90261625_0013 SCI
PHOTO: EAST NEWS/SCIENCE PHOTO LIBRARY H1N1 flu virus particle. Computer artwork of an H1N1 influenza (flu) A virus particle (virion). At the virus' core is the RNA (ribonucleic acid) genetic material (red). This is surrounded by a nucleocapsid (orange) and a lipid envelope (purple). In the envelope are two types of protein spike, haemagglutinin (H, green) and neuraminidase (N, yellow), which determine the strain of virus. These are used for recognising and binding to the host cell.
Wysoka rozdzielczosc dostepna na zamowienie
! EN_90261627_0001 SCI
PHOTO: EAST NEWS/SCIENCE PHOTO LIBRARY H1N1 flu virus particles. Computer artwork of H1N1 influenza (flu) A virus particles (virions). In each particle's lipid envelope are two types of protein spike, haemagglutinin (H, tri-lobed spikes) and neuraminidase (N, squares), which determine the strain of virus. These are used for recognising and binding to the host cell.
Wysoka rozdzielczosc dostepna na zamowienie
! EN_90261627_0002 SCI
PHOTO: EAST NEWS/SCIENCE PHOTO LIBRARY H1N1 flu virus particles. Computer artwork of H1N1 influenza (flu) A virus particles (virions). In each particle's lipid envelope are two types of protein spike, haemagglutinin (H, tri-lobed spikes) and neuraminidase (N, squares), which determine the strain of virus. These are used for recognising and binding to the host cell.
Wysoka rozdzielczosc dostepna na zamowienie
! EN_90261627_0003 SCI
PHOTO: EAST NEWS/SCIENCE PHOTO LIBRARY H1N1 flu virus particles. Computer artwork of H1N1 influenza (flu) A virus particles (virions). In each particle's lipid envelope are two types of protein spike, haemagglutinin (H, tri-lobed spikes) and neuraminidase (N, squares), which determine the strain of virus. These are used for recognising and binding to the host cell.
Wysoka rozdzielczosc dostepna na zamowienie
! EN_90261627_0004 SCI
PHOTO: EAST NEWS/SCIENCE PHOTO LIBRARY H1N1 flu virus particles. Computer artwork of two H1N1 influenza (flu) A virus particles (virions). At the virus' core is the RNA (ribonucleic acid) genetic material (centre in cut-away virus at left). This is surrounded by a nucleocapsid (middle layer) and a lipid envelope (outer layer). In the envelope are two types of protein spike, haemagglutinin (H, tri-lobed spike) and neuraminidase (N, square), which determine the strain of virus. These are used for recognising and binding to the host cell.
Wysoka rozdzielczosc dostepna na zamowienie
! EN_90261627_0005 SCI
PHOTO: EAST NEWS/SCIENCE PHOTO LIBRARY H1N1 flu virus particles. Computer artwork of two H1N1 influenza (flu) A virus particles (virions). At the virus' core is the RNA (ribonucleic acid) genetic material (centre in cut-away virus at left). This is surrounded by a nucleocapsid (middle layer) and a lipid envelope (outer layer). In the envelope are two types of protein spike, haemagglutinin (H, tri-lobed spike) and neuraminidase (N, square), which determine the strain of virus. These are used for recognising and binding to the host cell.
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! EN_90276046_0006 SCI
PHOTO: EAST NEWS/SCIENCE PHOTO LIBRARY Rod-shaped bacteria, computer artwork. Typical rod-shaped bacteria (bacilli) are Escherichia coli and Salmonella bacteria, but there are many others. These bacteria have flagella (hair-like structures) at one end, that enable them to move.
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! EN_90247393_0001 SCI
PHOTO: EAST NEWS/SCIENCE PHOTO LIBRARY Bacteriophages destroying a bacterium, artwork. Image 3 of 3. Bacteriophages are viruses that infect bacteria. In previous stages, the bacteriophages injected their genetic material into the bacterium, and this genetic material was incorporated by the bacterium and used to build new bacteriophages. In the final stage (shown here), the new bacteriophages burst out of the bacterium, killing it. For a sequence showing this, see images C002/3774 to C002/3776.
Wysoka rozdzielczosc dostepna na zamowienie
! EN_90247394_0001 SCI
PHOTO: EAST NEWS/SCIENCE PHOTO LIBRARY Bacteriophages infecting a bacterium, cutaway artwork. Image 1 of 3. Bacteriophages (across top) are viruses that infect bacteria. Here, they are injecting their genetic material (red) into the bacterium. The bacterium's genetic material is a loop of DNA (deoxyribonucleic acid, blue). Subsequent stages see the bacteriophage genetic material being incorporated into the bacterial DNA, and the bacterium being used to produce more bacteriophages. In the final stage, the new bacteriophages burst out of the bacterium, killing it. For a sequence showing this, see images C002/3774 to C002/3776.
Wysoka rozdzielczosc dostepna na zamowienie
! EN_90247395_0001 SCI
PHOTO: EAST NEWS/SCIENCE PHOTO LIBRARY Bacteriophages replicating in a bacterium, cutaway artwork. Image 2 of 3. Bacteriophages are viruses that infect bacteria. In a previous stage, the bacteriophages injected their genetic material (red double helix) into the bacterium. This bacteriophage genetic material has been incorporated into the bacterium's loop of DNA (deoxyribonucleic acid, blue). Material (red) is being drawn into the bacterium, and the bacteriophage genetic instructions are being used by the bacterium to build new bacteriophages (upper right). In the final stage, the new bacteriophages burst out of the bacterium, killing it. For a sequence showing this, see images C002/3774 to C002/3776.
Wysoka rozdzielczosc dostepna na zamowienie
! EN_90261625_0005 SCI
PHOTO: EAST NEWS/SCIENCE PHOTO LIBRARY H1N1 flu virus particle. Computer artwork of an H1N1 influenza A (flu) virus particle (virion). In the particle's lipid envelope (red) are two types of protein spike, haemagglutinin (H) and neuraminidase (N), which determine the strain of virus. These are used for recognising and binding to the host cell.
Wysoka rozdzielczosc dostepna na zamowienie

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