poniedziałek, 11 grudnia 2017
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! EN_90262773_0002 SCI
PHOTO: EAST NEWS/SCIENCE PHOTO LIBRARY Homo antecessor. Artist's impression of an adult male Homo antecessor. The remains of this hominid were discovered in level TD6 of the Gran Dolina archaeological sites in Sierra de Atapuerca, Spain. Some of the remains contained cuts on the bones suggesting that this hominid may have practiced cannibalism. It lived between 600,000 and 250,000 years ago during the Pleistocene era, averaging about 5.5 feet in height and weighing up to 200 pounds.
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! EN_90262773_0003 SCI
PHOTO: EAST NEWS/SCIENCE PHOTO LIBRARY Homo antecessor. Artist's impression of an adult female Homo antecessor. The remains of this hominid were discovered in level TD6 of the Gran Dolina archaeological sites in Sierra de Atapuerca, Spain. Some of the remains contained cuts on the bones suggesting that this hominid may have practiced cannibalism. It lived between 600,000 and 250,000 years ago during the Pleistocene era, averaging about 5.5 feet in height and weighing up to 200 pounds.
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! EN_90262786_0001 SCI
PHOTO: EAST NEWS/SCIENCE PHOTO LIBRARY Homo floresiensis. Artist's impression of a group of Homo floresiensis with a freshly killed dwarf elephant (Stegodon sp.). The remains of H. floresiensis were discovered in 2003 at the Liang Bua Cave on the island of Flores, Indonesia. These hominids had an average height of 3 feet. They also had small brains but evidence suggests that they used fire and tools and hunted in groups. Flores was an isolated island that supported a unique range of fauna including dwarf elephants and large monitor lizards that H. floresiensis would have hunted. It is believed that H. floresiensis survived after the arrival of modern humans to the island but later became extinct.
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! EN_90262786_0002 SCI
PHOTO: EAST NEWS/SCIENCE PHOTO LIBRARY Homo floresiensis. Artist's impression of the skull, head and face of Homo floresiensis. The remains of this hominid were found in 2003 at the Liang Bua Cave on the island of Flores, Indonesia. These hominids had an average height of 3 feet and small brains but evidence suggests that they used fire and tools and hunted in groups. It is believed that H. floriensis survived after the arrival of modern humans to the island.
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! EN_90262794_0001 SCI
PHOTO: EAST NEWS/SCIENCE PHOTO LIBRARY Homo heidelbergensis. Artist's impression of two male H. heidelbergensis hominids which lived between 600,000 and 250,000 years ago in the Pleistocene era. The first remains were found in Heidelberg, Germany, in 1907 and further remains have been found in France and Greece. These remains indicate that H. heidelbergensis averaged around six foot in height and had a large brain. It used stone weapons and hunted in groups allowing it to kill large prey such as prehistoric species of rhino and elephant which lived throughout Eurasia.
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! EN_90262795_0001 SCI
PHOTO: EAST NEWS/SCIENCE PHOTO LIBRARY Homo heidelbergensis female, artist's impression. H. heidelbergensis lived between 600,000 and 250,000 years ago in the Pleistocene era. The first remains were found in Heidelberg, Germany, in 1907 and further remains have been found in France and Greece. These remains indicate that H. heidelbergensis averaged around six foot in height and had a large brain. It used stone weapons and hunted in groups allowing it to kill large prey such as prehistoric species of rhino and elephant which lived throughout Eurasia.
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! EN_90262796_0001 SCI
PHOTO: EAST NEWS/SCIENCE PHOTO LIBRARY Homo heidelbergensis male, artist's impression. H. heidelbergensis lived between 600,000 and 250,000 years ago in the Pleistocene era. The first remains were found in Heidelberg, Germany, in 1907 and further remains have been found in France and Greece. These remains indicate that H. heidelbergensis averaged around six foot in height and had a large brain. It used stone weapons and hunted in groups allowing it to kill large prey such as prehistoric species of rhino and elephant which lived throughout Eurasia.
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! EN_90262796_0002 SCI
PHOTO: EAST NEWS/SCIENCE PHOTO LIBRARY Homo heidelbergensis male, artist's impression. H. heidelbergensis lived between 600,000 and 250,000 years ago in the Pleistocene era. The first remains were found in Heidelberg, Germany, in 1907 and further remains have been found in France and Greece. These remains indicate that H. heidelbergensis averaged around six foot in height and had a large brain. It used stone weapons and hunted in groups allowing it to kill large prey such as prehistoric species of rhino and elephant which lived throughout Eurasia.
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! EN_90262797_0001 SCI
PHOTO: EAST NEWS/SCIENCE PHOTO LIBRARY Homo heidelbergensis skull and face of a male, artist's impression. H. heidelbergensis lived between 600,000 and 250,000 years ago in the Pleistocene era. The first remains were found in Heidelberg, Germany, in 1907 and further remains have been found in France and Greece. These remains indicate that H. heidelbergensis averaged around six foot in height and had a large brain. It used stone weapons and hunted in groups allowing it to kill large prey such as prehistoric species of rhino and elephant which lived throughout Eurasia.
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! EN_90264904_0001 SCI
PHOTO: EAST NEWS/SCIENCE PHOTO LIBRARY Kenyanthropus platyops. Artist's impression of the skull and face of of Kenyanthropus platyops. The remains of this hominid were found in 1999 at Lake Turkana. It lived between 3.5 and 3.2 million years ago in the Pilocene era. The remains suggest that it walked upright and had a flattened, broad face.
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! EN_90268823_0001 SCI
PHOTO: EAST NEWS/SCIENCE PHOTO LIBRARY Modern human and Homo floriensis. Illustration comparing a modern human female (Homo sapiens sapiens) with a female Homo floriensis. The remains of this hominid were found in 2003 at the Liang Bua Cave on the island of Flores, Indonesia. The remains included a skull of a 30-year-old female named Little Lady of Flo. Her height was around 3 feet. H. floriensis had a small brain but evidence suggests that it used fire and tools and hunted in groups.
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! EN_90247146_0001 SCI
PHOTO: EAST NEWS/SCIENCE PHOTO LIBRARY Australopithecus africanus. Artist's impression of the skull, facial muscle structure and face of an Australopithecus africanus hominid. A. Africanus was a bipedal hominid that lived between 3.5 and 2 million years ago. Study of the teeth of the hominid implies that it was omnivorous. It ranged throughout much of Africa.
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! EN_90247147_0001 SCI
PHOTO: EAST NEWS/SCIENCE PHOTO LIBRARY Australopithecus africanus skeleton, artist's impression. A. Africanus was a bipedal hominid that lived between 3.5 and 2 million years ago. Studies carried out on the teeth of this hominid implies that it was omnivorous. It ranged throughout much of Africa.
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! EN_90247152_0001 SCI
PHOTO: EAST NEWS/SCIENCE PHOTO LIBRARY Australopithecus boisei. Artist's impression of the skull and head of an Australopithecus boisei, a hominid that lived in Africa between about 2.3 to 1.3 million years ago. It had massive teeth, which are thought to have been an adaptation to a diet of tough plant foods. It is thought that its specialisation to such a diet led to its extinction after its environment changed. A. boisei was first discovered by Mary Leakey in the Olduvai Gorge, Tanzania, in 1959, and was named Zinjanthropus boisei. It is a robust australopithecine, and was heavier-built than the gracile australopithecines such as A. afarensis from which humans are thought to have evolved. This specimen is 1.8 million years old.
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! EN_90257838_0001 SCI
PHOTO: EAST NEWS/SCIENCE PHOTO LIBRARY Female Australopithecus africanus, artist's impression. A. Africanus was a bipedal hominid that lived between 3.5 and 2 million years ago. Studies undertaken on the teeth of the hominid suggest that it was omnivorous. It ranged throughout much of Africa.
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! EN_90257842_0001 SCI
PHOTO: EAST NEWS/SCIENCE PHOTO LIBRARY Female Homo habilis. Artist's impression of a female Homo habilis holding her young and plucking fruit from a tree. H. habilis was an ancestor of modern humans that lived between around 2.1 and 1.6 million years ago. 'Habilis' means 'handy', and refers to the supposed tool-making abilities of these hominids. Their brains were small though, with a cranium volume of around 700 cubic centimetres (compared to around 1350cc for modern humans).
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! EN_90262781_0002 SCI
PHOTO: EAST NEWS/SCIENCE PHOTO LIBRARY Homo ergaster. Artists impression of the skull, facial muscles and face of a Homo ergaster. H.ergaster is traditionally considered an early type of H. erectus by scientists. However, there are differences between the early populations of H. erectus in Africa and the later populations found in Europe, Africa and Asia. Many scientists now separate the two into distinct species; H. ergaster for early African 'Homo erectus' and H. erectus for later populations, mainly in Asia. Modern humans share the same differences as H. ergaster with the Asian H. erectus, so scientists consider H. ergaster to be the ancestor of later Homo populations.
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! EN_90262781_0003 SCI
PHOTO: EAST NEWS/SCIENCE PHOTO LIBRARY Homo ergaster hominids, artist's impression. H. ergaster is traditionally considered an early type of H. erectus by scientists. However, there are differences between the early populations of H. erectus in Africa and the later populations found in Europe, Africa and Asia. H. ergaster was a skillful hominid, capable of making and using advanced tools such as axes and cleavers, which have been found alongside remains. The evidence of such tools as well as the use of fire, suggests that H. ergaster had advanced skills and lived in close social groups.
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! EN_90262782_0001 SCI
PHOTO: EAST NEWS/SCIENCE PHOTO LIBRARY Homo ergaster behaviour, artist's impression. H. ergaster is traditionally considered an early type of H. erectus by scientists. However, there are differences between the early populations of H. erectus in Africa and the later populations found in Europe, Africa and Asia. H. ergaster was a skillful hominid, capable of making and using advanced tools such as axes and cleavers, which have been found alongside remains. The evidence of such tools as well as the use of fire, suggests that H. ergaster had advanced skills.
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! EN_90262783_0001 SCI
PHOTO: EAST NEWS/SCIENCE PHOTO LIBRARY Homo ergaster females and young, artist's impression. The hominid H. ergaster is traditionally considered an early type of H. erectus by scientists. However, there are differences between the early populations of H. erectus in Africa and the later populations found in Europe, Africa and Asia. H. ergaster was a skillful hominid, capable of making and using advanced tools such as axes and cleavers, which have been found alongside remains. The evidence of such tools as well as the use of fire, suggests that H. ergaster had advanced skills and lived in close social groups.
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