poniedziałek, 11 grudnia 2017
zamknij [x]
do:

Prehistoria (635)

293031
... z 32

Zdjęcia

! EN_90283790_0001 SCI
PHOTO: EAST NEWS/SCIENCE PHOTO LIBRARY Death of the dinosaurs. Computer illustration of Velociraptor sp. dinosaurs watching an asteroid or comet core as it rushes towards the Earth. This impact, which occurred about 65 million years ago at the end of the Cretaceous geological period, may have caused the extinction of the dinosaurs and 70% of all species on Earth. The object, thought to be 10-20 km across, struck the Earth at Chicxulub on the Yucatan Peninsula, Mexico. It threw huge amounts of debris into the upper atmosphere, blocking sunlight and causing global climate changes. The remains of this debris are found as a layer in rocks called the K/T boundary.
Wysoka rozdzielczosc dostepna na zamowienie
! EN_90246626_0001 SCI
PHOTO: EAST NEWS/SCIENCE PHOTO LIBRARY Evolution of life. Illustration of sea and land animals from various stages of the evolution of life on Earth. At lower left, jellyfish (mushroom shaped) can be seen. These were one of the first organisms to evolve. Other early marine life seen are cephalopods (cone shaped) and trilobites (brown, on sea bed). On land, dinosaurs such as Tyrannosaurus rex (centre right) and the flying pteranodon (upper right) can be seen. Dinosaurs gave way to mammals such as the mammoth (far right), and human predecessors such as Homo erectus (lower right). Archaeopteryx (blue, centre right) was the first feathered bird to evolve.
Wysoka rozdzielczosc dostepna na zamowienie
! EN_90246646_0001 SCI
PHOTO: EAST NEWS/SCIENCE PHOTO LIBRARY Carboniferous forest. Illustration of the sun setting over a Carboniferous forest. A flying insect similar to the modern day dragonfly is seen in the foreground at upper left. The Carboniferous period extended from 345 to 280 million years ago and was characterised by the abundance of primitive vascular plants such as club mosses, ferns and horsetails. These often reached a height of 15 to 20 metres and contributed largely to the formation of coal seams. The fauna consisted mainly of insects, freshwater molluscs, fishes and some amphibians.
Wysoka rozdzielczosc dostepna na zamowienie
! EN_90246646_0002 SCI
PHOTO: EAST NEWS/SCIENCE PHOTO LIBRARY Carboniferous forest. Illustration of the Sun's rays shining through a Carboniferous forest. The Carboniferous period extended from 345 to 280 million years ago and is characterised by the abundance of primitive vascular plants such as club mosses, ferns and horsetails. These often reached a height of 15 to 20 metres and contributed largely to the formation of coal seams. The fauna consisted mainly of insects, freshwater molluscs, fishes and some amphibians.
Wysoka rozdzielczosc dostepna na zamowienie
! EN_90282750_0001 SCI
PHOTO: EAST NEWS/SCIENCE PHOTO LIBRARY Early use of fire. Illustration of Homo erectus using fire to cook meat. At upper right, a Homo erectus man is igniting a stick from a tree that has been struck by lightning. This could be the way that man learnt to harness fire. The name Homo erectus translates to 'erect man'. The erect standing H. erectus stood 1.68 metres tall, perhaps more. Living 1.8 million years to 200,000 years ago, it was the first human type to spread from Africa to Asia. They had a mixed diet and were nomadic hunter-gatherers.
Wysoka rozdzielczosc dostepna na zamowienie
! EN_90282751_0001 SCI
PHOTO: EAST NEWS/SCIENCE PHOTO LIBRARY Early use of fire. Illustration of a tribe of Homo erectus using fire to make spears. Also seen in the image, at centre left, are a male and female Homo erectus skinning a deer-like creature. At far left are two hunters returning with another kill. The name Homo erectus translates to 'erect man'. The erect standing Homo erectus stood 1.68 metres tall, perhaps more. Living 1.8 million years to 200,000 years ago, it was the first human type to spread from Africa to Asia. They had a mixed diet and were nomadic hunter-gatherers.
Wysoka rozdzielczosc dostepna na zamowienie
! EN_90246702_0001 SCI
PHOTO: EAST NEWS/SCIENCE PHOTO LIBRARY Primeval Earth. Artwork of the surface of the Earth early in its history. The hot pool in the foreground is similar to those believed to have been necessary for the origin of life. Two meteors are seen streaking through the sky at upper right. Meteors and meteorite impacts were far more common in the early years of Earth's life. The Solar System was still young, and countless millions of dust and rock particles remained from the formation of the planets. The crust of the Earth was forming, and active volcanoes were far more common. These added valuable chemicals to the environment. The moon is large in the sky at upper right. At this time, it was closer than it is now.
Wysoka rozdzielczosc dostepna na zamowienie
! EN_90282224_0001 SCI
PHOTO: EAST NEWS/SCIENCE PHOTO LIBRARY Death of the dinosaurs. Artwork of the dinosaur Titanosaurus watching an approaching giant sea wave (tsunami) caused by the impact of an asteroid or comet core. This impact may have caused the ex- tinction of the dinosaurs & 70% of all species on Earth about 65 million years ago at the end of the Cretaceous geological period. The object, which was 10-20 kilometres (km) across, struck the Earth at Chicxulub on the Yucatan peninsula, Mexico. It created a tsunami which was up to 3 km high which rapidly travelled vast distances - here it is approaching the Central American coast at 800 km per hour. Dust thrown into the atmosphere by the impact caused darkness and global climate changes.
Wysoka rozdzielczosc dostepna na zamowienie
! EN_90252968_0001 SCI
PHOTO: EAST NEWS/SCIENCE PHOTO LIBRARY Dinosaur extinction. Computer enhanced image depicting the extinction of the dinosaurs. A Gasosaurus constructus dinosaur skeleton is seen with a falling comet or meteorite. Dinosaurs became extinct about 65 million years ago at the end of the Cretaceous period. Their disappearance has been partly blamed on a comet or meteorite striking Earth. This event is known as the 'K/T impact' because debris from it forms a boundary in sediments between the Cretaceous (K) and Tertiary (T) geological periods. The K/T impact would have thrown large amounts of debris into the atmosphere, blocking the warmth of the Sun and altering the global climate.
Wysoka rozdzielczosc dostepna na zamowienie
! EN_90256784_0001 SCI
PHOTO: EAST NEWS/SCIENCE PHOTO LIBRARY Triceratops. Computer enhanced image of fossilised skulls of a Triceratops dinosaur. Triceratops ('three-horned face') was a herbivore that had skulls which were up to 2 metres long. The skull was this dinosaur's main defence against predators due to the three horns (2 over the eye sockets and one on the nose), and a bony frill that protected the neck. This powerful and heavily-built dinosaur was a formidable opponent for any predator. The frill had slots where large muscles for powering the creature's beak-like jaw were attached. Triceratops evolved only a few million years before dinosaurs became extinct at the end of the Cretaceous period (about 65 million years ago).
Wysoka rozdzielczosc dostepna na zamowienie
! EN_90256787_0001 SCI
PHOTO: EAST NEWS/SCIENCE PHOTO LIBRARY Triceratops. Computer enhanced image of the fossilised skeleton of a Triceratops dinosaur. Triceratops ('three-horned face') was a herbivore that grew up to 9 metres (m) long and weighed up to 6 tonnes; their skulls were up to 2m long. This powerful and heavily-built dinosaur was a formidable opponent for any predator. They defended themselves with horns, whilst a bony frill protected their neck. The frill had slots where large muscles for powering the creature's beak-like jaw were attached. Triceratops evolved only a few million years before dinosaurs became extinct at the end of the Cretaceous period (about 65 million years ago).
Wysoka rozdzielczosc dostepna na zamowienie
! EN_90282393_0001 SCI
PHOTO: EAST NEWS/SCIENCE PHOTO LIBRARY Dinosaur extinction. Computer illustration of a Torosaurus dinosaur standing in an icy landscape. Some scientists believe that dinosaurs and many other creatures were made extinct by an increasingly cold and unstable climate at the end of the Cretaceous period (65 million years ago). This climatic change is thought to be partly due to volcanic eruptions and a large meteorite which struck the Earth. These threw large amounts of dust into the upper atmosphere and blocked out the warmth of the Sun.
Wysoka rozdzielczosc dostepna na zamowienie
! EN_90246614_0001 SCI
PHOTO: EAST NEWS/SCIENCE PHOTO LIBRARY Artist's impression of a Tertiary period landscape. This period extended from 65 to about 2 million years ago and is divided into five epochs: the Paleocene, Eocene, Oligocene, Miocene and Pliocene. Dinosaurs died out early on in the Tertiary, and mammals progressed rapidly. This illustration shows some of the reptiles and mammals of the epoch, which included the elephant- like dinotherium and mastodon, also the sabre- toothed tiger. Anthropoid apes appeared, and towards the end the present forms of continents developed. Temperatures dropped signalling the beginning of the ice-ages at the end of the Pliocene.
Wysoka rozdzielczosc dostepna na zamowienie
! EN_90274045_0001 SCI
PHOTO: EAST NEWS/SCIENCE PHOTO LIBRARY Prehistoric sea level map. Published in 1913, this map shows changes in rivers and drainage patterns with sea level changes in Western Europe in prehistoric times (40,000 to 100,000 years ago). The map shows existing land masses (green) together with land masses which existed when sea levels were much lower than now (light green). At such times the rivers (blue) flowed across grassy plains now covered by sea. Sea levels are linked to periods of glaciation when much of the Earth's water is frozen to make glaciers, resulting in a drop in sea levels. Map from the 1913 edition of Prehistoric Times (Sir John Lubbock).
Wysoka rozdzielczosc dostepna na zamowienie
! EN_90274045_0002 SCI
PHOTO: EAST NEWS/SCIENCE PHOTO LIBRARY Prehistoric sea level map. Published in 1913, this map shows changes in rivers and drainage patterns with sea level changes in Western Europe in prehistoric times (40,000 to 100,000 years ago). The map shows existing land masses (black) together with land masses which existed when sea levels were much lower than now (grey). At such times the rivers (white lines) flowed across grassy plains now covered by sea. Sea levels are linked to periods of glaciation when much of the Earth's water is frozen to make glaciers, resulting in a drop in sea levels. Map from the 1913 edition of Prehistoric Times (Sir John Lubbock).
Wysoka rozdzielczosc dostepna na zamowienie
Chcesz więcej zdjęć?
Użyj wyszukiwarki.

góra

293031
... z 32