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Założyciel Huawei broni firmę przed oskarżeniami o szpiegostwo (28)

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EN_01357423_1979 AP
Ren Zhengfei, founder and CEO of Huawei, gestures during a round table meeting with the media in Shenzhen city, south China's Guangdong province, Tuesday, Jan. 15, 2019. The founder of network gear and smart phone supplier Huawei Technologies said the tech giant would reject requests from the Chinese government to disclose confidential information about its customers. (AP Photo/Vincent Yu)
EN_01357423_2007 AP
Ren Zhengfei, founder and CEO of Huawei, wipes his fingers with a towel during a round table meeting with the media in Shenzhen city, south China's Guangdong province, Tuesday, Jan. 15, 2019. The founder of network gear and smart phone supplier Huawei Technologies said the tech giant would reject requests from the Chinese government to disclose confidential information about its customers. (AP Photo/Vincent Yu)
EN_01355728_0099 WL
Fot. Wojtek Laski / East News Reklama chinskiej firmy, Huawei, producenta urzadzen telekomunikacyjnych (smartfonow). Warszawa, 15.01.2019
EN_01355728_0100 WL
Fot. Wojtek Laski / East News Reklama chinskiej firmy, Huawei, producenta urzadzen telekomunikacyjnych (smartfonow). Warszawa, 15.01.2019
EN_01351880_3879 AP
Ren Zhengfei, founder and CEO of Huawei, gestures during a round table meeting with the media in Shenzhen city, south China's Guangdong province, Tuesday, Jan. 15, 2019. The founder of network gear and smart phone supplier Huawei Technologies said the tech giant would reject requests from the Chinese government to disclose confidential information about its customers. (AP Photo/Vincent Yu), APTOPIX
EN_01357147_0007 SIP
Horizon Plaza, the office building where the headquarters of the Polish branch of Huawei is located is seen in Warsaw, Poland on January 12, 2018. On Friday a Chinese national, an employee of Huawei has been arrested by the Polish Internal Security Agency (ABW) on suspicion of spying for the Chinese government. (Photo by Jaap Arriens / Sipa USA)
*** World Rights ***
EN_01356942_1960 AP
The Huawei logo displayed at the main office of Chinese tech giant Huawei in Warsaw, Poland, on Friday, Jan. 11, 2019. Poland's Internal Security Agency has charged a Chinese manager at Huawei in Poland and one of its own former officers with espionage against Poland on behalf of China. (AP Photo/Czarek Sokolowski)
EN_01356186_0952 RP
11.01.2019 Krakow N/z logo firmy Huawei wyswietlonie na ekranie smartphona fot. Beata Zawrzel/REPORTER
INTERNET + 100 %
EN_01356749_1960 AFP
The Huawei booth is seen during CES 2019 consumer electronics show, January 10, 2019 at the Las Vegas Convention Center in Las Vegas, Nevada. (Photo by Robert LEVER / AFP)
EN_01351880_3991 AFP
--FILE--Ren Zhengfei, President and CEO of Huawei Technologies, attends an interview in China. In his first letter to employees in 2019, Huawei CEO Ren Zhengfei said the company will strengthen the credibility of its products largely by advancing Huawei's software engineering. Not the most moving of holiday letters, admittedly. But Ren is not prone to flowery language. Ren said an initial $2 billion will be allocated toward engineering high-quality and "credible" telecom infrastructure products — saying the enhancement of its offerings would be "revolutionary." Huawei may count 2018 as the year it wished it could forget. Several countries banned Huawei's involvement on telecom projects over national security and privacy concerns. And last month Canada arrested Huawei CEO Meng Wanzhou at the request of the U.S., who says she committed fraud in breach of U.S. sanctions against Iran. Ren didn't directly address these developments in letter, but he promised a focus on privacy.
EN_01351880_3992 AFP
--FILE--Ren Zhengfei, President and CEO of Huawei Technologies, speaks at a public event in Shenzhen city, south China's Guangdong province, April 2018. In his first letter to employees in 2019, Huawei CEO Ren Zhengfei said the company will strengthen the credibility of its products largely by advancing Huawei's software engineering. Not the most moving of holiday letters, admittedly. But Ren is not prone to flowery language. Ren said an initial $2 billion will be allocated toward engineering high-quality and "credible" telecom infrastructure products — saying the enhancement of its offerings would be "revolutionary." Huawei may count 2018 as the year it wished it could forget. Several countries banned Huawei's involvement on telecom projects over national security and privacy concerns. And last month Canada arrested Huawei CEO Meng Wanzhou at the request of the U.S., who says she committed fraud in breach of U.S. sanctions against Iran. Ren didn't directly address these developments in letter, but he promised a focus on privacy.
EN_01357243_2637 AP
--FILE--Customers shop at a store of Huawei at a shopping mall in Kunming city, southwest China's Yunnan province, 16 December 2018. Huawei has terminated a company executive in Poland after his arrest over suspected espionage as the world's largest telecommunications equipment maker moved to distance itself from the incident. "Huawei has terminated the employment of Mr. Wang Weijing, who was arrested on suspicion of breaking Polish law," the Shenzhen-based firm said in a statement, adding that his alleged actions have no relation to the company and that the incident has brought Huawei into disrepute. Polish counter-intelligence services arrested Wang, the company's sales director for government contracts in the country, on Jan. 11. His arrest marks the second Huawei executive to be taken into custody in as many months after Chief Financial Officer Sabrina Meng was detained in Canada in December at the request of a US prosecutor. Meng has since been released on bail. (Imaginechina via AP Images)
For editorial use only. Please contact your AP representative for commercial use. China OUT; France OUT ; IC-URN:20181217_06644
EN_01353479_2255 AP
Huawei chief financial officer Meng Wanzhou, right, arrives at a parole office with a member of her private security detail in Vancouver, on Wednesday December 12, 2018. (Darryl Dyck/The Canadian Press via AP)
MANDATORY CREDIT
EN_01353479_2257 AP
Huawei chief financial officer Meng Wanzhou, right, is escorted by a member of her private security detail while arriving at a parole office, in Vancouver, on Wednesday December 12, 2018. (Darryl Dyck/The Canadian Press via AP)
MANDATORY CREDIT
EN_01353479_2266 AP
Huawei chief financial officer Meng Wanzhou, talks with a member of her private security detail after they went into the wrong building while arriving at a parole office, in Vancouver, on Wednesday December 12, 2018. (Darryl Dyck/The Canadian Press via AP)
MANDATORY CREDITALTERNATE CROP OF VCRD115
EN_01353479_2293 AP
Huawei chief financial officer Meng Wanzhou, leaves her home in Vancouver on Wednesday, December 12, 2018. (Jonathan Hayward/The Canadian Press via AP)
MANDATORY CREDIT
EN_01357243_3198 AP
FILE - In this Wednesday, Dec. 12, 2018 file photo, Huawei chief financial officer Meng Wanzhou leaves her home in Vancouver, British Columbia. A Chinese court has sentenced a Canadian man to death in a sudden retrial in a drug smuggling case that is likely to escalate tensions between the countries over the arrest of a top Chinese technology executive. The Chinese press began publicizing Robert Lloyd Schellenberg's case in December after Canada detained Meng Wanzhou, chief financial officer of the Chinese telecommunications giant Huawei, on Dec. 1 at the request of the United States. (Jonathan Hayward/The Canadian Press via AP, File)
WEDNESDAY, DEC. 12, 2018 FILE PHOTO MANDATORY CREDIT
EN_01352950_0454 AFP
People walk past a Huawei store in Beijing on December 10, 2018. - China on December 10 protested Canada's "inhumane" treatment of an executive of telecom giant Huawei who is being held on a US extradition bid, following reports she was not getting sufficient medical care. (Photo by GREG BAKER / AFP)
EN_01353479_1536 AP
People hold a sign in favor of the release of Huawei Technologies CFO Meng Wanzhou outside the Supreme Court of B.C. during the second day of Meng's bail hearing in Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada, 10 December 2018. A Canadian court is considering whether to grant bail to the chief financial officer for Chinese telecom giant Huawei Technologies while she awaits possible extradition to the United States to face fraud charges. The court in Vancouver heard a second day of testimony Monday in the bail hearing for Meng Wanzhou. Lawyers for Meng argued that she should be granted bail, saying that a combination of high-tech devices and a multi-million dollar bond could ensure she does not flee. They also said that if Meng fled the country she would embarrass China, calling that option "inconceivable." The lawyers said Meng would be willing to hire a surveillance company that would arrest her if she breaches her bail conditions and would wear a GPS bracelet at all times. They said Meng's husband would put up both of their Vancouver homes plus $750,000 for a total value of over $11 million as collateral. Prosecutors have argued that Meng should be denied bail, saying she has vast resources and a strong incentive to flee. The judge overseeing the case said the hearing would resume Tuesday morning. (Imaginechina via AP Images)
For editorial use only. Please contact your AP representative for commercial use. China OUT; France OUT ; IC-URN:pbu904974_01
EN_01351880_0429 REX
Mandatory Credit: Photo by Canadian Press/REX/Shutterstock (10018784s) In this courtroom sketch, Meng Wanzhou, back right, the chief financial officer of Huawei Technologies, sits beside a translator during a bail hearing at B.C. Supreme Court in Vancouver, on Friday December 7, 2018. She was arrested Saturday after an extradition request from the United States while in transit at the city's airport. Huawei Technologies CFO Meng Wanzhou Supreme Court hearing, Vancouver, Canada - 07 Dec 2018

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