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USA - pszczelarz w Waszyngtonie - AFP (18)

EN_01390049_0932 AFP
Urban beekeeper Del Voss climbs to his apiary above his garage on August 7, 2019, in Washington, DC. - The whine of a bee close by is enough to bring some of us out in hives. But in the US capital, a booming trend of urban beekeeping is creating quite a buzz. With populations in decline across the planet, the plight of a creature that pollinates about 90 percent of our food supply has prompted residents to keep bees in their gardens and on their roofs. Voss, a beekeeper for the last eight years, says that ensuring the hobby remains popular is critical to their survival. "Bees in DC are so close to humans," said Voss, 53, who keeps the honeymaking variety of the much-misunderstood insect on top of his garage in Capitol Hill. (Photo by Brendan Smialowski / AFP)
TO GO WITH AFP STORY by Tori Otten, "In the eye of the swarm: apiary all the buzz in US capital"
EN_01390049_0933 AFP
Urban beekeeper Del Voss walks to his apiary above his garage on August 7, 2019, in Washington, DC. - The whine of a bee close by is enough to bring some of us out in hives. But in the US capital, a booming trend of urban beekeeping is creating quite a buzz. With populations in decline across the planet, the plight of a creature that pollinates about 90 percent of our food supply has prompted residents to keep bees in their gardens and on their roofs. Voss, a beekeeper for the last eight years, says that ensuring the hobby remains popular is critical to their survival. "Bees in DC are so close to humans," said Voss, 53, who keeps the honeymaking variety of the much-misunderstood insect on top of his garage in Capitol Hill. (Photo by Brendan Smialowski / AFP)
TO GO WITH AFP STORY by Tori Otten, "In the eye of the swarm: apiary all the buzz in US capital"
EN_01390049_0934 AFP
A view of Urban beekeeper Del Voss's apiary above his garage on August 7, 2019, in Washington, DC. - The whine of a bee close by is enough to bring some of us out in hives. But in the US capital, a booming trend of urban beekeeping is creating quite a buzz. With populations in decline across the planet, the plight of a creature that pollinates about 90 percent of our food supply has prompted residents to keep bees in their gardens and on their roofs. Voss, a beekeeper for the last eight years, says that ensuring the hobby remains popular is critical to their survival. "Bees in DC are so close to humans," said Voss, 53, who keeps the honeymaking variety of the much-misunderstood insect on top of his garage in Capitol Hill. (Photo by Brendan Smialowski / AFP)
TO GO WITH AFP STORY by Tori Otten, "In the eye of the swarm: apiary all the buzz in US capital"
EN_01390049_0935 AFP
Urban beekeeper Del Voss waits to open his apiary above his garage on August 7, 2019, in Washington, DC. - The whine of a bee close by is enough to bring some of us out in hives. But in the US capital, a booming trend of urban beekeeping is creating quite a buzz. With populations in decline across the planet, the plight of a creature that pollinates about 90 percent of our food supply has prompted residents to keep bees in their gardens and on their roofs. Voss, a beekeeper for the last eight years, says that ensuring the hobby remains popular is critical to their survival. "Bees in DC are so close to humans," said Voss, 53, who keeps the honeymaking variety of the much-misunderstood insect on top of his garage in Capitol Hill. (Photo by Brendan Smialowski / AFP)
TO GO WITH AFP STORY by Tori Otten, "In the eye of the swarm: apiary all the buzz in US capital"
EN_01390049_0936 AFP
Urban beekeeper Del Voss looks at beehives in his apiary above his garage on August 7, 2019, in Washington, DC. - The whine of a bee close by is enough to bring some of us out in hives. But in the US capital, a booming trend of urban beekeeping is creating quite a buzz. With populations in decline across the planet, the plight of a creature that pollinates about 90 percent of our food supply has prompted residents to keep bees in their gardens and on their roofs. Voss, a beekeeper for the last eight years, says that ensuring the hobby remains popular is critical to their survival. "Bees in DC are so close to humans," said Voss, 53, who keeps the honeymaking variety of the much-misunderstood insect on top of his garage in Capitol Hill. (Photo by Brendan Smialowski / AFP)
TO GO WITH AFP STORY by Tori Otten, "In the eye of the swarm: apiary all the buzz in US capital"
EN_01390049_0937 AFP
Piles of bees are seen near urban beekeeper Del Voss's apiary after testing for Varroa Mites above his garage on August 7, 2019, in Washington, DC. - The whine of a bee close by is enough to bring some of us out in hives. But in the US capital, a booming trend of urban beekeeping is creating quite a buzz. With populations in decline across the planet, the plight of a creature that pollinates about 90 percent of our food supply has prompted residents to keep bees in their gardens and on their roofs. Voss, a beekeeper for the last eight years, says that ensuring the hobby remains popular is critical to their survival. "Bees in DC are so close to humans," said Voss, 53, who keeps the honeymaking variety of the much-misunderstood insect on top of his garage in Capitol Hill. (Photo by Brendan Smialowski / AFP)
TO GO WITH AFP STORY by Tori Otten, "In the eye of the swarm: apiary all the buzz in US capital"
EN_01390049_0938 AFP
Urban beekeeper Del Voss opens his apiary while looking at beehives above his garage on August 7, 2019, in Washington, DC. - The whine of a bee close by is enough to bring some of us out in hives. But in the US capital, a booming trend of urban beekeeping is creating quite a buzz. With populations in decline across the planet, the plight of a creature that pollinates about 90 percent of our food supply has prompted residents to keep bees in their gardens and on their roofs. Voss, a beekeeper for the last eight years, says that ensuring the hobby remains popular is critical to their survival. "Bees in DC are so close to humans," said Voss, 53, who keeps the honeymaking variety of the much-misunderstood insect on top of his garage in Capitol Hill. (Photo by Brendan Smialowski / AFP)
TO GO WITH AFP STORY by Tori Otten, "In the eye of the swarm: apiary all the buzz in US capital"
EN_01390049_0939 AFP
Urban beekeeper Del Voss opens his apiary while looking at beehives above his garage on August 7, 2019, in Washington, DC. - The whine of a bee close by is enough to bring some of us out in hives. But in the US capital, a booming trend of urban beekeeping is creating quite a buzz. With populations in decline across the planet, the plight of a creature that pollinates about 90 percent of our food supply has prompted residents to keep bees in their gardens and on their roofs. Voss, a beekeeper for the last eight years, says that ensuring the hobby remains popular is critical to their survival. "Bees in DC are so close to humans," said Voss, 53, who keeps the honeymaking variety of the much-misunderstood insect on top of his garage in Capitol Hill. (Photo by Brendan Smialowski / AFP)
TO GO WITH AFP STORY by Tori Otten, "In the eye of the swarm: apiary all the buzz in US capital"
EN_01390049_0940 AFP
Bees are seen in urban beekeeper Del Voss's apiary above his garage on August 7, 2019, in Washington, DC. - The whine of a bee close by is enough to bring some of us out in hives. But in the US capital, a booming trend of urban beekeeping is creating quite a buzz. With populations in decline across the planet, the plight of a creature that pollinates about 90 percent of our food supply has prompted residents to keep bees in their gardens and on their roofs. Voss, a beekeeper for the last eight years, says that ensuring the hobby remains popular is critical to their survival. "Bees in DC are so close to humans," said Voss, 53, who keeps the honeymaking variety of the much-misunderstood insect on top of his garage in Capitol Hill. (Photo by Brendan Smialowski / AFP)
TO GO WITH AFP STORY by Tori Otten, "In the eye of the swarm: apiary all the buzz in US capital"
EN_01390049_0941 AFP
Urban beekeeper Del Voss looks at beehives from his apiary above his garage on August 7, 2019, in Washington, DC. - The whine of a bee close by is enough to bring some of us out in hives. But in the US capital, a booming trend of urban beekeeping is creating quite a buzz. With populations in decline across the planet, the plight of a creature that pollinates about 90 percent of our food supply has prompted residents to keep bees in their gardens and on their roofs. Voss, a beekeeper for the last eight years, says that ensuring the hobby remains popular is critical to their survival. "Bees in DC are so close to humans," said Voss, 53, who keeps the honeymaking variety of the much-misunderstood insect on top of his garage in Capitol Hill. (Photo by Brendan Smialowski / AFP)
TO GO WITH AFP STORY by Tori Otten, "In the eye of the swarm: apiary all the buzz in US capital"
EN_01390049_0942 AFP
Beekeeping paraphernalia is seen in urban beekeeper Del Voss home on August 7, 2019, in Washington, DC. - The whine of a bee close by is enough to bring some of us out in hives. But in the US capital, a booming trend of urban beekeeping is creating quite a buzz. With populations in decline across the planet, the plight of a creature that pollinates about 90 percent of our food supply has prompted residents to keep bees in their gardens and on their roofs. Voss, a beekeeper for the last eight years, says that ensuring the hobby remains popular is critical to their survival. "Bees in DC are so close to humans," said Voss, 53, who keeps the honeymaking variety of the much-misunderstood insect on top of his garage in Capitol Hill. (Photo by Brendan Smialowski / AFP)
TO GO WITH AFP STORY by Tori Otten, "In the eye of the swarm: apiary all the buzz in US capital"
EN_01390049_0943 AFP
Urban beekeeper Del Voss lights a smoker before opening his apiary above his garage on August 7, 2019, in Washington, DC. - The whine of a bee close by is enough to bring some of us out in hives. But in the US capital, a booming trend of urban beekeeping is creating quite a buzz. With populations in decline across the planet, the plight of a creature that pollinates about 90 percent of our food supply has prompted residents to keep bees in their gardens and on their roofs. Voss, a beekeeper for the last eight years, says that ensuring the hobby remains popular is critical to their survival. "Bees in DC are so close to humans," said Voss, 53, who keeps the honeymaking variety of the much-misunderstood insect on top of his garage in Capitol Hill. (Photo by Brendan Smialowski / AFP)
TO GO WITH AFP STORY by Tori Otten, "In the eye of the swarm: apiary all the buzz in US capital"
EN_01390049_0944 AFP
Urban beekeeper Del Voss opens his apiary above his garage on August 7, 2019, in Washington, DC. - The whine of a bee close by is enough to bring some of us out in hives. But in the US capital, a booming trend of urban beekeeping is creating quite a buzz. With populations in decline across the planet, the plight of a creature that pollinates about 90 percent of our food supply has prompted residents to keep bees in their gardens and on their roofs. Voss, a beekeeper for the last eight years, says that ensuring the hobby remains popular is critical to their survival. "Bees in DC are so close to humans," said Voss, 53, who keeps the honeymaking variety of the much-misunderstood insect on top of his garage in Capitol Hill. (Photo by Brendan Smialowski / AFP)
TO GO WITH AFP STORY by Tori Otten, "In the eye of the swarm: apiary all the buzz in US capital"
EN_01390049_0945 AFP
Urban beekeeper Del Voss looks at beehives from his apiary above his garage on August 7, 2019, in Washington, DC. - The whine of a bee close by is enough to bring some of us out in hives. But in the US capital, a booming trend of urban beekeeping is creating quite a buzz. With populations in decline across the planet, the plight of a creature that pollinates about 90 percent of our food supply has prompted residents to keep bees in their gardens and on their roofs. Voss, a beekeeper for the last eight years, says that ensuring the hobby remains popular is critical to their survival. "Bees in DC are so close to humans," said Voss, 53, who keeps the honeymaking variety of the much-misunderstood insect on top of his garage in Capitol Hill. (Photo by Brendan Smialowski / AFP)
TO GO WITH AFP STORY by Tori Otten, "In the eye of the swarm: apiary all the buzz in US capital"
EN_01390049_0946 AFP
Urban beekeeper Del Voss opens his apiary while looking at beehives above his garage on August 7, 2019, in Washington, DC. - The whine of a bee close by is enough to bring some of us out in hives. But in the US capital, a booming trend of urban beekeeping is creating quite a buzz. With populations in decline across the planet, the plight of a creature that pollinates about 90 percent of our food supply has prompted residents to keep bees in their gardens and on their roofs. Voss, a beekeeper for the last eight years, says that ensuring the hobby remains popular is critical to their survival. "Bees in DC are so close to humans," said Voss, 53, who keeps the honeymaking variety of the much-misunderstood insect on top of his garage in Capitol Hill. (Photo by Brendan Smialowski / AFP)
TO GO WITH AFP STORY by Tori Otten, "In the eye of the swarm: apiary all the buzz in US capital"
EN_01390049_0947 AFP
Urban beekeeper Del Voss looks at his apiary above his garage on August 7, 2019, in Washington, DC. - The whine of a bee close by is enough to bring some of us out in hives. But in the US capital, a booming trend of urban beekeeping is creating quite a buzz. With populations in decline across the planet, the plight of a creature that pollinates about 90 percent of our food supply has prompted residents to keep bees in their gardens and on their roofs. Voss, a beekeeper for the last eight years, says that ensuring the hobby remains popular is critical to their survival. "Bees in DC are so close to humans," said Voss, 53, who keeps the honeymaking variety of the much-misunderstood insect on top of his garage in Capitol Hill. (Photo by Brendan Smialowski / AFP)
TO GO WITH AFP STORY by Tori Otten, "In the eye of the swarm: apiary all the buzz in US capital"
EN_01390049_0948 AFP
Bees are seen in urban beekeeper Del Voss's apiary above his garage on August 7, 2019, in Washington, DC. - The whine of a bee close by is enough to bring some of us out in hives. But in the US capital, a booming trend of urban beekeeping is creating quite a buzz. With populations in decline across the planet, the plight of a creature that pollinates about 90 percent of our food supply has prompted residents to keep bees in their gardens and on their roofs. Voss, a beekeeper for the last eight years, says that ensuring the hobby remains popular is critical to their survival. "Bees in DC are so close to humans," said Voss, 53, who keeps the honeymaking variety of the much-misunderstood insect on top of his garage in Capitol Hill. (Photo by Brendan Smialowski / AFP)
TO GO WITH AFP STORY by Tori Otten, "In the eye of the swarm: apiary all the buzz in US capital"
EN_01390049_0949 AFP
Urban beekeeper Del Voss walks from his apiary above his garage on August 7, 2019, in Washington, DC. - The whine of a bee close by is enough to bring some of us out in hives. But in the US capital, a booming trend of urban beekeeping is creating quite a buzz. With populations in decline across the planet, the plight of a creature that pollinates about 90 percent of our food supply has prompted residents to keep bees in their gardens and on their roofs. Voss, a beekeeper for the last eight years, says that ensuring the hobby remains popular is critical to their survival. "Bees in DC are so close to humans," said Voss, 53, who keeps the honeymaking variety of the much-misunderstood insect on top of his garage in Capitol Hill. (Photo by Brendan Smialowski / AFP)
TO GO WITH AFP STORY by Tori Otten, "In the eye of the swarm: apiary all the buzz in US capital"

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