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Schronisko dla ofiar gwałtu w Nigerii - AFP (11)

EN_01387015_0194 AFP
A Nigerian man, who returned from Libya after being stranded for several months on his way to Europe, is portrayed at home in Benin City on June 27, 2019. - More than 14,000 young Nigerians, most of them between the ages of 17 and 35, have returned to their home country through the United Nations Voluntary Return programme, after living in hell in Libya, stranded during months, sometimes years, unable to turn around or cross the Mediterranean. Back in their country, they find themselves faced with a life even more difficult than when they left: riddled with debt, unemployed, broken by the tortures of their traffickers and by their stranded dreams, and victims of the glance of a society that nicknamed them "the returned ones" or the "deportees". (Photo by FATI ABUBAKAR / AFP)
TO GO WITH AN AFP STORY BY SOPHIE BOUILLON
EN_01387015_0195 AFP
A Nigerian couple, who returned from Libya after being stranded for several months on their way to Europe, is portrayed at home in Benin City on June 27, 2019. - More than 14,000 young Nigerians, most of them between the ages of 17 and 35, have returned to their home country through the United Nations Voluntary Return programme, after living in hell in Libya, stranded during months, sometimes years, unable to turn around or cross the Mediterranean. Back in their country, they find themselves faced with a life even more difficult than when they left: riddled with debt, unemployed, broken by the tortures of their traffickers and by their stranded dreams, and victims of the glance of a society that nicknamed them "the returned ones" or the "deportees". (Photo by FATI ABUBAKAR / AFP)
TO GO WITH AN AFP STORY BY SOPHIE BOUILLON
EN_01387015_0196 AFP
A Nigerian man, who returned from Libya after being stranded for several months on his way to Europe, is portrayed at home in Benin City on June 27, 2019. - More than 14,000 young Nigerians, most of them between the ages of 17 and 35, have returned to their home country through the United Nations Voluntary Return programme, after living in hell in Libya, stranded during months, sometimes years, unable to turn around or cross the Mediterranean. Back in their country, they find themselves faced with a life even more difficult than when they left: riddled with debt, unemployed, broken by the tortures of their traffickers and by their stranded dreams, and victims of the glance of a society that nicknamed them "the returned ones" or the "deportees". (Photo by Fati ABUBAKAR / AFP)
TO GO WITH AN AFP STORY BY SOPHIE BOUILLON
EN_01387015_0186 AFP
A woman and her child rest on June 26, 2019 in Benin City, at one of the shelters of the Society For the Empowerment Of Young Persons (SEYP), an organisation that rehabilitates and reintegrates women returning from Libya carrying young children often born as the result of rape. - More than 14,000 young Nigerians, most of them between the ages of 17 and 35, have returned to their home country through the United Nations Voluntary Return programme, after living in hell in Libya, stranded during months, sometimes years, unable to turn around or cross the Mediterranean. Back in their country, they find themselves faced with a life even more difficult than when they left: riddled with debt, unemployed, broken by the tortures of their traffickers and by their stranded dreams, and victims of the glance of a society that nicknamed them "the returned ones" or the "deportees". (Photo by FATI ABUBAKAR / AFP)
TO GO WITH AN AFP STORY BY SOPHIE BOUILLON
EN_01387015_0187 AFP
A woman and her child rest on June 26, 2019 in Benin City, at one of the shelters of the Society For the Empowerment Of Young Persons (SEYP), an organisation that rehabilitates and reintegrates women returning from Libya carrying young children often born as the result of rape. - More than 14,000 young Nigerians, most of them between the ages of 17 and 35, have returned to their home country through the United Nations Voluntary Return programme, after living in hell in Libya, stranded during months, sometimes years, unable to turn around or cross the Mediterranean. Back in their country, they find themselves faced with a life even more difficult than when they left: riddled with debt, unemployed, broken by the tortures of their traffickers and by their stranded dreams, and victims of the glance of a society that nicknamed them "the returned ones" or the "deportees". (Photo by FATI ABUBAKAR / AFP)
TO GO WITH AN AFP STORY BY SOPHIE BOUILLON
EN_01387015_0188 AFP
A woman and her child rest on June 26, 2019 in Benin City, at one of the shelters of the Society For the Empowerment Of Young Persons (SEYP), an organisation that rehabilitates and reintegrates women returning from Libya carrying young children often born as the result of rape. - More than 14,000 young Nigerians, most of them between the ages of 17 and 35, have returned to their home country through the United Nations Voluntary Return programme, after living in hell in Libya, stranded during months, sometimes years, unable to turn around or cross the Mediterranean. Back in their country, they find themselves faced with a life even more difficult than when they left: riddled with debt, unemployed, broken by the tortures of their traffickers and by their stranded dreams, and victims of the glance of a society that nicknamed them "the returned ones" or the "deportees". (Photo by FATI ABUBAKAR / AFP)
TO GO WITH AN AFP STORY BY SOPHIE BOUILLON
EN_01387015_0189 AFP
A woman and her child look outside a window on June 26, 2019 in Benin City, while at one of the shelters of the Society For the Empowerment Of Young Persons (SEYP), an organisation that rehabilitates and reintegrates women returning from Libya carrying young children often born as the result of rape. - More than 14,000 young Nigerians, most of them between the ages of 17 and 35, have returned to their home country through the United Nations Voluntary Return programme, after living in hell in Libya, stranded during months, sometimes years, unable to turn around or cross the Mediterranean. Back in their country, they find themselves faced with a life even more difficult than when they left: riddled with debt, unemployed, broken by the tortures of their traffickers and by their stranded dreams, and victims of the glance of a society that nicknamed them "the returned ones" or the "deportees". (Photo by FATI ABUBAKAR / AFP)
TO GO WITH AN AFP STORY BY SOPHIE BOUILLON
EN_01387015_0190 AFP
A woman and her child stand by a door on June 26, 2019 in Benin City, at one of the shelters of the Society For the Empowerment Of Young Persons (SEYP), an organisation that rehabilitates and reintegrates women returning from Libya carrying young children often born as the result of rape. - More than 14,000 young Nigerians, most of them between the ages of 17 and 35, have returned to their home country through the United Nations Voluntary Return programme, after living in hell in Libya, stranded during months, sometimes years, unable to turn around or cross the Mediterranean. Back in their country, they find themselves faced with a life even more difficult than when they left: riddled with debt, unemployed, broken by the tortures of their traffickers and by their stranded dreams, and victims of the glance of a society that nicknamed them "the returned ones" or the "deportees". (Photo by FATI ABUBAKAR / AFP)
TO GO WITH AN AFP STORY BY SOPHIE BOUILLON
EN_01387015_0191 AFP
A woman and her child rest on June 26, 2019 in Benin City, at one of the shelters of the Society For the Empowerment Of Young Persons (SEYP), an organisation that rehabilitates and reintegrates women returning from Libya carrying young children often born as the result of rape. - More than 14,000 young Nigerians, most of them between the ages of 17 and 35, have returned to their home country through the United Nations Voluntary Return programme, after living in hell in Libya, stranded during months, sometimes years, unable to turn around or cross the Mediterranean. Back in their country, they find themselves faced with a life even more difficult than when they left: riddled with debt, unemployed, broken by the tortures of their traffickers and by their stranded dreams, and victims of the glance of a society that nicknamed them "the returned ones" or the "deportees". (Photo by FATI ABUBAKAR / AFP)
TO GO WITH AN AFP STORY BY SOPHIE BOUILLON
EN_01387015_0192 AFP
A woman and her child stand by a door on June 26, 2019 in Benin City, at one of the shelters of the Society For the Empowerment Of Young Persons (SEYP), an organisation that rehabilitates and reintegrates women returning from Libya carrying young children often born as the result of rape. - More than 14,000 young Nigerians, most of them between the ages of 17 and 35, have returned to their home country through the United Nations Voluntary Return programme, after living in hell in Libya, stranded during months, sometimes years, unable to turn around or cross the Mediterranean. Back in their country, they find themselves faced with a life even more difficult than when they left: riddled with debt, unemployed, broken by the tortures of their traffickers and by their stranded dreams, and victims of the glance of a society that nicknamed them "the returned ones" or the "deportees". (Photo by FATI ABUBAKAR / AFP)
TO GO WITH AN AFP STORY BY SOPHIE BOUILLON
EN_01387015_0193 AFP
A woman and her child rest on June 26, 2019 in Benin City, at one of the shelters of the Society For the Empowerment Of Young Persons (SEYP), an organisation that rehabilitates and reintegrates women returning from Libya carrying young children often born as the result of rape. - More than 14,000 young Nigerians, most of them between the ages of 17 and 35, have returned to their home country through the United Nations Voluntary Return programme, after living in hell in Libya, stranded during months, sometimes years, unable to turn around or cross the Mediterranean. Back in their country, they find themselves faced with a life even more difficult than when they left: riddled with debt, unemployed, broken by the tortures of their traffickers and by their stranded dreams, and victims of the glance of a society that nicknamed them "the returned ones" or the "deportees". (Photo by FATI ABUBAKAR / AFP)
TO GO WITH AN AFP STORY BY SOPHIE BOUILLON

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