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Jazydzi wciąż szukają informacji o swoich bliskich - AFP (31)

EN_01385424_0026 AFP
Iraq's Yazidi Jihan Qassem, 18, pauses as she talks to a AFP reporter at a makeshift house in an area housing many displaced people on the outskirts of the northwestern Iraqi town of Baadre on June 25, 2019. - Three children fathered by her Islamic State group husband. Three siblings missing since the Islamic State group ravaged her village in 2014. At 18, Yazidi survivor Jihan abandoned the former to honour the latter. The same gutwrenching dilemma has been faced by dozens of Yazidi women and girls forced to carry jihadists' children after IS abducted them from their ancestral Iraqi home of Sinjar in 2014. (Photo by SAFIN HAMED / AFP)
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EN_01385424_0027 AFP
Iraq's Yazidi Jihan Qassem, 18, prepares tea as she talks to a AFP reporter at a makeshift house in an area housing many displaced people on the outskirts of the northwestern Iraqi town of Baadre on June 25, 2019. - Three children fathered by her Islamic State group husband. Three siblings missing since the Islamic State group ravaged her village in 2014. At 18, Yazidi survivor Jihan abandoned the former to honour the latter. The same gutwrenching dilemma has been faced by dozens of Yazidi women and girls forced to carry jihadists' children after IS abducted them from their ancestral Iraqi home of Sinjar in 2014. (Photo by SAFIN HAMED / AFP)
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EN_01385424_0028 AFP
Iraq's Yazidi Jihan Qassem, 18, pauses as she talks to a AFP reporter at a makeshift house in an area housing many displaced people on the outskirts of the northwestern Iraqi town of Baadre on June 25, 2019. - Three children fathered by her Islamic State group husband. Three siblings missing since the Islamic State group ravaged her village in 2014. At 18, Yazidi survivor Jihan abandoned the former to honour the latter. The same gutwrenching dilemma has been faced by dozens of Yazidi women and girls forced to carry jihadists' children after IS abducted them from their ancestral Iraqi home of Sinjar in 2014. (Photo by SAFIN HAMED / AFP)
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EN_01385424_0029 AFP
Iraq's Yazidi Jihan Qassem, 18, pauses as she talks to a AFP reporter at a makeshift house in an area housing many displaced people on the outskirts of the northwestern Iraqi town of Baadre on June 25, 2019. - Three children fathered by her Islamic State group husband. Three siblings missing since the Islamic State group ravaged her village in 2014. At 18, Yazidi survivor Jihan abandoned the former to honour the latter. The same gutwrenching dilemma has been faced by dozens of Yazidi women and girls forced to carry jihadists' children after IS abducted them from their ancestral Iraqi home of Sinjar in 2014. (Photo by SAFIN HAMED / AFP)
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EN_01385424_0030 AFP
Iraq's Yazidi Jihan Qassem, 18, smiles as she talks to a AFP reporter at a makeshift house in an area housing many displaced people on the outskirts of the northwestern Iraqi town of Baadre on June 25, 2019. - Three children fathered by her Islamic State group husband. Three siblings missing since the Islamic State group ravaged her village in 2014. At 18, Yazidi survivor Jihan abandoned the former to honour the latter. The same gutwrenching dilemma has been faced by dozens of Yazidi women and girls forced to carry jihadists' children after IS abducted them from their ancestral Iraqi home of Sinjar in 2014. (Photo by SAFIN HAMED / AFP)
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EN_01385424_0031 AFP
Iraq's Yazidi Jihan Qassem, 18, pauses as she talks to a AFP reporter at a makeshift house in an area housing many displaced people on the outskirts of the northwestern Iraqi town of Baadre on June 25, 2019. - Three children fathered by her Islamic State group husband. Three siblings missing since the Islamic State group ravaged her village in 2014. At 18, Yazidi survivor Jihan abandoned the former to honour the latter. The same gutwrenching dilemma has been faced by dozens of Yazidi women and girls forced to carry jihadists' children after IS abducted them from their ancestral Iraqi home of Sinjar in 2014. (Photo by SAFIN HAMED / AFP)
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EN_01385424_0012 AFP
Iraq's Yazidi survivor Layleh Shemmo is pictured inside her tent in the Khonke camp for displaced persons in northwestern Iraq on June 24, 2019. - Working in the Khonke displacement camp in northwest Iraq, Shemmo glances down at the name tattooed on her left hand: Kero, her husband, still missing five years after the Islamic State group rampaged across the Sinjar region. At the time, IS killed Yazidi men en masse, took boys as child soldiers and sold women as "sex slaves," with survivors streaming into shabby displacement camps. (Photo by SAFIN HAMED / AFP)
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EN_01385424_0013 AFP
Iraq's Yazidi survivor Layleh Shemmo pauses as she talks with a reporter at her tent in the Khonke camp for displaced persons in northwestern Iraq on June 24, 2019. - Working in the Khonke displacement camp in northwest Iraq, Shemmo glances down at the name tattooed on her left hand: Kero, her husband, still missing five years after the Islamic State group rampaged across the Sinjar region. At the time, IS killed Yazidi men en masse, took boys as child soldiers and sold women as "sex slaves," with survivors streaming into shabby displacement camps. (Photo by SAFIN HAMED / AFP)
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EN_01385424_0014 AFP
Iraq's Yazidi survivor Layleh Shemmo talks with a reporter at her tent in the Khonke camp for displaced persons in northwestern Iraq on June 24, 2019. - Working in the Khonke displacement camp in northwest Iraq, Shemmo glances down at the name tattooed on her left hand: Kero, her husband, still missing five years after the Islamic State group rampaged across the Sinjar region. At the time, IS killed Yazidi men en masse, took boys as child soldiers and sold women as "sex slaves," with survivors streaming into shabby displacement camps. (Photo by SAFIN HAMED / AFP)
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EN_01385424_0015 AFP
Iraq's Yazidi survivor Layleh Shemmo displays her tatoo bearing the names of her two sons at a tent in the Khonke camp for displaced persons in northwestern Iraq on June 24, 2019. - Working in the Khonke displacement camp in northwest Iraq, Shemmo glances down at the name tattooed on her left hand: Kero, her husband, still missing five years after the Islamic State group rampaged across the Sinjar region. At the time, IS killed Yazidi men en masse, took boys as child soldiers and sold women as "sex slaves," with survivors streaming into shabby displacement camps. (Photo by SAFIN HAMED / AFP)
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EN_01385424_0016 AFP
Iraq's Yazidi survivor Layleh Shemmo sews inside her tent in the Khonke camp for displaced persons in northwestern Iraq on June 24, 2019. - Working in the Khonke displacement camp in northwest Iraq, Shemmo glances down at the name tattooed on her left hand: Kero, her husband, still missing five years after the Islamic State group rampaged across the Sinjar region. At the time, IS killed Yazidi men en masse, took boys as child soldiers and sold women as "sex slaves," with survivors streaming into shabby displacement camps. (Photo by SAFIN HAMED / AFP)
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EN_01385424_0017 AFP
Iraq's Yazidi survivor Layleh Shemmo sews inside her tent in the Khonke camp for displaced persons in northwestern Iraq on June 24, 2019. - Working in the Khonke displacement camp in northwest Iraq, Shemmo glances down at the name tattooed on her left hand: Kero, her husband, still missing five years after the Islamic State group rampaged across the Sinjar region. At the time, IS killed Yazidi men en masse, took boys as child soldiers and sold women as "sex slaves," with survivors streaming into shabby displacement camps. (Photo by SAFIN HAMED / AFP)
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EN_01385424_0018 AFP
Iraq's Yazidi survivor Layleh Shemmo looks at her tatoo bearing the names of her two sons at a tent in the Khonke camp for displaced persons in northwestern Iraq on June 24, 2019. - Working in the Khonke displacement camp in northwest Iraq, Shemmo glances down at the name tattooed on her left hand: Kero, her husband, still missing five years after the Islamic State group rampaged across the Sinjar region. At the time, IS killed Yazidi men en masse, took boys as child soldiers and sold women as "sex slaves," with survivors streaming into shabby displacement camps. (Photo by SAFIN HAMED / AFP)
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EN_01385424_0019 AFP
Iraq's Yazidi survivor Layleh Shemmo displays her tatoo bearing the date fighters from the Islamic State group entered the village of Sinjar, at her tent in the Khonke camp for displaced persons in northwestern Iraq on June 24, 2019. - Working in the Khonke displacement camp in northwest Iraq, Shemmo glances down at the name tattooed on her left hand: Kero, her husband, still missing five years after the Islamic State group rampaged across the Sinjar region. At the time, IS killed Yazidi men en masse, took boys as child soldiers and sold women as "sex slaves," with survivors streaming into shabby displacement camps. (Photo by SAFIN HAMED / AFP)
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EN_01385424_0020 AFP
Iraq's Yazidi survivor Layleh Shemmo smiles at her tent in the Khonke camp for displaced persons in northwestern Iraq on June 24, 2019. - Working in the Khonke displacement camp in northwest Iraq, Shemmo glances down at the name tattooed on her left hand: Kero, her husband, still missing five years after the Islamic State group rampaged across the Sinjar region. At the time, IS killed Yazidi men en masse, took boys as child soldiers and sold women as "sex slaves," with survivors streaming into shabby displacement camps. (Photo by SAFIN HAMED / AFP)
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EN_01385424_0021 AFP
Iraq's Yazidi seamstress Shirin Ghaliyeh, 39, smiles while working at her shop in the Khonke camp for displaced persons in northwestern Iraq on June 24, 2019. - Of the 550,000 Yazidis in Iraq before 2014 when the Islamic State group rampaged across the Sinjar region, around 100,000 have emigrated abroad and 360,000 remain internally displaced. (Photo by SAFIN HAMED / AFP)
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EN_01385424_0022 AFP
Iraq's Yazidi seamstress Shirin Ghaliyeh, 39, poses outside her shop in the Khonke camp for displaced persons in northwestern Iraq on June 24, 2019. - Of the 550,000 Yazidis in Iraq before 2014 when the Islamic State group rampaged across the Sinjar region, around 100,000 have emigrated abroad and 360,000 remain internally displaced. (Photo by SAFIN HAMED / AFP)
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EN_01385424_0023 AFP
Iraq's Yazidi Bashar Hamad, 51, sits at the Khonke camp for displaced persons in northwestern Iraq on June 24, 2019 as he speaks about his search for his younger brother Nawaf since the Islamic State group overran their villages in the Yazidi stronghold of Sinjar in 2014. - Last year, he and other relatives provided blood samples to Iraqi authorities, who hope to match the DNA with human remains exhumed from a dozen mass graves in northwest Iraq as part of a UN-backed investigation into Islamic State crimes. (Photo by SAFIN HAMED / AFP)
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EN_01385424_0024 AFP
Iraq's Yazidi Bashar Hamad, 51, sits at the Khonke camp for displaced persons in northwestern Iraq on June 24, 2019 as he speaks about his search for his younger brother Nawaf since the Islamic State group overran their villages in the Yazidi stronghold of Sinjar in 2014. - Last year, he and other relatives provided blood samples to Iraqi authorities, who hope to match the DNA with human remains exhumed from a dozen mass graves in northwest Iraq as part of a UN-backed investigation into Islamic State crimes. (Photo by SAFIN HAMED / AFP)
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EN_01385424_0025 AFP
Iraq's Yazidi Bashar Hamad, 51, sits at the Khonke camp for displaced persons in northwestern Iraq on June 24, 2019 as he speaks about his search for his younger brother Nawaf since the Islamic State group overran their villages in the Yazidi stronghold of Sinjar in 2014. - Last year, he and other relatives provided blood samples to Iraqi authorities, who hope to match the DNA with human remains exhumed from a dozen mass graves in northwest Iraq as part of a UN-backed investigation into Islamic State crimes. (Photo by SAFIN HAMED / AFP)
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EN_01385424_0001 AFP
Staff at Iraqi forensics lab Medico-Legal Directorate in eastern Baghdad inspect samples on June 19, 2019. - The bones, recently exhumed from mass graves in the Yazidi stronghold of Sinjar in northwest Iraq, will be compared with blood samples from surviving members of the community to help determine the fates of those still missing after the Islamic State group's 2014 sweep across their villages. Entire families were massacred, boys recruited to fight and women and girls forced into "sex slavery" in what the United Nations has said could amount to "genocide". (Photo by AHMAD AL-RUBAYE / AFP)
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EN_01385424_0002 AFP
Staff at Iraqi forensics lab Medico-Legal Directorate in eastern Baghdad inspect samples on June 19, 2019. - The bones, recently exhumed from mass graves in the Yazidi stronghold of Sinjar in northwest Iraq, will be compared with blood samples from surviving members of the community to help determine the fates of those still missing after the Islamic State group's 2014 sweep across their villages. Entire families were massacred, boys recruited to fight and women and girls forced into "sex slavery" in what the United Nations has said could amount to "genocide". (Photo by AHMAD AL-RUBAYE / AFP)
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EN_01385424_0003 AFP
Staff at Iraqi forensics lab Medico-Legal Directorate in eastern Baghdad inspect samples on June 19, 2019. - The bones, recently exhumed from mass graves in the Yazidi stronghold of Sinjar in northwest Iraq, will be compared with blood samples from surviving members of the community to help determine the fates of those still missing after the Islamic State group's 2014 sweep across their villages. Entire families were massacred, boys recruited to fight and women and girls forced into "sex slavery" in what the United Nations has said could amount to "genocide". (Photo by AHMAD AL-RUBAYE / AFP)
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EN_01385424_0004 AFP
Staff at Iraqi forensics lab Medico-Legal Directorate in eastern Baghdad inspect samples on June 19, 2019. - The bones, recently exhumed from mass graves in the Yazidi stronghold of Sinjar in northwest Iraq, will be compared with blood samples from surviving members of the community to help determine the fates of those still missing after the Islamic State group's 2014 sweep across their villages. Entire families were massacred, boys recruited to fight and women and girls forced into "sex slavery" in what the United Nations has said could amount to "genocide". (Photo by AHMAD AL-RUBAYE / AFP)
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EN_01385424_0005 AFP
Staff at Iraqi forensics lab Medico-Legal Directorate in eastern Baghdad inspect samples on June 19, 2019. - The bones, recently exhumed from mass graves in the Yazidi stronghold of Sinjar in northwest Iraq, will be compared with blood samples from surviving members of the community to help determine the fates of those still missing after the Islamic State group's 2014 sweep across their villages. Entire families were massacred, boys recruited to fight and women and girls forced into "sex slavery" in what the United Nations has said could amount to "genocide". (Photo by AHMAD AL-RUBAYE / AFP)
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EN_01385424_0006 AFP
Staff at Iraqi forensics lab Medico-Legal Directorate in eastern Baghdad inspect samples on June 19, 2019. - The bones, recently exhumed from mass graves in the Yazidi stronghold of Sinjar in northwest Iraq, will be compared with blood samples from surviving members of the community to help determine the fates of those still missing after the Islamic State group's 2014 sweep across their villages. Entire families were massacred, boys recruited to fight and women and girls forced into "sex slavery" in what the United Nations has said could amount to "genocide". (Photo by AHMAD AL-RUBAYE / AFP)
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EN_01385424_0007 AFP
Staff at Iraqi forensics lab Medico-Legal Directorate in eastern Baghdad inspect samples on June 19, 2019. - The bones, recently exhumed from mass graves in the Yazidi stronghold of Sinjar in northwest Iraq, will be compared with blood samples from surviving members of the community to help determine the fates of those still missing after the Islamic State group's 2014 sweep across their villages. Entire families were massacred, boys recruited to fight and women and girls forced into "sex slavery" in what the United Nations has said could amount to "genocide". (Photo by AHMAD AL-RUBAYE / AFP)
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EN_01385424_0008 AFP
Staff at Iraqi forensics lab Medico-Legal Directorate in eastern Baghdad inspect a bonne on June 19, 2019. - The bones, recently exhumed from mass graves in the Yazidi stronghold of Sinjar in northwest Iraq, will be compared with blood samples from surviving members of the community to help determine the fates of those still missing after the Islamic State group's 2014 sweep across their villages. Entire families were massacred, boys recruited to fight and women and girls forced into "sex slavery" in what the United Nations has said could amount to "genocide". (Photo by AHMAD AL-RUBAYE / AFP)
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EN_01385424_0009 AFP
Staff at Iraqi forensics lab Medico-Legal Directorate in eastern Baghdad inspect samples on June 19, 2019. - The bones, recently exhumed from mass graves in the Yazidi stronghold of Sinjar in northwest Iraq, will be compared with blood samples from surviving members of the community to help determine the fates of those still missing after the Islamic State group's 2014 sweep across their villages. Entire families were massacred, boys recruited to fight and women and girls forced into "sex slavery" in what the United Nations has said could amount to "genocide". (Photo by AHMAD AL-RUBAYE / AFP)
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EN_01385424_0010 AFP
Staff at Iraqi forensics lab Medico-Legal Directorate in eastern Baghdad inspect samples on June 19, 2019. - The bones, recently exhumed from mass graves in the Yazidi stronghold of Sinjar in northwest Iraq, will be compared with blood samples from surviving members of the community to help determine the fates of those still missing after the Islamic State group's 2014 sweep across their villages. Entire families were massacred, boys recruited to fight and women and girls forced into "sex slavery" in what the United Nations has said could amount to "genocide". (Photo by AHMAD AL-RUBAYE / AFP)
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EN_01385424_0011 AFP
Staff at Iraqi forensics lab Medico-Legal Directorate in eastern Baghdad inspect samples on June 19, 2019. - The bones, recently exhumed from mass graves in the Yazidi stronghold of Sinjar in northwest Iraq, will be compared with blood samples from surviving members of the community to help determine the fates of those still missing after the Islamic State group's 2014 sweep across their villages. Entire families were massacred, boys recruited to fight and women and girls forced into "sex slavery" in what the United Nations has said could amount to "genocide". (Photo by AHMAD AL-RUBAYE / AFP)
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