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Japoński papier Washi - AFP (22)

EN_01381881_0074 AFP
This picture taken on June 4, 2019 shows Takao Makino, head of the Kibi conservation studio, carefully applying "washi" onto a brush onto golden sticks representing the halo of a Buddhist statue estimated to be around 800 years old, in Saitama, outside Tokyo. - Once indispensible for the daily life of Japanese, washi -- literally "Japanese paper" -- was used not only for writing and painting but also for sliding doors, room dividers, lampshades and umbrellas. (Photo by Kazuhiro NOGI / AFP) / TO GO WITH Japan-culture-lifestyle,FEATURE by Natsuko FUKUE
TO GO WITH Japan-culture-lifestyle,FEATURE by Natsuko FUKUE
EN_01381881_0075 AFP
This picture taken on June 4, 2019 shows Takao Makino, head of the Kibi conservation studio, carefully applying "washi" onto a brush onto golden sticks representing the halo of a Buddhist statue estimated to be around 800 years old, in Saitama, outside Tokyo. - Once indispensible for the daily life of Japanese, washi -- literally "Japanese paper" -- was used not only for writing and painting but also for sliding doors, room dividers, lampshades and umbrellas. (Photo by Kazuhiro NOGI / AFP) / TO GO WITH Japan-culture-lifestyle,FEATURE by Natsuko FUKUE
TO GO WITH Japan-culture-lifestyle,FEATURE by Natsuko FUKUE
EN_01381881_0076 AFP
This picture taken on June 4, 2019 shows Takao Makino (L), head of Kibi conservation studio, repairing cultural property in Saitama, outside Tokyo. - Once indispensible for the daily life of Japanese, washi -- literally "Japanese paper" -- was used not only for writing and painting but also for sliding doors, room dividers, lampshades and umbrellas. (Photo by Kazuhiro NOGI / AFP) / TO GO WITH Japan-culture-lifestyle,FEATURE by Natsuko FUKUE
TO GO WITH Japan-culture-lifestyle,FEATURE by Natsuko FUKUE
EN_01381881_0077 AFP
This picture taken on June 4, 2019 shows Takao Makino, head of Kibi conservation studio, displaying a piece the world's thinnest "washi" paper used to repair cultural properties in Saitama, outside Tokyo. - Once indispensible for the daily life of Japanese, washi -- literally "Japanese paper" -- was used not only for writing and painting but also for sliding doors, room dividers, lampshades and umbrellas. (Photo by Kazuhiro NOGI / AFP) / TO GO WITH Japan-culture-lifestyle,FEATURE by Natsuko FUKUE
TO GO WITH Japan-culture-lifestyle,FEATURE by Natsuko FUKUE
EN_01381881_0078 AFP
This picture taken on June 4, 2019 shows a piece of the world's thinnest "washi" paper used to repair cultural properties in Saitama, outside Tokyo. - Once indispensible for the daily life of Japanese, washi -- literally "Japanese paper" -- was used not only for writing and painting but also for sliding doors, room dividers, lampshades and umbrellas. (Photo by Kazuhiro NOGI / AFP) / TO GO WITH Japan-culture-lifestyle,FEATURE by Natsuko FUKUE
TO GO WITH Japan-culture-lifestyle,FEATURE by Natsuko FUKUE
EN_01381881_0079 AFP
This picture taken on June 4, 2019 shows Takao Makino, head of the Kibi conservation studio, carefully applying "washi" onto a brush onto golden sticks representing the halo of a Buddhist statue estimated to be around 800 years old, in Saitama, outside Tokyo. - Once indispensible for the daily life of Japanese, washi -- literally "Japanese paper" -- was used not only for writing and painting but also for sliding doors, room dividers, lampshades and umbrellas. (Photo by Kazuhiro NOGI / AFP) / TO GO WITH Japan-culture-lifestyle,FEATURE by Natsuko FUKUE
TO GO WITH Japan-culture-lifestyle,FEATURE by Natsuko FUKUE
EN_01381881_0058 AFP
This picture taken on March 15, 2019 shows a worker boiling kozo plants at the beginning of the papermaking process at the Hidaka Washi factory in Hidaka, Kochi prefecture, some 640 kilometres (400 miles) southwest of Tokyo. - Once indispensible for the daily life of Japanese, washi -- literally "Japanese paper" -- was used not only for writing and painting but also for sliding doors, room dividers, lampshades and umbrellas. (Photo by Kazuhiro NOGI / AFP) / TO GO WITH Japan-culture-lifestyle,FEATURE by Natsuko FUKUE
TO GO WITH Japan-culture-lifestyle,FEATURE by Natsuko FUKUE
EN_01381881_0059 AFP
This picture taken on March 15, 2019 shows a worker removing impurities by hand in clear water during the "washi" paper manufacturing process at the Hidaka Washi factory in Hidaka, Kochi prefecture, some 640 kilometres (400 miles) southwest of Tokyo. - Once indispensible for the daily life of Japanese, washi -- literally "Japanese paper" -- was used not only for writing and painting but also for sliding doors, room dividers, lampshades and umbrellas. (Photo by Kazuhiro NOGI / AFP) / TO GO WITH Japan-culture-lifestyle,FEATURE by Natsuko FUKUE
TO GO WITH Japan-culture-lifestyle,FEATURE by Natsuko FUKUE
EN_01381881_0060 AFP
This picture taken on March 15, 2019 shows a worker removing impurities in a water tank during the "washi" paper manufacturing process at the Hidaka Washi factory in Hidaka, Kochi prefecture, some 640 kilometres (400 miles) southwest of Tokyo. - Once indispensible for the daily life of Japanese, washi -- literally "Japanese paper" -- was used not only for writing and painting but also for sliding doors, room dividers, lampshades and umbrellas. (Photo by Kazuhiro NOGI / AFP) / TO GO WITH Japan-culture-lifestyle,FEATURE by Natsuko FUKUE
TO GO WITH Japan-culture-lifestyle,FEATURE by Natsuko FUKUE
EN_01381881_0061 AFP
This picture taken on March 15, 2019 shows a worker removing impurities in a water tank during the "washi" paper manufacturing process at the Hidaka Washi factory in Hidaka, Kochi prefecture, some 640 kilometres (400 miles) southwest of Tokyo. - Once indispensible for the daily life of Japanese, washi -- literally "Japanese paper" -- was used not only for writing and painting but also for sliding doors, room dividers, lampshades and umbrellas. (Photo by Kazuhiro NOGI / AFP) / TO GO WITH Japan-culture-lifestyle,FEATURE by Natsuko FUKUE
TO GO WITH Japan-culture-lifestyle,FEATURE by Natsuko FUKUE
EN_01381881_0062 AFP
This picture taken on March 15, 2019 shows a worker removing impurities by hand in clear water during the "washi" paper manufacturing process at the Hidaka Washi factory in Hidaka, Kochi prefecture, some 640 kilometres (400 miles) southwest of Tokyo. - Once indispensible for the daily life of Japanese, washi -- literally "Japanese paper" -- was used not only for writing and painting but also for sliding doors, room dividers, lampshades and umbrellas. (Photo by Kazuhiro NOGI / AFP) / TO GO WITH Japan-culture-lifestyle,FEATURE by Natsuko FUKUE
TO GO WITH Japan-culture-lifestyle,FEATURE by Natsuko FUKUE
EN_01381881_0063 AFP
This picture taken on March 15, 2019 shows the world's thinnest "washi" paper at the Hidaka Washi factory in Hidaka, Kochi prefecture, some 640 kilometres (400 miles) southwest of Tokyo. - Once indispensible for the daily life of Japanese, washi -- literally "Japanese paper" -- was used not only for writing and painting but also for sliding doors, room dividers, lampshades and umbrellas. (Photo by Kazuhiro NOGI / AFP) / TO GO WITH Japan-culture-lifestyle,FEATURE by Natsuko FUKUE
TO GO WITH Japan-culture-lifestyle,FEATURE by Natsuko FUKUE
EN_01381881_0064 AFP
This picture taken on March 15, 2019 shows a worker checking the "washi" paper manufacturing process at the Hidaka Washi factory in Hidaka, Kochi prefecture, some 640 kilometres (400 miles) southwest of Tokyo. - Once indispensible for the daily life of Japanese, washi -- literally "Japanese paper" -- was used not only for writing and painting but also for sliding doors, room dividers, lampshades and umbrellas. (Photo by Kazuhiro NOGI / AFP) / TO GO WITH Japan-culture-lifestyle,FEATURE by Natsuko FUKUE
TO GO WITH Japan-culture-lifestyle,FEATURE by Natsuko FUKUE
EN_01381881_0065 AFP
This picture taken on March 15, 2019 shows a worker putting steamed kozo plants in a water tank during the "washi" paper manufacturing process at the Hidaka Washi factory in Hidaka, Kochi prefecture, some 640 kilometres (400 miles) southwest of Tokyo. - Once indispensible for the daily life of Japanese, washi -- literally "Japanese paper" -- was used not only for writing and painting but also for sliding doors, room dividers, lampshades and umbrellas. (Photo by Kazuhiro NOGI / AFP) / TO GO WITH Japan-culture-lifestyle,FEATURE by Natsuko FUKUE
TO GO WITH Japan-culture-lifestyle,FEATURE by Natsuko FUKUE
EN_01381881_0066 AFP
This picture taken on March 15, 2019 shows a worker pouring water on steamed kozo plants during the "washi" paper manufacturing process at the Hidaka Washi factory in Hidaka, Kochi prefecture, some 640 kilometres (400 miles) southwest of Tokyo. - Once indispensible for the daily life of Japanese, washi -- literally "Japanese paper" -- was used not only for writing and painting but also for sliding doors, room dividers, lampshades and umbrellas. (Photo by Kazuhiro NOGI / AFP) / TO GO WITH Japan-culture-lifestyle,FEATURE by Natsuko FUKUE
TO GO WITH Japan-culture-lifestyle,FEATURE by Natsuko FUKUE
EN_01381881_0067 AFP
This picture taken on March 15, 2019 shows a worker standing behind the world's thinnest "washi" paper at the Hidaka Washi factory in Hidaka, Kochi prefecture, some 640 kilometres (400 miles) southwest of Tokyo. - Once indispensible for the daily life of Japanese, washi -- literally "Japanese paper" -- was used not only for writing and painting but also for sliding doors, room dividers, lampshades and umbrellas. (Photo by Kazuhiro NOGI / AFP) / TO GO WITH Japan-culture-lifestyle,FEATURE by Natsuko FUKUE
TO GO WITH Japan-culture-lifestyle,FEATURE by Natsuko FUKUE
EN_01381881_0068 AFP
This picture taken on March 15, 2019 shows Hidaka Washi president Hiroyoshi Chinzei, a fourth-generation traditional paper maker, displaying the world's thinnest paper at his factory in Hidaka, Kochi prefecture, some 640 kilometres (400 miles) southwest of Tokyo. - Once indispensible for the daily life of Japanese, washi -- literally "Japanese paper" -- was used not only for writing and painting but also for sliding doors, room dividers, lampshades and umbrellas. (Photo by Kazuhiro NOGI / AFP) / TO GO WITH Japan-culture-lifestyle,FEATURE by Natsuko FUKUE
TO GO WITH Japan-culture-lifestyle,FEATURE by Natsuko FUKUE
EN_01381881_0069 AFP
This picture taken on March 15, 2019 shows a worker putting steamed kozo plants in a water tank during the "washi" paper manufacturing process at the Hidaka Washi factory in Hidaka, Kochi prefecture, some 640 kilometres (400 miles) southwest of Tokyo. - Once indispensible for the daily life of Japanese, washi -- literally "Japanese paper" -- was used not only for writing and painting but also for sliding doors, room dividers, lampshades and umbrellas. (Photo by Kazuhiro NOGI / AFP) / TO GO WITH Japan-culture-lifestyle,FEATURE by Natsuko FUKUE
TO GO WITH Japan-culture-lifestyle,FEATURE by Natsuko FUKUE
EN_01381881_0070 AFP
This picture taken on March 15, 2019 shows a worker putting steamed kozo plants in a water tank during the "washi" paper manufacturing process at the Hidaka Washi factory in Hidaka, Kochi prefecture, some 640 kilometres (400 miles) southwest of Tokyo. - Once indispensible for the daily life of Japanese, washi -- literally "Japanese paper" -- was used not only for writing and painting but also for sliding doors, room dividers, lampshades and umbrellas. (Photo by Kazuhiro NOGI / AFP) / TO GO WITH Japan-culture-lifestyle,FEATURE by Natsuko FUKUE
TO GO WITH Japan-culture-lifestyle,FEATURE by Natsuko FUKUE
EN_01381881_0071 AFP
This picture taken on March 15, 2019 shows the plant called kozo, or mulberry, used for Japanese traditional "washi" paper manufacturing, at the Hidaka Washi factory in Hidaka, Kochi prefecture, some 640 kilometres (400 miles) southwest of Tokyo. - Once indispensible for the daily life of Japanese, washi -- literally "Japanese paper" -- was used not only for writing and painting but also for sliding doors, room dividers, lampshades and umbrellas. (Photo by Kazuhiro NOGI / AFP) / TO GO WITH Japan-culture-lifestyle,FEATURE by Natsuko FUKUE
TO GO WITH Japan-culture-lifestyle,FEATURE by Natsuko FUKUE
EN_01381881_0072 AFP
This picture taken on March 15, 2019 shows Hiroyoshi Chinzei, president of Hidaka Washi, a fourth-generation traditional paper maker, checking the "washi" paper manufacturing process at his factory in Hidaka, Kochi prefecture, some 640 kilometres (400 miles) southwest of Tokyo. - Once indispensible for the daily life of Japanese, washi -- literally "Japanese paper" -- was used not only for writing and painting but also for sliding doors, room dividers, lampshades and umbrellas. (Photo by Kazuhiro NOGI / AFP) / TO GO WITH Japan-culture-lifestyle,FEATURE by Natsuko FUKUE
TO GO WITH Japan-culture-lifestyle,FEATURE by Natsuko FUKUE
EN_01381881_0073 AFP
This picture taken on March 15, 2019 shows a worker checking a roll of the world's thinnest "washi" paper at the Hidaka Washi factory in Hidaka, Kochi prefecture, some 640 kilometres (400 miles) southwest of Tokyo. - Once indispensible for the daily life of Japanese, washi -- literally "Japanese paper" -- was used not only for writing and painting but also for sliding doors, room dividers, lampshades and umbrellas. (Photo by Kazuhiro NOGI / AFP) / TO GO WITH Japan-culture-lifestyle,FEATURE by Natsuko FUKUE
TO GO WITH Japan-culture-lifestyle,FEATURE by Natsuko FUKUE

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