Thursday, September 19, 2019
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Brytyjski jeniec wojenny w polskim obozie (18)

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POLAND: Jackson conducting the band in one of the camps. He brought an inkling of joyr to the most dismal days of people's lives. A BRUTALLY honest account by a WWII prisoner of war describes the gut-wrenching treatment British soldiers received in German camps, bringing joy in abysmal conditions to thousands of POWs through music, and the crippling realisation that hundreds of thousands of Jews were being callously murdered just a short distance from his camp. In April 1940 Drum Major Henry Barnes Jackson, nicknamed ???Drummie???, stepped off a ship at Le Havre, France ??" the same port he was docked at some 25 years earlier when he ran away from home to fight for Britain in the Great War, despite being underage, and spent three years striving to survive in the dank, muddy trenches that became his home. Now a father of four and proud husband at the ???ripe old age??? of 40, Jackson was once again donning a uniform and preparing to fight for his country against the Germans. Carrying his music case with him ??" as he was a talented band leader and practiced musician on any number of instruments ??" and his beloved war diary, Jackson was set to spend the war offering medical assistance to injured soldiers. However, his story would prove to be very different. Jackson would see out most of the Second World War in various prison camps across Poland, entertaining troops and Nazis with his musical talents. Mediadrumimages/HenryBarnesJackson/JaciByrne
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POLAND: Jackson (seated centre) holding his battalion???s (BAB 21) pet kitten outside the barracks, Blechammer 1943. A BRUTALLY honest account by a WWII prisoner of war describes the gut-wrenching treatment British soldiers received in German camps, bringing joy in abysmal conditions to thousands of POWs through music, and the crippling realisation that hundreds of thousands of Jews were being callously murdered just a short distance from his camp. In April 1940 Drum Major Henry Barnes Jackson, nicknamed ???Drummie???, stepped off a ship at Le Havre, France ??" the same port he was docked at some 25 years earlier when he ran away from home to fight for Britain in the Great War, despite being underage, and spent three years striving to survive in the dank, muddy trenches that became his home. Now a father of four and proud husband at the ???ripe old age??? of 40, Jackson was once again donning a uniform and preparing to fight for his country against the Germans. Carrying his music case with him ??" as he was a talented band leader and practiced musician on any number of instruments ??" and his beloved war diary, Jackson was set to spend the war offering medical assistance to injured soldiers. However, his story would prove to be very different. Jackson would see out most of the Second World War in various prison camps across Poland, entertaining troops and Nazis with his musical talents. Mediadrumimages/HenryBarnesJackson/JaciByrne
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POLAND: Jackson (front row, second from left) and his first band. Camp Warthelager, 1941. A BRUTALLY honest account by a WWII prisoner of war describes the gut-wrenching treatment British soldiers received in German camps, bringing joy in abysmal conditions to thousands of POWs through music, and the crippling realisation that hundreds of thousands of Jews were being callously murdered just a short distance from his camp. In April 1940 Drum Major Henry Barnes Jackson, nicknamed ???Drummie???, stepped off a ship at Le Havre, France ??" the same port he was docked at some 25 years earlier when he ran away from home to fight for Britain in the Great War, despite being underage, and spent three years striving to survive in the dank, muddy trenches that became his home. Now a father of four and proud husband at the ???ripe old age??? of 40, Jackson was once again donning a uniform and preparing to fight for his country against the Germans. Carrying his music case with him ??" as he was a talented band leader and practiced musician on any number of instruments ??" and his beloved war diary, Jackson was set to spend the war offering medical assistance to injured soldiers. However, his story would prove to be very different. Jackson would see out most of the Second World War in various prison camps across Poland, entertaining troops and Nazis with his musical talents. Mediadrumimages/HenryBarnesJackson/JaciByrne
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POLAND: With only one meal of soup a day, the POWs relied on Red Cross parcels to survive. Jackson (sitting highest) wrote in his diary: ???God bless the Red Cross!???. A BRUTALLY honest account by a WWII prisoner of war describes the gut-wrenching treatment British soldiers received in German camps, bringing joy in abysmal conditions to thousands of POWs through music, and the crippling realisation that hundreds of thousands of Jews were being callously murdered just a short distance from his camp. In April 1940 Drum Major Henry Barnes Jackson, nicknamed ???Drummie???, stepped off a ship at Le Havre, France ??" the same port he was docked at some 25 years earlier when he ran away from home to fight for Britain in the Great War, despite being underage, and spent three years striving to survive in the dank, muddy trenches that became his home. Now a father of four and proud husband at the ???ripe old age??? of 40, Jackson was once again donning a uniform and preparing to fight for his country against the Germans. Carrying his music case with him ??" as he was a talented band leader and practiced musician on any number of instruments ??" and his beloved war diary, Jackson was set to spend the war offering medical assistance to injured soldiers. However, his story would prove to be very different. Jackson would see out most of the Second World War in various prison camps across Poland, entertaining troops and Nazis with his musical talents. Mediadrumimages/HenryBarnesJackson/JaciByrne
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POLAND: POW Camp Warthelager, Poland, in snow. Jackson was interned here from October 1940 ??" March 1942. A BRUTALLY honest account by a WWII prisoner of war describes the gut-wrenching treatment British soldiers received in German camps, bringing joy in abysmal conditions to thousands of POWs through music, and the crippling realisation that hundreds of thousands of Jews were being callously murdered just a short distance from his camp. In April 1940 Drum Major Henry Barnes Jackson, nicknamed ???Drummie???, stepped off a ship at Le Havre, France ??" the same port he was docked at some 25 years earlier when he ran away from home to fight for Britain in the Great War, despite being underage, and spent three years striving to survive in the dank, muddy trenches that became his home. Now a father of four and proud husband at the ???ripe old age??? of 40, Jackson was once again donning a uniform and preparing to fight for his country against the Germans. Carrying his music case with him ??" as he was a talented band leader and practiced musician on any number of instruments ??" and his beloved war diary, Jackson was set to spend the war offering medical assistance to injured soldiers. However, his story would prove to be very different. Jackson would see out most of the Second World War in various prison camps across Poland, entertaining troops and Nazis with his musical talents. Mediadrumimages/HenryBarnesJackson/JaciByrne
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POLAND: Jackson???s ???girls??? showing their appreciation for their director onstage. A BRUTALLY honest account by a WWII prisoner of war describes the gut-wrenching treatment British soldiers received in German camps, bringing joy in abysmal conditions to thousands of POWs through music, and the crippling realisation that hundreds of thousands of Jews were being callously murdered just a short distance from his camp. In April 1940 Drum Major Henry Barnes Jackson, nicknamed ???Drummie???, stepped off a ship at Le Havre, France ??" the same port he was docked at some 25 years earlier when he ran away from home to fight for Britain in the Great War, despite being underage, and spent three years striving to survive in the dank, muddy trenches that became his home. Now a father of four and proud husband at the ???ripe old age??? of 40, Jackson was once again donning a uniform and preparing to fight for his country against the Germans. Carrying his music case with him ??" as he was a talented band leader and practiced musician on any number of instruments ??" and his beloved war diary, Jackson was set to spend the war offering medical assistance to injured soldiers. However, his story would prove to be very different. Jackson would see out most of the Second World War in various prison camps across Poland, entertaining troops and Nazis with his musical talents. Mediadrumimages/HenryBarnesJackson/JaciByrne
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POLAND: Finally, to Jackson???s delight, the first musical instruments arrived from The Red Cross. Camp Warthelager, May 1941. "Where there's music, there's hope," said Jackson. A BRUTALLY honest account by a WWII prisoner of war describes the gut-wrenching treatment British soldiers received in German camps, bringing joy in abysmal conditions to thousands of POWs through music, and the crippling realisation that hundreds of thousands of Jews were being callously murdered just a short distance from his camp. In April 1940 Drum Major Henry Barnes Jackson, nicknamed ???Drummie???, stepped off a ship at Le Havre, France ??" the same port he was docked at some 25 years earlier when he ran away from home to fight for Britain in the Great War, despite being underage, and spent three years striving to survive in the dank, muddy trenches that became his home. Now a father of four and proud husband at the ???ripe old age??? of 40, Jackson was once again donning a uniform and preparing to fight for his country against the Germans. Carrying his music case with him ??" as he was a talented band leader and practiced musician on any number of instruments ??" and his beloved war diary, Jackson was set to spend the war offering medical assistance to injured soldiers. However, his story would prove to be very different. Jackson would see out most of the Second World War in various prison camps across Poland, entertaining troops and Nazis with his musical talents. Mediadrumimages/HenryBarnesJackson/JaciByrne
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POLAND: When Jackson???s wife Mabel finally heard news of his capture, she sent this photograph in January 1941. He treasured it throughout the war. Clockwise from Mabel (centre): the youngest and the author???s mother, Joan; next youngest, Betty, second eldest, Mona and eldest, Nellie. A BRUTALLY honest account by a WWII prisoner of war describes the gut-wrenching treatment British soldiers received in German camps, bringing joy in abysmal conditions to thousands of POWs through music, and the crippling realisation that hundreds of thousands of Jews were being callously murdered just a short distance from his camp. In April 1940 Drum Major Henry Barnes Jackson, nicknamed ???Drummie???, stepped off a ship at Le Havre, France ??" the same port he was docked at some 25 years earlier when he ran away from home to fight for Britain in the Great War, despite being underage, and spent three years striving to survive in the dank, muddy trenches that became his home. Now a father of four and proud husband at the ???ripe old age??? of 40, Jackson was once again donning a uniform and preparing to fight for his country against the Germans. Carrying his music case with him ??" as he was a talented band leader and practiced musician on any number of instruments ??" and his beloved war diary, Jackson was set to spend the war offering medical assistance to injured soldiers. However, his story would prove to be very different. Jackson would see out most of the Second World War in various prison camps across Poland, entertaining troops and Nazis with his musical talents. Mediadrumimages/HenryBarnesJackson/JaciByrne
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POLAND: Henry (Harry) Barnes Jackson and his beloved wife, Mabel. A BRUTALLY honest account by a WWII prisoner of war describes the gut-wrenching treatment British soldiers received in German camps, bringing joy in abysmal conditions to thousands of POWs through music, and the crippling realisation that hundreds of thousands of Jews were being callously murdered just a short distance from his camp. In April 1940 Drum Major Henry Barnes Jackson, nicknamed ???Drummie???, stepped off a ship at Le Havre, France ??" the same port he was docked at some 25 years earlier when he ran away from home to fight for Britain in the Great War, despite being underage, and spent three years striving to survive in the dank, muddy trenches that became his home. Now a father of four and proud husband at the ???ripe old age??? of 40, Jackson was once again donning a uniform and preparing to fight for his country against the Germans. Carrying his music case with him ??" as he was a talented band leader and practiced musician on any number of instruments ??" and his beloved war diary, Jackson was set to spend the war offering medical assistance to injured soldiers. However, his story would prove to be very different. Jackson would see out most of the Second World War in various prison camps across Poland, entertaining troops and Nazis with his musical talents. Mediadrumimages/HenryBarnesJackson/JaciByrne
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POLAND: The start of many POW funerals attended by Jackson during his time in concentration camps throughout Poland. A BRUTALLY honest account by a WWII prisoner of war describes the gut-wrenching treatment British soldiers received in German camps, bringing joy in abysmal conditions to thousands of POWs through music, and the crippling realisation that hundreds of thousands of Jews were being callously murdered just a short distance from his camp. In April 1940 Drum Major Henry Barnes Jackson, nicknamed ???Drummie???, stepped off a ship at Le Havre, France ??" the same port he was docked at some 25 years earlier when he ran away from home to fight for Britain in the Great War, despite being underage, and spent three years striving to survive in the dank, muddy trenches that became his home. Now a father of four and proud husband at the ???ripe old age??? of 40, Jackson was once again donning a uniform and preparing to fight for his country against the Germans. Carrying his music case with him ??" as he was a talented band leader and practiced musician on any number of instruments ??" and his beloved war diary, Jackson was set to spend the war offering medical assistance to injured soldiers. However, his story would prove to be very different. Jackson would see out most of the Second World War in various prison camps across Poland, entertaining troops and Nazis with his musical talents. Mediadrumimages/HenryBarnesJackson/JaciByrne
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POLAND: Jackson proudly posing on horseback despite being underage at sixteen, 1915. A BRUTALLY honest account by a WWII prisoner of war describes the gut-wrenching treatment British soldiers received in German camps, bringing joy in abysmal conditions to thousands of POWs through music, and the crippling realisation that hundreds of thousands of Jews were being callously murdered just a short distance from his camp. In April 1940 Drum Major Henry Barnes Jackson, nicknamed ???Drummie???, stepped off a ship at Le Havre, France ??" the same port he was docked at some 25 years earlier when he ran away from home to fight for Britain in the Great War, despite being underage, and spent three years striving to survive in the dank, muddy trenches that became his home. Now a father of four and proud husband at the ???ripe old age??? of 40, Jackson was once again donning a uniform and preparing to fight for his country against the Germans. Carrying his music case with him ??" as he was a talented band leader and practiced musician on any number of instruments ??" and his beloved war diary, Jackson was set to spend the war offering medical assistance to injured soldiers. However, his story would prove to be very different. Jackson would see out most of the Second World War in various prison camps across Poland, entertaining troops and Nazis with his musical talents. Mediadrumimages/HenryBarnesJackson/JaciByrne
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POLAND: Jackson (centre) relaxing with wife Mabel (left), and family and friends, 1947. A BRUTALLY honest account by a WWII prisoner of war describes the gut-wrenching treatment British soldiers received in German camps, bringing joy in abysmal conditions to thousands of POWs through music, and the crippling realisation that hundreds of thousands of Jews were being callously murdered just a short distance from his camp. In April 1940 Drum Major Henry Barnes Jackson, nicknamed ???Drummie???, stepped off a ship at Le Havre, France ??" the same port he was docked at some 25 years earlier when he ran away from home to fight for Britain in the Great War, despite being underage, and spent three years striving to survive in the dank, muddy trenches that became his home. Now a father of four and proud husband at the ???ripe old age??? of 40, Jackson was once again donning a uniform and preparing to fight for his country against the Germans. Carrying his music case with him ??" as he was a talented band leader and practiced musician on any number of instruments ??" and his beloved war diary, Jackson was set to spend the war offering medical assistance to injured soldiers. However, his story would prove to be very different. Jackson would see out most of the Second World War in various prison camps across Poland, entertaining troops and Nazis with his musical talents. Mediadrumimages/HenryBarnesJackson/JaciByrne
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POLAND: Jackson, the Nazis??? kapellmeister sitting centre stage with his band in Blechhammer POW Camp (1942 ??" 1944). A BRUTALLY honest account by a WWII prisoner of war describes the gut-wrenching treatment British soldiers received in German camps, bringing joy in abysmal conditions to thousands of POWs through music, and the crippling realisation that hundreds of thousands of Jews were being callously murdered just a short distance from his camp. In April 1940 Drum Major Henry Barnes Jackson, nicknamed ???Drummie???, stepped off a ship at Le Havre, France ??" the same port he was docked at some 25 years earlier when he ran away from home to fight for Britain in the Great War, despite being underage, and spent three years striving to survive in the dank, muddy trenches that became his home. Now a father of four and proud husband at the ???ripe old age??? of 40, Jackson was once again donning a uniform and preparing to fight for his country against the Germans. Carrying his music case with him ??" as he was a talented band leader and practiced musician on any number of instruments ??" and his beloved war diary, Jackson was set to spend the war offering medical assistance to injured soldiers. However, his story would prove to be very different. Jackson would see out most of the Second World War in various prison camps across Poland, entertaining troops and Nazis with his musical talents. Mediadrumimages/HenryBarnesJackson/JaciByrne
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POLAND: Circulated throughout Nazi concentration camps, The Camp, was a propaganda newspaper aimed at intimidation. It contained such tragic photographs as this one taken at Buchenwald. It appears the victims are Jews. A BRUTALLY honest account by a WWII prisoner of war describes the gut-wrenching treatment British soldiers received in German camps, bringing joy in abysmal conditions to thousands of POWs through music, and the crippling realisation that hundreds of thousands of Jews were being callously murdered just a short distance from his camp. In April 1940 Drum Major Henry Barnes Jackson, nicknamed ???Drummie???, stepped off a ship at Le Havre, France ??" the same port he was docked at some 25 years earlier when he ran away from home to fight for Britain in the Great War, despite being underage, and spent three years striving to survive in the dank, muddy trenches that became his home. Now a father of four and proud husband at the ???ripe old age??? of 40, Jackson was once again donning a uniform and preparing to fight for his country against the Germans. Carrying his music case with him ??" as he was a talented band leader and practiced musician on any number of instruments ??" and his beloved war diary, Jackson was set to spend the war offering medical assistance to injured soldiers. However, his story would prove to be very different. Jackson would see out most of the Second World War in various prison camps across Poland, entertaining troops and Nazis with his musical talents. Mediadrumimages/HenryBarnesJackson/JaciByrne
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POLAND: Jackson playing the Last Post at yet another POW funeral, Blechhammer. A BRUTALLY honest account by a WWII prisoner of war describes the gut-wrenching treatment British soldiers received in German camps, bringing joy in abysmal conditions to thousands of POWs through music, and the crippling realisation that hundreds of thousands of Jews were being callously murdered just a short distance from his camp. In April 1940 Drum Major Henry Barnes Jackson, nicknamed ???Drummie???, stepped off a ship at Le Havre, France ??" the same port he was docked at some 25 years earlier when he ran away from home to fight for Britain in the Great War, despite being underage, and spent three years striving to survive in the dank, muddy trenches that became his home. Now a father of four and proud husband at the ???ripe old age??? of 40, Jackson was once again donning a uniform and preparing to fight for his country against the Germans. Carrying his music case with him ??" as he was a talented band leader and practiced musician on any number of instruments ??" and his beloved war diary, Jackson was set to spend the war offering medical assistance to injured soldiers. However, his story would prove to be very different. Jackson would see out most of the Second World War in various prison camps across Poland, entertaining troops and Nazis with his musical talents. Mediadrumimages/HenryBarnesJackson/JaciByrne
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POLAND: Another POW funeral. Jackson was often a coffin bearer and bugler for the Last Post and Reveille. A BRUTALLY honest account by a WWII prisoner of war describes the gut-wrenching treatment British soldiers received in German camps, bringing joy in abysmal conditions to thousands of POWs through music, and the crippling realisation that hundreds of thousands of Jews were being callously murdered just a short distance from his camp. In April 1940 Drum Major Henry Barnes Jackson, nicknamed ???Drummie???, stepped off a ship at Le Havre, France ??" the same port he was docked at some 25 years earlier when he ran away from home to fight for Britain in the Great War, despite being underage, and spent three years striving to survive in the dank, muddy trenches that became his home. Now a father of four and proud husband at the ???ripe old age??? of 40, Jackson was once again donning a uniform and preparing to fight for his country against the Germans. Carrying his music case with him ??" as he was a talented band leader and practiced musician on any number of instruments ??" and his beloved war diary, Jackson was set to spend the war offering medical assistance to injured soldiers. However, his story would prove to be very different. Jackson would see out most of the Second World War in various prison camps across Poland, entertaining troops and Nazis with his musical talents. Mediadrumimages/HenryBarnesJackson/JaciByrne
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POLAND: POWs eagerly watching band practice led by Jackson, who often covered up escapes by replacing band members. A BRUTALLY honest account by a WWII prisoner of war describes the gut-wrenching treatment British soldiers received in German camps, bringing joy in abysmal conditions to thousands of POWs through music, and the crippling realisation that hundreds of thousands of Jews were being callously murdered just a short distance from his camp. In April 1940 Drum Major Henry Barnes Jackson, nicknamed ???Drummie???, stepped off a ship at Le Havre, France ??" the same port he was docked at some 25 years earlier when he ran away from home to fight for Britain in the Great War, despite being underage, and spent three years striving to survive in the dank, muddy trenches that became his home. Now a father of four and proud husband at the ???ripe old age??? of 40, Jackson was once again donning a uniform and preparing to fight for his country against the Germans. Carrying his music case with him ??" as he was a talented band leader and practiced musician on any number of instruments ??" and his beloved war diary, Jackson was set to spend the war offering medical assistance to injured soldiers. However, his story would prove to be very different. Jackson would see out most of the Second World War in various prison camps across Poland, entertaining troops and Nazis with his musical talents. Mediadrumimages/HenryBarnesJackson/JaciByrne
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POLAND: A ghostly photograph of Jackson and his band preparing to perform for the Nazis at Blechhammer, part of the Auschwitz concentration camp complex, March 1943. The Britis referred to Auschwitz as Heaven Camp as nobody left it alive. A BRUTALLY honest account by a WWII prisoner of war describes the gut-wrenching treatment British soldiers received in German camps, bringing joy in abysmal conditions to thousands of POWs through music, and the crippling realisation that hundreds of thousands of Jews were being callously murdered just a short distance from his camp. In April 1940 Drum Major Henry Barnes Jackson, nicknamed ???Drummie???, stepped off a ship at Le Havre, France ??" the same port he was docked at some 25 years earlier when he ran away from home to fight for Britain in the Great War, despite being underage, and spent three years striving to survive in the dank, muddy trenches that became his home. Now a father of four and proud husband at the ???ripe old age??? of 40, Jackson was once again donning a uniform and preparing to fight for his country against the Germans. Carrying his music case with him ??" as he was a talented band leader and practiced musician on any number of instruments ??" and his beloved war diary, Jackson was set to spend the war offering medical assistance to injured soldiers. However, his story would prove to be very different. Jackson would see out most of the Second World War in various prison camps across Poland, entertaining troops and Nazis with his musical talents. Mediadrumimages/HenryBarnesJackson/JaciByrne

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