Wednesday, June 19, 2019
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Rozliczenia z krwawą niedzielą w Irlandii (13)

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Linda Nash poses with a photo of her brother William Nash, who died during Bloody Sunday, following a press conference in reaction to today's Bloody Sunday prosecution announcement at Guildhall on March 14, 2019 in Londonderry, Northern Ireland. Today, the Public Prosecution Service announced that one out of the seventeen soldiers accused of murdering the civilians killed on Bloody Sunday will face prosecution.
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Linda Nash (L) holds a photo of her brother William Nash as she poses with her sister Kate Nash, who holds a picture of their father Alex Nash, following a press conference in reaction to today's Bloody Sunday prosecution announcement on March 14, 2019 in Londonderry, Northern Ireland. Michael Nash was shot an killed during the events of Bloody Sunday, whilst his father Alex Nash was seriously wounded. Today, the Public Prosecution Service announced that one out of the seventeen soldiers accused of murdering the civilians killed on Bloody Sunday will face prosecution.
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Crowds outside City Hotel in Derry after receiving the news that only former British paratrooper is to be charged in connection with the killings of civil rights demonstrators in Northern Ireland on Bloody Sunday in January 1972. Bloody Sunday was an incident on 30 January 1972 in the Bogside area of Derry, Northern Ireland, when British soldiers shot 28 unarmed civilians during a protest march against internment. Fourteen people died: thirteen were killed outright, while the death of another man four months later was attributed to his injuries. Many of the victims were shot while fleeing from the soldiers and some were shot while trying to help the wounded. Other protesters were injured by rubber bullets or batons, and two were run down by army vehicles. The march had been organized by the Northern Ireland Civil Rights Association (NICRA). The soldiers involved were members of the 1st Battalion, Parachute Regiment, also known as "1 Para".
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Families of those who died on Bloody Sunday at a press conference at the Guildhall to give their reaction to the announcement that only one former British paratrooper is to be charged in connection with the killings of civil rights demonstrators in Northern Ireland on Bloody Sunday in January 1972. Bloody Sunday was an incident on 30 January 1972 in the Bogside area of Derry, Northern Ireland, when British soldiers shot 28 unarmed civilians during a protest march against internment. Fourteen people died: thirteen were killed outright, while the death of another man four months later was attributed to his injuries. Many of the victims were shot while fleeing from the soldiers and some were shot while trying to help the wounded. Other protesters were injured by rubber bullets or batons, and two were run down by army vehicles. The march had been organized by the Northern Ireland Civil Rights Association (NICRA). The soldiers involved were members of the 1st Battalion, Parachute Regiment, also known as "1 Para".
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inda Nash poses with a photo of her brother William Nash, who died during Bloody Sunday, following a press conference in reaction to today's Bloody Sunday prosecution announcement at Guildhall on March 14, 2019 in Londonderry, Northern Ireland. Today, the Public Prosecution Service announced that one out of the seventeen soldiers accused of murdering the civilians killed on Bloody Sunday will face prosecution.
MINIMUM PRICE $100
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Families of those who died on Bloody Sunday march through the Bogside in Derry ahead of an announcement over the prosecution of 17 former British soldiers and two former members of the Official IRA in connection with the events in the city in January 1972. Bloody Sunday was an incident on 30 January 1972 in the Bogside area of Derry, Northern Ireland, when British soldiers shot 28 unarmed civilians during a protest march against internment. Fourteen people died: thirteen were killed outright, while the death of another man four months later was attributed to his injuries. Many of the victims were shot while fleeing from the soldiers and some were shot while trying to help the wounded. Other protesters were injured by rubber bullets or batons, and two were run down by army vehicles. The march had been organized by the Northern Ireland Civil Rights Association (NICRA). The soldiers involved were members of the 1st Battalion, Parachute Regiment, also known as "1 Para".
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Families of those who died on Bloody Sunday at a press conference at the Guildhall to give their reaction to the announcement that only one former British paratrooper is to be charged in connection with the killings of civil rights demonstrators in Northern Ireland on Bloody Sunday in January 1972. Bloody Sunday was an incident on 30 January 1972 in the Bogside area of Derry, Northern Ireland, when British soldiers shot 28 unarmed civilians during a protest march against internment. Fourteen people died: thirteen were killed outright, while the death of another man four months later was attributed to his injuries. Many of the victims were shot while fleeing from the soldiers and some were shot while trying to help the wounded. Other protesters were injured by rubber bullets or batons, and two were run down by army vehicles. The march had been organized by the Northern Ireland Civil Rights Association (NICRA). The soldiers involved were members of the 1st Battalion, Parachute Regiment, also known as "1 Para".
MINIMUM PRICE $100
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President of Sinn Fein is Michelle O'Neill gives her reaction to the announcement that only one former British paratrooper is to be charged in connection with the killings of civil rights demonstrators in Northern Ireland on Bloody Sunday in January 1972. Bloody Sunday was an incident on 30 January 1972 in the Bogside area of Derry, Northern Ireland, when British soldiers shot 28 unarmed civilians during a protest march against internment. Fourteen people died: thirteen were killed outright, while the death of another man four months later was attributed to his injuries. Many of the victims were shot while fleeing from the soldiers and some were shot while trying to help the wounded. Other protesters were injured by rubber bullets or batons, and two were run down by army vehicles. The march had been organized by the Northern Ireland Civil Rights Association (NICRA). The soldiers involved were members of the 1st Battalion, Parachute Regiment, also known as "1 Para".
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A mural in the Bogside area of Derry depicting Fr Edward Daly waving a white handkerchief as he led Jackie Duddy away from danger on Bloody Sunday Fr. Daly became an international figure after he was witnessed using a blood-stained handkerchief as a white flag in an attempt to escort 17-year-old Jackie Duddy, a wounded protester, to safety. Duddy died of his injuries soon after and Daly administered the last rites; he later described the events as "a young fella who was posing no threat to anybody being shot dead unjustifiably Thirteen innocent civilians people were killed when the British Parachute Regiment opened fire on a civil rights march in Derry. A mural in the Bogside area of Derry depicting Fr Edward Daly waving a white handkerchief as he led Jackie Duddy away from danger on Bloody Sunday Fr. Daly became an international figure after he was witnessed using a blood-stained handkerchief as a white flag in an attempt to escort 17-year-old Jackie Duddy, a wounded protester, to safety. Duddy died of his injuries soon after and Daly administered the last rites; he later described the events as "a young fella who was posing no threat to anybody being shot dead unjustifiably Thirteen innocent civilians people were killed when the British Parachute Regiment opened fire on a civil rights march in Derry.
MINIMUM PRICE $100
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A mural in the Bogside area of Derry depicting Fr Edward Daly waving a white handkerchief as he led Jackie Duddy away from danger on Bloody Sunday Fr. Daly became an international figure after he was witnessed using a blood-stained handkerchief as a white flag in an attempt to escort 17-year-old Jackie Duddy, a wounded protester, to safety. Duddy died of his injuries soon after and Daly administered the last rites; he later described the events as "a young fella who was posing no threat to anybody being shot dead unjustifiably Thirteen innocent civilians people were killed when the British Parachute Regiment opened fire on a civil rights march in Derry.
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IRA graffiti written on the wall of The Castle Inn in Derry, Northern Ireland.
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Rubber and plastic bullets that were uses by British Forces during the Troubles in Northern Ireland on display at on display at the Museum Of Free Derry. The plastic bullet was first used in 1973 by the Royal Ulster Constabulary (RUC), Northern Ireland's police force, and by 1975 it had replaced the rubber bullet.From 1973 to 1981, just over 42,600 plastic bullets were fired in Northern Ireland. By 2005, 125,000 baton rounds had been fired, most of them plastic bullets. Shortly after their introduction it was discovered they were lethal at certain ranges. Fourteen people were killed by plastic bullet impacts; half of them were children and all but one were from the Catholic community. Most of the deaths were allegedly caused by the British security forces misusing the weapon, firing at close range and at chest or head level rather than targeting below the waist. The first person to be killed by a plastic bullet impact was 10-year-old Stephen Geddis, who died on 30 August 1975, two days after being struck in west Belfast.[14] One of the most high-profile victims was 12-year-old Carol Ann Kelly from west Belfast, who died on 22 May 1981, having been struck by a plastic bullet fired by a member of the Royal Fusiliers. In 1982, the European Parliament called on member states to ban the use of plastic bullets. However, they continued to be used by the British security forces in Northern Ireland. In 1984 the United Campaign Against Plastic Bullets was founded, calling for plastic bullets to be banned in Northern Ireland. One of its founders, Emma Groves, had been permanently blinded in 1971 when a British soldier shot her in the face with a rubber bullet.
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EN_01363395_2362 AFP
TOPSHOT - A pedestrian walks past a mural commemorating the victims of the 1972 Bloody Sunday killings in the Bogside area of Derry (Londonderry), Northern Ireland, on March 13, 2019. - Prosecutors will announce on Madch 14, 2019 if British soldiers involved in the January 30, 1972 "Bloody Sunday" killings in Derry (Londonderry) will face court action. (Photo by Paul FAITH / AFP)

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