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Projekt bazy marsjańskiej (6)

EN_01339288_0001 COV
VIDEO AVAILABLE: info@cover-images.com Is this life on Mars? Humans living in a 3-metre-thick igloo? Scientists at Switzerland's École Polytechnique Fédérale de Lausanne (EPFL) have mapped out the steps required to build a self-sustaining research base on Mars that would be habitable for the long term. Their work can help researchers set priorities for space programs exploring Mars as well as the solar system as a whole. If there was ever life on Mars, its traces are most likely to be found at the planet’s poles. Or more specifically, in its polar layered deposits, which are layers of ice and dust that have built up over thousands of years. So, according to a team of EPFL scientists, the poles would be the most logical place to set up a research base and, potentially, colonies. This team has mapped out a step-by-step strategy along with the required technology to build a research base on Mars that would be self-sustaining and that could accommodate a long-term manned presence. The results of their work will soon be published in Acta Astronautica and was presented this month (September) at the Entretiens Internationaux du Tourisme du Futur conference in Vixouze, France. “The poles may pose more challenges in the beginning, but they are the best location for the long term since they harbor natural resources that we may be able to use,” says Anne-Marlene Rüede, lead author of the study and a student minoring in Space Technology at EPFL’s Space Engineering Center (eSpace). And even though the scientists are thinking well into the future – colonies that would be developed over several generations – they still went into great detail in their design. “We wanted to develop a strategy based on technologies that have been selected accordingly and outline a test scenario so that 20 years from now, astronauts will be able to carry out this kind of space mission,” she adds. First the base, then the crew The EPFL scientists’ strategy involves sending a
=MANDATORY CREDIT: ©EPFL//Cover Images. Only for use in this story. Editorial Use Only. No stock, books, advertising or merchandising without photographer's permission **VIDEO AVAILABLE: info@cover-images.com
EN_01339288_0002 COV
VIDEO AVAILABLE: info@cover-images.com Is this life on Mars? Humans living in a 3-metre-thick igloo? Scientists at Switzerland's École Polytechnique Fédérale de Lausanne (EPFL) have mapped out the steps required to build a self-sustaining research base on Mars that would be habitable for the long term. Their work can help researchers set priorities for space programs exploring Mars as well as the solar system as a whole. If there was ever life on Mars, its traces are most likely to be found at the planet’s poles. Or more specifically, in its polar layered deposits, which are layers of ice and dust that have built up over thousands of years. So, according to a team of EPFL scientists, the poles would be the most logical place to set up a research base and, potentially, colonies. This team has mapped out a step-by-step strategy along with the required technology to build a research base on Mars that would be self-sustaining and that could accommodate a long-term manned presence. The results of their work will soon be published in Acta Astronautica and was presented this month (September) at the Entretiens Internationaux du Tourisme du Futur conference in Vixouze, France. “The poles may pose more challenges in the beginning, but they are the best location for the long term since they harbor natural resources that we may be able to use,” says Anne-Marlene Rüede, lead author of the study and a student minoring in Space Technology at EPFL’s Space Engineering Center (eSpace). And even though the scientists are thinking well into the future – colonies that would be developed over several generations – they still went into great detail in their design. “We wanted to develop a strategy based on technologies that have been selected accordingly and outline a test scenario so that 20 years from now, astronauts will be able to carry out this kind of space mission,” she adds. First the base, then the crew The EPFL scientists’ strategy involves sending a
=MANDATORY CREDIT: ©EPFL//Cover Images. Only for use in this story. Editorial Use Only. No stock, books, advertising or merchandising without photographer's permission **VIDEO AVAILABLE: info@cover-images.com
EN_01339288_0003 COV
VIDEO AVAILABLE: info@cover-images.com Is this life on Mars? Humans living in a 3-metre-thick igloo? Scientists at Switzerland's École Polytechnique Fédérale de Lausanne (EPFL) have mapped out the steps required to build a self-sustaining research base on Mars that would be habitable for the long term. Their work can help researchers set priorities for space programs exploring Mars as well as the solar system as a whole. If there was ever life on Mars, its traces are most likely to be found at the planet’s poles. Or more specifically, in its polar layered deposits, which are layers of ice and dust that have built up over thousands of years. So, according to a team of EPFL scientists, the poles would be the most logical place to set up a research base and, potentially, colonies. This team has mapped out a step-by-step strategy along with the required technology to build a research base on Mars that would be self-sustaining and that could accommodate a long-term manned presence. The results of their work will soon be published in Acta Astronautica and was presented this month (September) at the Entretiens Internationaux du Tourisme du Futur conference in Vixouze, France. “The poles may pose more challenges in the beginning, but they are the best location for the long term since they harbor natural resources that we may be able to use,” says Anne-Marlene Rüede, lead author of the study and a student minoring in Space Technology at EPFL’s Space Engineering Center (eSpace). And even though the scientists are thinking well into the future – colonies that would be developed over several generations – they still went into great detail in their design. “We wanted to develop a strategy based on technologies that have been selected accordingly and outline a test scenario so that 20 years from now, astronauts will be able to carry out this kind of space mission,” she adds. First the base, then the crew The EPFL scientists’ strategy involves sending a
=MANDATORY CREDIT: ©EPFL//Cover Images. Only for use in this story. Editorial Use Only. No stock, books, advertising or merchandising without photographer's permission **VIDEO AVAILABLE: info@cover-images.com
EN_01339288_0004 COV
VIDEO AVAILABLE: info@cover-images.com Is this life on Mars? Humans living in a 3-metre-thick igloo? Scientists at Switzerland's École Polytechnique Fédérale de Lausanne (EPFL) have mapped out the steps required to build a self-sustaining research base on Mars that would be habitable for the long term. Their work can help researchers set priorities for space programs exploring Mars as well as the solar system as a whole. If there was ever life on Mars, its traces are most likely to be found at the planet’s poles. Or more specifically, in its polar layered deposits, which are layers of ice and dust that have built up over thousands of years. So, according to a team of EPFL scientists, the poles would be the most logical place to set up a research base and, potentially, colonies. This team has mapped out a step-by-step strategy along with the required technology to build a research base on Mars that would be self-sustaining and that could accommodate a long-term manned presence. The results of their work will soon be published in Acta Astronautica and was presented this month (September) at the Entretiens Internationaux du Tourisme du Futur conference in Vixouze, France. “The poles may pose more challenges in the beginning, but they are the best location for the long term since they harbor natural resources that we may be able to use,” says Anne-Marlene Rüede, lead author of the study and a student minoring in Space Technology at EPFL’s Space Engineering Center (eSpace). And even though the scientists are thinking well into the future – colonies that would be developed over several generations – they still went into great detail in their design. “We wanted to develop a strategy based on technologies that have been selected accordingly and outline a test scenario so that 20 years from now, astronauts will be able to carry out this kind of space mission,” she adds. First the base, then the crew The EPFL scientists’ strategy involves sending a
=MANDATORY CREDIT: ©EPFL//Cover Images. Only for use in this story. Editorial Use Only. No stock, books, advertising or merchandising without photographer's permission **VIDEO AVAILABLE: info@cover-images.com
EN_01339288_0005 COV
VIDEO AVAILABLE: info@cover-images.com Is this life on Mars? Humans living in a 3-metre-thick igloo? Scientists at Switzerland's École Polytechnique Fédérale de Lausanne (EPFL) have mapped out the steps required to build a self-sustaining research base on Mars that would be habitable for the long term. Their work can help researchers set priorities for space programs exploring Mars as well as the solar system as a whole. If there was ever life on Mars, its traces are most likely to be found at the planet’s poles. Or more specifically, in its polar layered deposits, which are layers of ice and dust that have built up over thousands of years. So, according to a team of EPFL scientists, the poles would be the most logical place to set up a research base and, potentially, colonies. This team has mapped out a step-by-step strategy along with the required technology to build a research base on Mars that would be self-sustaining and that could accommodate a long-term manned presence. The results of their work will soon be published in Acta Astronautica and was presented this month (September) at the Entretiens Internationaux du Tourisme du Futur conference in Vixouze, France. “The poles may pose more challenges in the beginning, but they are the best location for the long term since they harbor natural resources that we may be able to use,” says Anne-Marlene Rüede, lead author of the study and a student minoring in Space Technology at EPFL’s Space Engineering Center (eSpace). And even though the scientists are thinking well into the future – colonies that would be developed over several generations – they still went into great detail in their design. “We wanted to develop a strategy based on technologies that have been selected accordingly and outline a test scenario so that 20 years from now, astronauts will be able to carry out this kind of space mission,” she adds. First the base, then the crew The EPFL scientists’ strategy involves sending a
=MANDATORY CREDIT: ©EPFL//Cover Images. Only for use in this story. Editorial Use Only. No stock, books, advertising or merchandising without photographer's permission **VIDEO AVAILABLE: info@cover-images.com
EN_01339288_0006 COV
VIDEO AVAILABLE: info@cover-images.com Is this life on Mars? Humans living in a 3-metre-thick igloo? Scientists at Switzerland's École Polytechnique Fédérale de Lausanne (EPFL) have mapped out the steps required to build a self-sustaining research base on Mars that would be habitable for the long term. Their work can help researchers set priorities for space programs exploring Mars as well as the solar system as a whole. If there was ever life on Mars, its traces are most likely to be found at the planet’s poles. Or more specifically, in its polar layered deposits, which are layers of ice and dust that have built up over thousands of years. So, according to a team of EPFL scientists, the poles would be the most logical place to set up a research base and, potentially, colonies. This team has mapped out a step-by-step strategy along with the required technology to build a research base on Mars that would be self-sustaining and that could accommodate a long-term manned presence. The results of their work will soon be published in Acta Astronautica and was presented this month (September) at the Entretiens Internationaux du Tourisme du Futur conference in Vixouze, France. “The poles may pose more challenges in the beginning, but they are the best location for the long term since they harbor natural resources that we may be able to use,” says Anne-Marlene Rüede, lead author of the study and a student minoring in Space Technology at EPFL’s Space Engineering Center (eSpace). And even though the scientists are thinking well into the future – colonies that would be developed over several generations – they still went into great detail in their design. “We wanted to develop a strategy based on technologies that have been selected accordingly and outline a test scenario so that 20 years from now, astronauts will be able to carry out this kind of space mission,” she adds. First the base, then the crew The EPFL scientists’ strategy involves sending a
=MANDATORY CREDIT: ©EPFL//Cover Images. Only for use in this story. Editorial Use Only. No stock, books, advertising or merchandising without photographer's permission **VIDEO AVAILABLE: info@cover-images.com

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