Friday, October 19, 2018
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Australijczyk z rzadką grupą krwi uratował miliony dzieci (5)

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An Australian donor with a rare blood type is retiring after saving the lives of over 2.4 million babies. Known as ??sThe Man with the Golden Arm,??? James Harrison has rare antibodies in his blood and decades of regular blood donations to the Australian Red Cross Blood Service have helped create a vaccine called Anti-D. The formula was developed to fight against Rhesus disease - a deadly condition where antibodies in a pregnant woman???s blood destroy her baby???s blood cells within the womb. Now aged 81, Harrison has recently given his final blood plasma donation, bringing the total to an amazing 1,173. When Harrison was just 14 years old, he underwent life-threatening lung surgery, which left him hospitalised for three months. His life was saved thanks to transfusions of donated blood, which inspired him to become a donor himself. Australia???s former regulations meant Harrison had to wait until he was 18, but he stayed true to his word and has been donating blood every week ever since, for the last 60 years. When doctors discovered Harrison???s precious antibody, they guessed it could be down to his earlier blood transfusions as a teenager. Jemma Falkenmire of the Australian Red Cross Blood Service explains the rarity of Harrison???s blood type: ??sEvery bag of blood is precious, but James??? blood is particularly extraordinary. Every batch of Anti-D that has ever been made in Australia has come from James??? blood.??? She continues, ??sAnd more than 17% of women in Australia are at risk, so James has helped save a lot of lives.??? Having now surpassed the donor age limit, Harrison humbly tells CNN, ??sI???d keep on going if they???d let me.??? Having received the Medal of the Order of Australia in 1999, Harrison???s remarkable generosity has made him a hero to many around the world. The Blood Service is also today issuing a call for more male donors to follow in Mr Harrison???s footsteps. ??sAustralia owes a big thank you to James Harrison, Australia be
EDITORIAL USE ONLY. IMAGES ONLY TO BE USED IN CONJUNCTION WITH EDITORIAL STORY. IMAGE COPYRIGHT REMAINS WITH THE AUSTRALIAN RED CROSS BLOOD SERVICE.
EN_01321019_0002 COV
An Australian donor with a rare blood type is retiring after saving the lives of over 2.4 million babies. Known as ??sThe Man with the Golden Arm,??? James Harrison has rare antibodies in his blood and decades of regular blood donations to the Australian Red Cross Blood Service have helped create a vaccine called Anti-D. The formula was developed to fight against Rhesus disease - a deadly condition where antibodies in a pregnant woman???s blood destroy her baby???s blood cells within the womb. Now aged 81, Harrison has recently given his final blood plasma donation, bringing the total to an amazing 1,173. When Harrison was just 14 years old, he underwent life-threatening lung surgery, which left him hospitalised for three months. His life was saved thanks to transfusions of donated blood, which inspired him to become a donor himself. Australia???s former regulations meant Harrison had to wait until he was 18, but he stayed true to his word and has been donating blood every week ever since, for the last 60 years. When doctors discovered Harrison???s precious antibody, they guessed it could be down to his earlier blood transfusions as a teenager. Jemma Falkenmire of the Australian Red Cross Blood Service explains the rarity of Harrison???s blood type: ??sEvery bag of blood is precious, but James??? blood is particularly extraordinary. Every batch of Anti-D that has ever been made in Australia has come from James??? blood.??? She continues, ??sAnd more than 17% of women in Australia are at risk, so James has helped save a lot of lives.??? Having now surpassed the donor age limit, Harrison humbly tells CNN, ??sI???d keep on going if they???d let me.??? Having received the Medal of the Order of Australia in 1999, Harrison???s remarkable generosity has made him a hero to many around the world. The Blood Service is also today issuing a call for more male donors to follow in Mr Harrison???s footsteps. ??sAustralia owes a big thank you to James Harrison, Australia be
EDITORIAL USE ONLY. IMAGES ONLY TO BE USED IN CONJUNCTION WITH EDITORIAL STORY. IMAGE COPYRIGHT REMAINS WITH THE AUSTRALIAN RED CROSS BLOOD SERVICE.
EN_01321019_0003 COV
An Australian donor with a rare blood type is retiring after saving the lives of over 2.4 million babies. Known as ??sThe Man with the Golden Arm,??? James Harrison has rare antibodies in his blood and decades of regular blood donations to the Australian Red Cross Blood Service have helped create a vaccine called Anti-D. The formula was developed to fight against Rhesus disease - a deadly condition where antibodies in a pregnant woman???s blood destroy her baby???s blood cells within the womb. Now aged 81, Harrison has recently given his final blood plasma donation, bringing the total to an amazing 1,173. When Harrison was just 14 years old, he underwent life-threatening lung surgery, which left him hospitalised for three months. His life was saved thanks to transfusions of donated blood, which inspired him to become a donor himself. Australia???s former regulations meant Harrison had to wait until he was 18, but he stayed true to his word and has been donating blood every week ever since, for the last 60 years. When doctors discovered Harrison???s precious antibody, they guessed it could be down to his earlier blood transfusions as a teenager. Jemma Falkenmire of the Australian Red Cross Blood Service explains the rarity of Harrison???s blood type: ??sEvery bag of blood is precious, but James??? blood is particularly extraordinary. Every batch of Anti-D that has ever been made in Australia has come from James??? blood.??? She continues, ??sAnd more than 17% of women in Australia are at risk, so James has helped save a lot of lives.??? Having now surpassed the donor age limit, Harrison humbly tells CNN, ??sI???d keep on going if they???d let me.??? Having received the Medal of the Order of Australia in 1999, Harrison???s remarkable generosity has made him a hero to many around the world. The Blood Service is also today issuing a call for more male donors to follow in Mr Harrison???s footsteps. ??sAustralia owes a big thank you to James Harrison, Australia be
EDITORIAL USE ONLY. IMAGES ONLY TO BE USED IN CONJUNCTION WITH EDITORIAL STORY. IMAGE COPYRIGHT REMAINS WITH THE AUSTRALIAN RED CROSS BLOOD SERVICE.
EN_01321019_0004 COV
An Australian donor with a rare blood type is retiring after saving the lives of over 2.4 million babies. Known as ??sThe Man with the Golden Arm,??? James Harrison has rare antibodies in his blood and decades of regular blood donations to the Australian Red Cross Blood Service have helped create a vaccine called Anti-D. The formula was developed to fight against Rhesus disease - a deadly condition where antibodies in a pregnant woman???s blood destroy her baby???s blood cells within the womb. Now aged 81, Harrison has recently given his final blood plasma donation, bringing the total to an amazing 1,173. When Harrison was just 14 years old, he underwent life-threatening lung surgery, which left him hospitalised for three months. His life was saved thanks to transfusions of donated blood, which inspired him to become a donor himself. Australia???s former regulations meant Harrison had to wait until he was 18, but he stayed true to his word and has been donating blood every week ever since, for the last 60 years. When doctors discovered Harrison???s precious antibody, they guessed it could be down to his earlier blood transfusions as a teenager. Jemma Falkenmire of the Australian Red Cross Blood Service explains the rarity of Harrison???s blood type: ??sEvery bag of blood is precious, but James??? blood is particularly extraordinary. Every batch of Anti-D that has ever been made in Australia has come from James??? blood.??? She continues, ??sAnd more than 17% of women in Australia are at risk, so James has helped save a lot of lives.??? Having now surpassed the donor age limit, Harrison humbly tells CNN, ??sI???d keep on going if they???d let me.??? Having received the Medal of the Order of Australia in 1999, Harrison???s remarkable generosity has made him a hero to many around the world. The Blood Service is also today issuing a call for more male donors to follow in Mr Harrison???s footsteps. ??sAustralia owes a big thank you to James Harrison, Australia be
EDITORIAL USE ONLY. IMAGES ONLY TO BE USED IN CONJUNCTION WITH EDITORIAL STORY. IMAGE COPYRIGHT REMAINS WITH THE AUSTRALIAN RED CROSS BLOOD SERVICE.
EN_01321019_0005 COV
An Australian donor with a rare blood type is retiring after saving the lives of over 2.4 million babies. Known as ??sThe Man with the Golden Arm,??? James Harrison has rare antibodies in his blood and decades of regular blood donations to the Australian Red Cross Blood Service have helped create a vaccine called Anti-D. The formula was developed to fight against Rhesus disease - a deadly condition where antibodies in a pregnant woman???s blood destroy her baby???s blood cells within the womb. Now aged 81, Harrison has recently given his final blood plasma donation, bringing the total to an amazing 1,173. When Harrison was just 14 years old, he underwent life-threatening lung surgery, which left him hospitalised for three months. His life was saved thanks to transfusions of donated blood, which inspired him to become a donor himself. Australia???s former regulations meant Harrison had to wait until he was 18, but he stayed true to his word and has been donating blood every week ever since, for the last 60 years. When doctors discovered Harrison???s precious antibody, they guessed it could be down to his earlier blood transfusions as a teenager. Jemma Falkenmire of the Australian Red Cross Blood Service explains the rarity of Harrison???s blood type: ??sEvery bag of blood is precious, but James??? blood is particularly extraordinary. Every batch of Anti-D that has ever been made in Australia has come from James??? blood.??? She continues, ??sAnd more than 17% of women in Australia are at risk, so James has helped save a lot of lives.??? Having now surpassed the donor age limit, Harrison humbly tells CNN, ??sI???d keep on going if they???d let me.??? Having received the Medal of the Order of Australia in 1999, Harrison???s remarkable generosity has made him a hero to many around the world. The Blood Service is also today issuing a call for more male donors to follow in Mr Harrison???s footsteps. ??sAustralia owes a big thank you to James Harrison, Australia be
EDITORIAL USE ONLY. IMAGES ONLY TO BE USED IN CONJUNCTION WITH EDITORIAL STORY. IMAGE COPYRIGHT REMAINS WITH THE AUSTRALIAN RED CROSS BLOOD SERVICE.

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