Thursday, September 21, 2017
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Faszystowskie wino (3)

EN_01268828_0001 EUR
Pic shows: Wine with a label of Adolf Hitler. The Italian parliament is debating a bill which would ban increasingly popular Mussolini and Hitler branded wine and other fascist souvenirs. In comparison to many other European countries such as Austria and Germany where the "use of symbols of unconstitutional organisations" or "re-engagement in National Socialist activities" are forbidden by law, Italy still has an ambiguous relationship with its dark past. Benito Mussolini's 1930s Italy was the breeding ground of the ideology of fascism but there are still plenty of "Il Duce" supporters around today. On the Italian side of the Brenner Pass linking the country to Austria, where Hitler and Mussolini met three times in the 1940s, fascist souvenirs are still widely sold while they are forbidden across the border in Austria. Souvenir shops stock wines with labels featuring Benito Mussolini, Adolf Hitler and other infamous fascists and Nazis. One souvenir shop owner said "it was mainly youngsters" who are buying such souvenirs saying "there is a huge demand." The shopkeeper said: "The images are no problem. Only promoting the system is forbidden." According to Austrian media, the shops on the Italian side of the Brenner Pass are no exception as everywhere in Italy the sale of fascist souvenirs is booming. Yet a new draft law up for discussion in parliament could soon end it all. The new law would forbid the propaganda of fascist and national-socialistic regimes, ban selling Hitler and Mussolini souvenirs and make the fascist "Roman salute" a crime. The draft bill has the backing of the ruling Democratic Party and is likely to pass in the lower house of Italy's parliament due to a Democratic majority, although it is unsure what will happen with it in the Italian senate. Benito Mussolini's own granddaughter, who sits for Silvio Berlusconi's centre-right Forza Italia party in the European Parliament, is one of a colourful variety of lawmakers who vowed to stop the
NAJWYŻSZA DOSTĘPNA ROZDZIELCZOŚĆ
EN_01268828_0002 EUR
Pic shows: Mussolini wine. The Italian parliament is debating a bill which would ban increasingly popular Mussolini and Hitler branded wine and other fascist souvenirs. In comparison to many other European countries such as Austria and Germany where the "use of symbols of unconstitutional organisations" or "re-engagement in National Socialist activities" are forbidden by law, Italy still has an ambiguous relationship with its dark past. Benito Mussolini's 1930s Italy was the breeding ground of the ideology of fascism but there are still plenty of "Il Duce" supporters around today. On the Italian side of the Brenner Pass linking the country to Austria, where Hitler and Mussolini met three times in the 1940s, fascist souvenirs are still widely sold while they are forbidden across the border in Austria. Souvenir shops stock wines with labels featuring Benito Mussolini, Adolf Hitler and other infamous fascists and Nazis. One souvenir shop owner said "it was mainly youngsters" who are buying such souvenirs saying "there is a huge demand." The shopkeeper said: "The images are no problem. Only promoting the system is forbidden." According to Austrian media, the shops on the Italian side of the Brenner Pass are no exception as everywhere in Italy the sale of fascist souvenirs is booming. Yet a new draft law up for discussion in parliament could soon end it all. The new law would forbid the propaganda of fascist and national-socialistic regimes, ban selling Hitler and Mussolini souvenirs and make the fascist "Roman salute" a crime. The draft bill has the backing of the ruling Democratic Party and is likely to pass in the lower house of Italy's parliament due to a Democratic majority, although it is unsure what will happen with it in the Italian senate. Benito Mussolini's own granddaughter, who sits for Silvio Berlusconi's centre-right Forza Italia party in the European Parliament, is one of a colourful variety of lawmakers who vowed to stop the law. MEP Alessandr
NAJWYŻSZA DOSTĘPNA ROZDZIELCZOŚĆ
EN_01268828_0003 EUR
Pic shows: Mussolini wine. The Italian parliament is debating a bill which would ban increasingly popular Mussolini and Hitler branded wine and other fascist souvenirs. In comparison to many other European countries such as Austria and Germany where the "use of symbols of unconstitutional organisations" or "re-engagement in National Socialist activities" are forbidden by law, Italy still has an ambiguous relationship with its dark past. Benito Mussolini's 1930s Italy was the breeding ground of the ideology of fascism but there are still plenty of "Il Duce" supporters around today. On the Italian side of the Brenner Pass linking the country to Austria, where Hitler and Mussolini met three times in the 1940s, fascist souvenirs are still widely sold while they are forbidden across the border in Austria. Souvenir shops stock wines with labels featuring Benito Mussolini, Adolf Hitler and other infamous fascists and Nazis. One souvenir shop owner said "it was mainly youngsters" who are buying such souvenirs saying "there is a huge demand." The shopkeeper said: "The images are no problem. Only promoting the system is forbidden." According to Austrian media, the shops on the Italian side of the Brenner Pass are no exception as everywhere in Italy the sale of fascist souvenirs is booming. Yet a new draft law up for discussion in parliament could soon end it all. The new law would forbid the propaganda of fascist and national-socialistic regimes, ban selling Hitler and Mussolini souvenirs and make the fascist "Roman salute" a crime. The draft bill has the backing of the ruling Democratic Party and is likely to pass in the lower house of Italy's parliament due to a Democratic majority, although it is unsure what will happen with it in the Italian senate. Benito Mussolini's own granddaughter, who sits for Silvio Berlusconi's centre-right Forza Italia party in the European Parliament, is one of a colourful variety of lawmakers who vowed to stop the law. MEP Alessandr
NAJWYŻSZA DOSTĘPNA ROZDZIELCZOŚĆ

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