Thursday, September 19, 2019
close [x]
to:

Universe/Planets (94)

234
... from 5

Pictures

EN_00958297_0947 PHO
Optical image of Mars with an illustration showing it's core, mantle and crust. Current studies say its core consists primarily of iron with about 14-17% sulfur, and is about 1480 km in radius. The core is surrounded by a silicate mantle that formed many of the tectonic and volcanic features on the planet, but now appears to be inactive. The average thickness of the planet's crust is about 50 km, while the maximum thickness is about 125 km. In comparison, Earth's crust, averages 40 km, and is only one third as thick as the crust of Mars.
EN_00958297_0948 PHO
Optical image of Mars with an illustration showing it's core, mantle and crust. Current studies say its core consists primarily of iron with about 14-17% sulfur, and is about 1480 km in radius. The core is surrounded by a silicate mantle that formed many of the tectonic and volcanic features on the planet, but now appears to be inactive. The average thickness of the planet's crust is about 50 km, while the maximum thickness is about 125 km. In comparison, Earth's crust, averages 40 km, and is only one third as thick as the crust of Mars.
EN_00958297_0951 PHO
Illustration showing the core, mantle and crust of Mercury. Geologists estimate that Mercury's core occupies about 42% of its volume; in comparison, for Earth this proportion is 17%. Recent research suggests that Mercury has a molten core with a mantle of silicates, 500-700 km thick, surrounding it. Mercury's crust is believed to be 100-300 km thick based on data gathered from earth based observation, and the mariner 10 mission.
EN_00958297_0952 PHO
Illustration showing the core, mantle and crust of Mercury. Geologists estimate that Mercury's core occupies about 42% of its volume; in comparison, for Earth this proportion is 17%. Recent research suggests that Mercury has a molten core with a mantle of silicates, 500-700 km thick, surrounding it. Mercury's crust is believed to be 100-300 km thick based on data gathered from earth based observation, and the mariner 10 mission.
EN_00958297_0953 PHO
Illustration showing the core, mantle and crust of Venus. It's core consists of rock and ice composed of iron, nickel and silicates. It's mantle is equivalent to 10 to 15 Earth masses and is rich in water, ammonia and methane. The crust atmosphere consists of hydrogen, helium and methane gas.
EN_00958297_0954 PHO
Illustration showing the core, mantle and crust of Venus. It's core consists of rock and ice composed of iron, nickel and silicates. It's mantle is equivalent to 10 to 15 Earth masses and is rich in water, ammonia and methane. The crust atmosphere consists of hydrogen, helium and methane gas.
EN_00958297_0957 PHO
Illustration showing the core, mantle and crust of Saturn. There is no direct information about Saturn's internal structure, although, it is thought to have a similar interior to Jupiter, having a small rocky core surrounded mostly by hydrogen and helium. The rocky core is similar in composition to the Earth, but denser. Above the core there is thought to be a thicker liquid metallic hydrogen layer, with a layer of liquid hydrogen and helium above that, and a gaseous atmosphere in the outermost 1000 km.
EN_00958297_0958 PHO
Illustration showing the core, mantle and crust of Saturn. There is no direct information about Saturn's internal structure, although, it is thought to have a similar interior to Jupiter, having a small rocky core surrounded mostly by hydrogen and helium. The rocky core is similar in composition to the Earth, but denser. Above the core there is thought to be a thicker liquid metallic hydrogen layer, with a layer of liquid hydrogen and helium above that, and a gaseous atmosphere in the outermost 1000 km.
EN_00958297_0959 PHO
Illustration showing the core, mantle and crust of Uranus. The standard model of Uranus's structure is that it consists of three layers: a rocky core in the center, an icy mantle in the middle and an outer gaseous hydrogen/helium envelope. The rocky core of Uranus is relatively small, with a mass of 0.55 Earth masses and a radius less than 20 percent of Uranus's; the mantle is about 13.4 Earth masses, and comprises the bulk of the planet; the upper atmosphere weighs only that of 0.5 Earth masses and extends for the last 20 percent of Uranus's radius.
EN_00958297_0960 PHO
Illustration showing the core, mantle and crust of Uranus. The standard model of Uranus's structure is that it consists of three layers: a rocky core in the center, an icy mantle in the middle and an outer gaseous hydrogen/helium envelope. The rocky core of Uranus is relatively small, with a mass of 0.55 Earth masses and a radius less than 20 percent of Uranus's; the mantle is about 13.4 Earth masses, and comprises the bulk of the planet; the upper atmosphere weighs only that of 0.5 Earth masses and extends for the last 20 percent of Uranus's radius.
EN_00958297_0961 PHO
Illustration showing the core, mantle and crust of Venus. At the center of Venus is a primarily solid iron core, which underlies a thick mantle made mainly of silicate minerals. On top of this is a very thin crust, which is only around 30 kilometers thick (compared to a maximum of around 70 kilometers for Earth's crust). Venus also has a thick, acidic atmosphere, which traps the heat of the Sun (a runaway green house effect). This makes Venus the hottest planet in the solar system, with surface temperatures reaching over 400 degrees Celsius.
EN_00958297_0962 PHO
Illustration showing the core, mantle and crust of Venus. At the center of Venus is a primarily solid iron core, which underlies a thick mantle made mainly of silicate minerals. On top of this is a very thin crust, which is only around 30 kilometers thick (compared to a maximum of around 70 kilometers for Earth's crust). Venus also has a thick, acidic atmosphere, which traps the heat of the Sun (a runaway green house effect). This makes Venus the hottest planet in the solar system, with surface temperatures reaching over 400 degrees Celsius.
EN_90124633_0060 BSI
PHOTO: EAST NEWS/BSIP Le mirage gravitationnel. Repr??sentation du mirage gravitationnel. Ou comment expliquer que l'image d'une galaxie observ??e de la terre est d??form??e par un amas de galaxies situ?? entre les deux.
EN_01231879_2677 EYE
Flying by in early 1986, Voyager 2 captured this picture of Miranda, which enabled scientists to study this moon of Uranus in much greater detail than ever before. Discovered in 1948 by Gerard Peter Kuiper, Miranda is named for the daughter of the wily Prospero in Shakespeare's "The Tempest." It is the eleventh known satellite of Uranus and the innermost large moon of Uranus It was necessary that Voyager 2 passed by Miranda, not for scientific reasons, but simply for the gravity assist it needed to go on to Neptune. Due to the position of the entire Solar System, Miranda provided the energy to throw Voyager 2 to Neptune. Before Voyager, Miranda was largely ignored as it is not the largest moon and did not seem to have any other outstanding qualities. Fortunately, however, Voyager passed close enough to Miranda to provide scientists with fascinating photographs that captivated astronomers. About half ice and half rock, Miranda's surface has terraced layers that indicate both older and new surfaces coexisting. Since the mixing of ancient and recent surfaces is rare in planetary geology, scientists have postulated two explanations for the different ages of the numerous valleys and cliffs on Miranda. One theory is that Miranda could have shattered as many as five times and was then reassembled. Another hypothesis is that partly melted ice upwells forced new surfaces to emerge. Photo Credit: NASA / eyevine For further information please contact eyevine tel: +44 (0) 20 8709 8709 e-mail: info@eyevine.com www.eyevine.com
WORLDWIDE RIGHTS AVAILABLE. End users shall not licence, sell, transmit, or otherwise distribute any photographs represented by eyevine, to any third party.
Want more pictures?
Use search box.

top

234
... from 5