Monday, April 22, 2019
close [x]
to:

Historical artwork (142)

234
678... from 8

Pictures

EN_00957730_1105 PHO
Sketch depicting a method of calculating the sun's elevation. Sketch by R. Dudleo, From "Dell'Arcano del Mare," Florence, 1647; Riccardiana Library, Florence, Italy.
EN_00957730_1106 PHO
Illustration from "Le Grand Atlas de Cosmografie Blaviane," by the Dutch cartographer Johan Blaeu, showing Tycho Brahe's Uraniborg observatory on the island of Hven, Denmark. Riccardana Library; Florence, Italy.
EN_00957730_1107 PHO
Illustration from "Le Grand Atlas de Cosmografie Blaviane," by the Dutch cartographer Johan Blaeu, showing Tycho Brahe's Uraniborg observatory on the island of Hven, Denmark. Riccardana Library; Florence, Italy.
EN_00957730_1108 PHO
Illustration from "Le Grand Atlas de Cosmografie Blaviane," by the Dutch cartographer Johan Blaeu, showing Tycho Brahe's Uraniborg observatory on the island of Hven, Denmark. Riccardana Library; Florence, Italy.
EN_00957730_1109 PHO
Illustration from "Le Grand Atlas de Cosmografie Blaviane," by the Dutch cartographer Johan Blaeu, showing Tycho Brahe's Uraniborg observatory on the island of Hven, Denmark. Riccardana Library; Florence, Italy.
EN_00957730_1110 PHO
Illustration of an equatorial armillary sphere, containing one and a half circles, in Tycho Brahe's observatory. From "Le Grand Atlas de Cosmografia Blaviane," by the Dutch cartographer Johan Blaeu. Riccardana Library; Florence, Italy.
EN_00957730_1791 PHO
Illustration of the "Leviathan of Parsonstown," a 72-inch reflecting telescope built in the 1840s by William Parsons, 3rd Earl of Rosse, on his estate in Parsonstown, Ireland. The telescope mirror was made from speculum metal, which tarnished so quickly that it had to be repolished every six months.
EN_00957730_2000 PHO
Illustration from "Le Grand Atlas de Cosmografie Blaviane," by the Dutch cartographer Johan Blaeu, showing Tycho Brahe's Uraniborg observatory on the island of Hven, Denmark. Riccardana Library; Florence, Italy.
EN_00957730_2099 PHO
Quadrant was used by Hevelius in the 17th century to measure the position of celestial bodies.
EN_00957730_2447 PHO
A map of the world, taken from Ptolemy's book "Geographia."
EN_00957730_2895 PHO
Astronomical clock.
EN_00957730_2896 PHO
An astronomical sextant belonging to Tycho Brahe (1546-1601), the Danish astronomer, astrologer and alchemist. After becoming interested in astronomy as a student in Copenhagen, Tycho Brahe realized the difficulty of making accurate measurements of celestial bodies with the instruments of the day. His designs for new methods and devices won him great fame. He was granted an estate on the island of Hven to conduct his research, and funding to built the Uraniborg observatory. From there he generated the most accurate astronomical data of his time. He was exiled to Prague in 1597 and was assisted in his work there by Johannes Kepler until his death. Due to a duelling injury at university, he always wore a metal nose prosthetic.
EN_00957730_2898 PHO
An illustration showing a person calculating the angle between Aldebaran (the brightest star in the constellation Taurus) and the moon, with respect to the ecliptic.
EN_00957730_2908 PHO
An eighteenth century illustration of a celestial sphere, or rather a representation of the hemisphere of the heavens that can be seen from the northern half of Earth. The moveable horizon can be adjusted to represent the horizon of any observer, whether at the equator or the north pole, but it always cuts the ecliptic at 0 degrees Aries and 0 degrees Libra.
EN_00957730_2910 PHO
Christoph Scheiner (c.1573-1650), a German Jesuit father, physicist and astronomer, and a co-discoverer of sunspots.
EN_00957730_2917 PHO
Provided with a model of the celestial sphere, reference books and dividers, a medieval astrologer draws up a horoscope in this engraving from Robert Fludd's "History of Two Worlds." A celestial sphere is a representation of the heavens as seen from Earth.
EN_00957730_2918 PHO
An equatorial telescope, mounted so that it has two axes of motion at right angles to each other, one parallel to the axis of the earth.
EN_00957730_2928 PHO
In 1575, when the Ottoman empire was at its height, the astronomer Taqi ad-Din founded an observatory at Galata (now part of Istanbul, Turkey). This painting of the time shows the astronomers with their equipment, which includes a globe, a sand glass for timing, items for drawing, and all kinds of sighting devices.
EN_00957730_2934 PHO
An illustration of the northern hemisphere of a brass celestial globe belonging to Major-General Sir John Malcolm. The brass globe was made by Muhammad ibn Hilal, possibly from Maragha, north-west Iran, AD 1275-76.
EN_00957730_2935 PHO
An illustration of the southern hemisphere of a brass celestial globe belonging to Major-General Sir John Malcolm. The brass globe was made by Muhammad ibn Hilal, possibly from Maragha, north-west Iran, AD 1275-76.

top

234
678... from 8