Thursday, May 23, 2019
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Historical artwork (142)

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Pictures

EN_00958297_0605 PHO
An illustration ridiculing the practice of astrology.
EN_00958297_0606 PHO
As astronomers began to explore the physical nature of comets, they found that meteors came from dust left by comets. Major meteor showers such as the Leonids, seen here as they appeared on November 12, 1799, occurred as Earth plowed through a river of comet dust. In 1833 and in 1866 additional recurrences of a Leonid meteor 'storm' helped lead to the discovery of the parent comet from which meteors came. (From the Midnight Sky, by Edwin Dunkin, 1869).
EN_00958297_0607 PHO
As astronomers began to explore the physical nature of comets, they found that meteors came from dust left by comets. Major meteor showers such as the Leonids, seen here as they appeared on November 12, 1799, occurred as Earth plowed through a river of comet dust. In 1833 and in 1866 additional recurrences of a Leonid meteor 'storm' helped lead to the discovery of the parent comet from which meteors came. (From the Midnight Sky, by Edwin Dunkin, 1869).
EN_00958297_0608 PHO
As astronomers began to explore the physical nature of comets, they found that meteors came from dust left by comets. Major meteor showers such as the Leonids, seen here as they appeared on November 12, 1799, occurred as Earth plowed through a river of comet dust. In 1833 and in 1866 additional recurrences of a Leonid meteor 'storm' helped lead to the discovery of the parent comet from which meteors came. (From the Midnight Sky, by Edwin Dunkin, 1869).
EN_00958297_0609 PHO
Comets universally foretold disasters and misfortune until the start of the scientific revolution. For example, public fears linked the Great Comet of 1556, shown in a woodcut from a German pamphlet, with earthquakes in that same year. Another century and more would pass before the growth of mathematical astronomy could seriously challenge credulous views of comets.
EN_00958297_0610 PHO
Comets universally foretold disasters and misfortune until the start of the scientific revolution. For example, public fears linked the Great Comet of 1556, shown in a woodcut from a German pamphlet, with earthquakes in that same year. Another century and more would pass before the growth of mathematical astronomy could seriously challenge credulous views of comets.
EN_00958297_0613 PHO
Broadside of the 1835 apparition of Halley's comet. Woodcut.
EN_00958297_0614 PHO
Broadside of the 1835 apparition of Halley's comet. Woodcut.
EN_00958297_0620 PHO
An engraving showing Arab astrologers using early astronomical instruments.
EN_00958297_0622 PHO
An illustration ridiculing the practice of astrology.
EN_00958297_0623 PHO
As astronomers began to explore the physical nature of comets, they found that meteors came from dust left by comets. Major meteor showers such as the Leonids, seen here as they appeared on November 12, 1799, occurred as Earth plowed through a river of comet dust. In 1833 and in 1866 additional recurrences of a Leonid meteor 'storm' helped lead to the discovery of the parent comet from which meteors came. (From the Midnight Sky, by Edwin Dunkin, 1869)..
EN_00958297_0624 PHO
Comets universally foretold disasters and misfortune until the start of the scientific revolution. For example, public fears linked the Great Comet of 1556, shown in a woodcut from a German pamphlet, with earthquakes in that same year. Another century and more would pass before the growth of mathematical astronomy could seriously challenge credulous views of comets.
EN_00958297_0627 PHO
Broadside of the 1835 apparition of Halley's comet. Woodcut.
EN_00958297_0740 PHO
The frontispiece of Epistolarum, which Tycho Brahe published himself in 1596, shows the famous mural quadrant used for his observation.
EN_00958297_0741 PHO
The frontispiece of Epistolarum, which Tycho Brahe published himself in 1596, shows the famous mural quadrant used for his observation.
EN_00958297_0765 PHO
The frontispiece of Epistolarum, which Tycho Brahe published himself in 1596, shows the famous mural quadrant used for his observation.
EN_00958297_0828 PHO
Plant cell structure. Artwork of a sectioned plant cell. The features that distinguish a plant cell from an animal cell are the cell wall and the chloroplasts . The large central vacuole also contrasts with the many small vacuoles of an animal cell. Chloroplasts contain a pigment, chlorophyll, which is used in photosynthesis. The nucleus has been cut open to show the nucleolus (sphere), and is found in plant and animal cells, as are the energy-producing mitochondria and peroxisomes.
EN_00957730_1102 PHO
Sketch depicting a method of calculating the sun's elevation. One man keeps the instrument level, while the other man makes adjustments and reads the elevation in degrees. Sketch by R. Dudleo, From "Dell'Arcano del Mare," Florence, 1647; Riccardiana Library, Florence, Italy.
EN_00957730_1103 PHO
Sketch depicting a method of calculating the sun's elevation. One man keeps the instrument level, while the other man makes adjustments and reads the elevation in degrees. Sketch by R. Dudleo, From "Dell'Arcano del Mare," Florence, 1647; Riccardiana Library, Florence, Italy.
EN_00957730_1104 PHO
Sketch depicting a method of calculating the sun's elevation. Sketch by R. Dudleo, From "Dell'Arcano del Mare," Florence, 1647; Riccardiana Library, Florence, Italy.

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