Tuesday, June 18, 2019
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Historical artwork (142)

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Pictures

EN_00958297_0501 PHO
As Samuel Colt originally envisioned his repeating pistol in the patent drawing above, it was to have chambers for 10 cartridges. Other changes, including raising the caliber from 34 to .44, were suggested by a texas ranger, Sam Walker.
EN_00958297_0508 PHO
Hevelius's book on comets. Title page of Cometographia (1668), by the Polish astronomer Johannes Hevelius. The artwork shows three astronomers representing three theories about comets. From left, the theories are: Aristotle's sublunar theory (that comets orbit between the Moon and the Earth); Hevelius's theory that comets originate from Jupiter or Saturn and follow parabolic paths around the Sun; and Kepler's theory that comets move in a straight line. On the roof of the building (right), telescopes and sextants are being used to observe a comet (top left).
EN_00958297_0512 PHO
Demonstration at Cologne Cathedral of the Earth's rotation.
EN_00958297_0516 PHO
Hevelius's book on comets. Title page of Cometographia (1668), by the Polish astronomer Johannes Hevelius. The artwork shows three astronomers representing three theories about comets. From left, the theories are: Aristotle's sublunar theory (that comets orbit between the Moon and the Earth); Hevelius's theory that comets originate from Jupiter or Saturn and follow parabolic paths around the Sun; and Kepler's theory that comets move in a straight line. On the roof of the building (right), telescopes and sextants are being used to observe a comet (top left).
EN_00958297_0524 PHO
Constellation of Leo.
EN_00958297_0539 PHO
Demonstration at Cologne Cathedral of the Earth's rotation.
EN_00958297_0540 PHO
Demonstration at Cologne Cathedral of the Earth's rotation.
EN_00958297_0550 PHO
Apparatus of Johannes Hevelius (about 1640), used for studying the sun. Hevelius, a German astronomer, was also noted for his map of the moon and his star catalogue. His work was typical of the astronomical revolution of the 17th century.
EN_00958297_0561 PHO
Anonymous watercolor depicting the comet of 1680 over the Low Countries.
EN_00958297_0563 PHO
Herschel's galactic model, 1784. This is one of several visualizations drawn by the British astronomer William Herschel (1738-1822). Working with his sister, Caroline, Herschel plotted the position of many of the Milky Way's stars, and used this data to construct models of the Milky Way galaxy, as seen from the outside. The crosses represent stars, while the letters refer to specific stars and constellations. The model is not particularly accurate, but does show the central band of stars that is the central plane of our galaxy. A version of this model was published in Account of Some Observations Tending to Investigate the Construction of the Heavens (Philosophical Transactions of the Royal Society of London, volume 74, 1784).
EN_00958297_0564 PHO
A rendering of the reflecting telescope used by William Herschel, the discoverer of the planet Uranus. Astronomical Society of the Pacific.
EN_00958297_0567 PHO
Anonymous watercolor depicting the comet of 1680 over the Low Countries.
EN_00958297_0568 PHO
Anonymous watercolor depicting the comet of 1680 over the Low Countries.
EN_00958297_0577 PHO
Herschel's galactic model, 1784. This is one of several visualizations drawn by the British astronomer William Herschel (1738-1822). Working with his sister, Caroline, Herschel plotted the position of many of the Milky Way's stars, and used this data to construct models of the Milky Way galaxy, as seen from the outside. The crosses represent stars, while the letters refer to specific stars and constellations. The model is not particularly accurate, but does show the central band of stars that is the central plane of our galaxy. A version of this model was published in Account of Some Observations Tending to Investigate the Construction of the Heavens (Philosophical Transactions of the Royal Society of London, volume 74, 1784).
EN_00958297_0578 PHO
Herschel's galactic model, 1784. This is one of several visualizations drawn by the British astronomer William Herschel (1738-1822). Working with his sister, Caroline, Herschel plotted the position of many of the Milky Way's stars, and used this data to construct models of the Milky Way galaxy, as seen from the outside. The crosses represent stars, while the letters refer to specific stars and constellations. The model is not particularly accurate, but does show the central band of stars that is the central plane of our galaxy. A version of this model was published in Account of Some Observations Tending to Investigate the Construction of the Heavens (Philosophical Transactions of the Royal Society of London, volume 74, 1784).
EN_00958297_0579 PHO
Herschel's galactic model, 1784. This is one of several visualizations drawn by the British astronomer William Herschel (1738-1822). Working with his sister, Caroline, Herschel plotted the position of many of the Milky Way's stars, and used this data to construct models of the Milky Way galaxy, as seen from the outside. The crosses represent stars, while the letters refer to specific stars and constellations. The model is not particularly accurate, but does show the central band of stars that is the central plane of our galaxy. A version of this model was published in Account of Some Observations Tending to Investigate the Construction of the Heavens (Philosophical Transactions of the Royal Society of London, volume 74, 1784).
EN_00958297_0582 PHO
A rendering of the reflecting telescope used by William Herschel, the discoverer of the planet Uranus. Astronomical Society of the Pacific.
EN_00958297_0583 PHO
A rendering of the reflecting telescope used by William Herschel, the discoverer of the planet Uranus. Astronomical Society of the Pacific.
EN_00958297_0584 PHO
A rendering of the reflecting telescope used by William Herschel, the discoverer of the planet Uranus. Astronomical Society of the Pacific.
EN_00958297_0604 PHO
An illustration ridiculing the practice of astrology.

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