Tuesday, January 22, 2019
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Prehistory (663)

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Pictures

! EN_01354334_0360 SCI
Ceratosaurus dinosaur defecating, illustration. This large theropod dinosaur lived during the Late Jurassic, 153-148 million years ago. It was a bipedal predator, using its teeth and hind claws to bring down its prey. It reached lengths of 6 to 7 metres. Shown here (red) are the large nasal horn and ridges in front of each eye. A coprolite is the fossilized feces of a prehistoric animal. As it is rare that a sample can be accurately related to a specific genus of animal, coprolites are usually classified according to their own taxonomy.
! EN_01354334_0361 SCI
Dinosaurs of southern Europe, illustration. The dinosaurs shown here range from large sauropods, to bipedal theropods and winged bird-like dinosaurs. Some are herbivores, while others are carnivorous predators and scavengers. This scene is from the Jurassic, 201 to 145 million years ago.
! EN_01354334_0362 SCI
Dinosaurs of southern Europe, illustration. The dinosaurs shown here range from large sauropods, to bipedal theropods and winged bird-like dinosaurs. Some are herbivores, while others are carnivorous predators and scavengers. This scene is from the Jurassic, 201 to 145 million years ago.
! EN_01354334_0392 SCI
Unenlagia dinosaurs, illustration. Unenlagia (meaning 'half-bird') was a theropod dinosaur that lived during the Late Cretaceous period around 90 million years ago, in what is now Argentina. It was around 3 metres in length from head to tail.
! EN_01354334_0393 SCI
Volaticotherium prehistoric gliding mammal, illustration. This extinct insectivorous mammal (Volaticotherium antiquum) lived during the Jurassic, around 164 million years ago. Its fossils have been found in Inner Mongolia, China. It was similar to the modern flying squirrel.
! EN_01354334_0394 SCI
Yanoconodon prehistoric mammal, illustration. This prehistoric mammal (Yanoconodon allini) lived 125 million years ago during the Cretaceous. It was unknown until a fossil was discovered in Hebei Province in China, with the results being published in 2007. The fossil was well-preserved, and the structure of the bones of its middle ear provided important evidence on the early evolution of mammals. This mammal also has lumbar ribs, a rare feature among modern mammals.
! EN_01309402_0065 SPL
Illustration of a giraffatitan dinosaur. Giraffatitan was previously thought to be a species of brachiosaurus (B. brancai) but is now thought to belong to a separate genus. These animals were sauropods, four-legged, plant-eating dinosaurs from the Jurassic period. They reached a maximum length of about 26 metres and weighed up to 40 tonnes. The skeletons of Brachiosaurus and Giraffatitan, although coming from different continents (America and Africa, respectively) look almost identical to the untrained eye, so this picture could represent either animal.
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! EN_01309402_0068 SPL
Illustration of a giraffatitan dinosaur. Giraffatitan was previously thought to be a species of brachiosaurus (B. brancai) but is now thought to belong to a separate genus. These animals were sauropods, four-legged, plant-eating dinosaurs from the Jurassic period. They reached a maximum length of about 26 metres and weighed up to 40 tonnes. The skeletons of Brachiosaurus and Giraffatitan, although coming from different continents (America and Africa, respectively) look almost identical to the untrained eye, so this picture could represent either animal.
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! EN_01309402_0072 SPL
Illustration of a giraffatitan dinosaur mother and infant. Giraffatitan was previously thought to be a species of brachiosaurus (B. brancai) but is now thought to belong to a separate genus. These animals were sauropods, four-legged, plant-eating dinosaurs from the Jurassic period. They reached a maximum length of about 26 metres and weighed up to 40 tonnes. The skeletons of Brachiosaurus and Giraffatitan, although coming from different continents (America and Africa, respectively) look almost identical to the untrained eye, so this picture could represent either animal.
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! EN_01309402_0073 SPL
Illustration of a giraffatitan dinosaur. Giraffatitan was previously thought to be a species of brachiosaurus (B. brancai) but is now thought to belong to a separate genus. These animals were sauropods, four-legged, plant-eating dinosaurs from the Jurassic period. They reached a maximum length of about 26 metres and weighed up to 40 tonnes. The skeletons of Brachiosaurus and Giraffatitan, although coming from different continents (America and Africa, respectively) look almost identical to the untrained eye, so this picture could represent either animal.
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! EN_01292973_0450 SCI
Miacis, illustration. This extinct prehistoric mammal lived from the Late Paleocene to the Late Eocene (from around 59 to 33 million years ago). It was an early ancestor of the animals grouped under Carnivora. Miacis was weasel-sized (similar to a pine marten), probably preying on smaller animals in a forest environment. Its fossils have been found in North America and Eurasia,
! EN_01202639_0001 SCI
Terror bird (Titanis walleri) with prey, artwork. This extinct, flightless bird lived in North and South America approximately 2-5 million years ago. It stood 2.5 metres tall weighed roughly 150 kilograms. It belonged to the Phorusrhacidae family of carnivorous flightless birds, commonly referred to as the terror birds. Like other members of its family, Titanis had a huge head with a large curved beak, powerful claws and tiny wings. The prehistoric horse shown as killed prey and in the background are ^IHipparion sp^i.
! EN_01202639_0005 SCI
Archaeopteryx. Artwork of the prehistoric feathered reptile Archaeopteryx which lived around 150 million years ago. Discovered in 1861 in southern Germany, it was the first feathered fossil specimen ever found. Despite possessing bird-like feathers, wings and a wishbone, Archaeopteryx also had sharp teeth, finger digits and a bony tail similar to non-bird predatory dinosaurs. This species and numerous other feathered fossils support the theory that modern day birds evolved from prehistoric theropod dinosaurs.
! EN_01202639_0006 SCI
Aurornis. Artwork of the prehistoric feathered reptile Aurornis which lived around 160 million years ago. Discovered in 2013 in China, it is considered the oldest known example of a bird-like dinosaur. Despite possessing feathers, wings and a wishbone, Aurornis also had sharp teeth, forelimb digits and a bony tail similar to non-bird predatory dinosaurs. It was not capable of powered flight but may have been able to glide. This species and numerous other feathered fossils support the theory that modern day birds evolved from prehistoric theropod dinosaurs.
! EN_01202639_0007 SCI
Confuciusornis. Artwork of the prehistoric bird Confuciusornis which lived around 125-120 million years ago. Discovered in 1993 in Liaoning, China, specimens had bird-like wings and feathers, short tail bone with long tail feathers and a toothless beak. The wings possessed small claws. The large number of fossils discovered suggests that it lived in large flocks. This species and numerous other feathered fossils support the theory that modern day birds evolved from prehistoric theropod dinosaurs.
! EN_01202639_0008 SCI
Enantiornithes. Artwork of prehistoric birds from the group Enantiornithes which existed 129-66 million years ago. Seen here flying in flocks and perched on top of Parasaurolophus dinosaurs. With well developed wings and feathers Enantiornithes were capable of powered flight. They also possessed clawed finger digits and toothed jaws similar to their non bird-like dinosaur ancestors. This species and numerous other feathered fossils support the theory that modern day birds evolved from prehistoric theropod dinosaurs.
! EN_01202639_0009 SCI
Hesperornis, prehistoric bird, artwork. This species of bird lived 84-78 million years ago. With strong hindlegs and long, streamlined body, it was ideally adapted to an aquatic environment. Its long slender neck and toothed beak help it to capture prey but it had only tiny wings and was not capable of flight or even much use in swimming.
! EN_01202639_0010 SCI
Ichthyornis, prehistoric bird, artwork. This species of bird lived 95-85 million years ago. They are seen here attacking a pterosaur. Ichthyornis possessed toothed beaks and were very capable flyers. They are thought to have lived in a niche very similar to modern day seagulls.
! EN_01202639_0011 SCI
Microraptor, artwork. This prehistoric feathered dinosaur lived around 125-120 million years ago. It possessed long bird-like feathers on its tail, arms and legs and may have been capable of powered flight, although gliding ability is more likely. This species and numerous other feathered fossils support the theory that modern day birds evolved from prehistoric theropod dinosaurs.
! EN_01202639_0012 SCI
Patagopteryx (Patagopteryx deferrariisi), prehistoric bird, artwork. This species, depicted here following a herd of sauropods, lived in Patagonia, Argentina around 80 million years ago. With only small wings and no wishbone, they were unable to fly. However its skeleton reveals that ancestors of Patagopteryx could once fly, making it the earliest example of secondary flightlessness in bird evolution. The discovery of numerous feathered dinosaur fossils support the theory that modern day birds evolved from prehistoric theropod dinosaurs.

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