poniedziałek, 24 listopada 2014
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Syberyjska wiewiórka latająca (9)

EN_01071153_0822
MUST CREDIT: Masatsugu Ohashi/Rex Features Mandatory Credit: Photo by Masatsugu Ohashi / Rex Features (2121816a) Siberian flying squirrel (AKA Russian flying squirrel) Siberian Flying Squirrels: Are These The World's Cutest Creatures... If a prize is being handed out for the world's cutest creature, the Siberian flying squirrel may easily win. These large-eyed tree-dwellers could come from a Disney film with their large eyes and, seemingly, expressive features. Two squirrels in particular appear to be giving their cutest poses for the camera and one hilarious image, showing a squirrel peering out from a nest hole, is crying out for the caption "Peek-a-boo!" Photographer Masatsugu Ohashi captured these awww-some images of the tiny animals, also known as Russian flying squirrels, on the Japanese island of Hokkaido. The reclusive creatures are shy, nocturnal animals and in winter may sleep continuously for several days. Seldom seen, they like to inhabit trees in which woodpeckers have left holes suitable for comfy nests. Masatsugu explains: "The squirrels make this tree a nest every year when it is winter. Five of them live communally in the cold season. "It is early morning and in the evening they become active. They are almost always in the nest so chances of photographing them in the daytime are difficult." They get their name from their ability to escape predators by gliding from tree to tree by spreading out a thin flap of skin and stretching out all of their limbs. The squirrels prefer tall pine, cedar or spruce trees where they can use abandoned woodpecker holes as nests rather than making one themselves. MUST CREDIT: Masatsugu Ohashi/Rex Features For more information visit http://www.rexfeatures.com/stacklink/CRGUSIMKR
MUST CREDIT: Masatsugu Ohashi/Rex Features
EN_01071153_0823
MUST CREDIT: Masatsugu Ohashi/Rex Features Mandatory Credit: Photo by Masatsugu Ohashi / Rex Features (2121816b) Siberian flying squirrels (AKA Russian flying squirrels) Siberian Flying Squirrels: Are These The World's Cutest Creatures... If a prize is being handed out for the world's cutest creature, the Siberian flying squirrel may easily win. These large-eyed tree-dwellers could come from a Disney film with their large eyes and, seemingly, expressive features. Two squirrels in particular appear to be giving their cutest poses for the camera and one hilarious image, showing a squirrel peering out from a nest hole, is crying out for the caption "Peek-a-boo!" Photographer Masatsugu Ohashi captured these awww-some images of the tiny animals, also known as Russian flying squirrels, on the Japanese island of Hokkaido. The reclusive creatures are shy, nocturnal animals and in winter may sleep continuously for several days. Seldom seen, they like to inhabit trees in which woodpeckers have left holes suitable for comfy nests. Masatsugu explains: "The squirrels make this tree a nest every year when it is winter. Five of them live communally in the cold season. "It is early morning and in the evening they become active. They are almost always in the nest so chances of photographing them in the daytime are difficult." They get their name from their ability to escape predators by gliding from tree to tree by spreading out a thin flap of skin and stretching out all of their limbs. The squirrels prefer tall pine, cedar or spruce trees where they can use abandoned woodpecker holes as nests rather than making one themselves. MUST CREDIT: Masatsugu Ohashi/Rex Features For more information visit http://www.rexfeatures.com/stacklink/CRGUSIMKR
MUST CREDIT: Masatsugu Ohashi/Rex Features
EN_01071153_0824
MUST CREDIT: Masatsugu Ohashi/Rex Features Mandatory Credit: Photo by Masatsugu Ohashi / Rex Features (2121816c) Siberian flying squirrel (AKA Russian flying squirrel) Siberian Flying Squirrels: Are These The World's Cutest Creatures... If a prize is being handed out for the world's cutest creature, the Siberian flying squirrel may easily win. These large-eyed tree-dwellers could come from a Disney film with their large eyes and, seemingly, expressive features. Two squirrels in particular appear to be giving their cutest poses for the camera and one hilarious image, showing a squirrel peering out from a nest hole, is crying out for the caption "Peek-a-boo!" Photographer Masatsugu Ohashi captured these awww-some images of the tiny animals, also known as Russian flying squirrels, on the Japanese island of Hokkaido. The reclusive creatures are shy, nocturnal animals and in winter may sleep continuously for several days. Seldom seen, they like to inhabit trees in which woodpeckers have left holes suitable for comfy nests. Masatsugu explains: "The squirrels make this tree a nest every year when it is winter. Five of them live communally in the cold season. "It is early morning and in the evening they become active. They are almost always in the nest so chances of photographing them in the daytime are difficult." They get their name from their ability to escape predators by gliding from tree to tree by spreading out a thin flap of skin and stretching out all of their limbs. The squirrels prefer tall pine, cedar or spruce trees where they can use abandoned woodpecker holes as nests rather than making one themselves. MUST CREDIT: Masatsugu Ohashi/Rex Features For more information visit http://www.rexfeatures.com/stacklink/CRGUSIMKR
MUST CREDIT: Masatsugu Ohashi/Rex Features
EN_01071153_0825
MUST CREDIT: Masatsugu Ohashi/Rex Features Mandatory Credit: Photo by Masatsugu Ohashi / Rex Features (2121816d) Siberian flying squirrel (AKA Russian flying squirrel) Siberian Flying Squirrels: Are These The World's Cutest Creatures... If a prize is being handed out for the world's cutest creature, the Siberian flying squirrel may easily win. These large-eyed tree-dwellers could come from a Disney film with their large eyes and, seemingly, expressive features. Two squirrels in particular appear to be giving their cutest poses for the camera and one hilarious image, showing a squirrel peering out from a nest hole, is crying out for the caption "Peek-a-boo!" Photographer Masatsugu Ohashi captured these awww-some images of the tiny animals, also known as Russian flying squirrels, on the Japanese island of Hokkaido. The reclusive creatures are shy, nocturnal animals and in winter may sleep continuously for several days. Seldom seen, they like to inhabit trees in which woodpeckers have left holes suitable for comfy nests. Masatsugu explains: "The squirrels make this tree a nest every year when it is winter. Five of them live communally in the cold season. "It is early morning and in the evening they become active. They are almost always in the nest so chances of photographing them in the daytime are difficult." They get their name from their ability to escape predators by gliding from tree to tree by spreading out a thin flap of skin and stretching out all of their limbs. The squirrels prefer tall pine, cedar or spruce trees where they can use abandoned woodpecker holes as nests rather than making one themselves. MUST CREDIT: Masatsugu Ohashi/Rex Features For more information visit http://www.rexfeatures.com/stacklink/CRGUSIMKR
MUST CREDIT: Masatsugu Ohashi/Rex Features
EN_01071153_0826
MUST CREDIT: Masatsugu Ohashi/Rex Features Mandatory Credit: Photo by Masatsugu Ohashi / Rex Features (2121816e) Siberian flying squirrel (AKA Russian flying squirrel) peeks out of its nest Siberian Flying Squirrels: Are These The World's Cutest Creatures... If a prize is being handed out for the world's cutest creature, the Siberian flying squirrel may easily win. These large-eyed tree-dwellers could come from a Disney film with their large eyes and, seemingly, expressive features. Two squirrels in particular appear to be giving their cutest poses for the camera and one hilarious image, showing a squirrel peering out from a nest hole, is crying out for the caption "Peek-a-boo!" Photographer Masatsugu Ohashi captured these awww-some images of the tiny animals, also known as Russian flying squirrels, on the Japanese island of Hokkaido. The reclusive creatures are shy, nocturnal animals and in winter may sleep continuously for several days. Seldom seen, they like to inhabit trees in which woodpeckers have left holes suitable for comfy nests. Masatsugu explains: "The squirrels make this tree a nest every year when it is winter. Five of them live communally in the cold season. "It is early morning and in the evening they become active. They are almost always in the nest so chances of photographing them in the daytime are difficult." They get their name from their ability to escape predators by gliding from tree to tree by spreading out a thin flap of skin and stretching out all of their limbs. The squirrels prefer tall pine, cedar or spruce trees where they can use abandoned woodpecker holes as nests rather than making one themselves. MUST CREDIT: Masatsugu Ohashi/Rex Features For more information visit http://www.rexfeatures.com/stacklink/CRGUSIMKR
MUST CREDIT: Masatsugu Ohashi/Rex Features
EN_01071153_0827
MUST CREDIT: Masatsugu Ohashi/Rex Features Mandatory Credit: Photo by Masatsugu Ohashi / Rex Features (2121816f) Siberian flying squirrel (AKA Russian flying squirrel) Siberian Flying Squirrels: Are These The World's Cutest Creatures... If a prize is being handed out for the world's cutest creature, the Siberian flying squirrel may easily win. These large-eyed tree-dwellers could come from a Disney film with their large eyes and, seemingly, expressive features. Two squirrels in particular appear to be giving their cutest poses for the camera and one hilarious image, showing a squirrel peering out from a nest hole, is crying out for the caption "Peek-a-boo!" Photographer Masatsugu Ohashi captured these awww-some images of the tiny animals, also known as Russian flying squirrels, on the Japanese island of Hokkaido. The reclusive creatures are shy, nocturnal animals and in winter may sleep continuously for several days. Seldom seen, they like to inhabit trees in which woodpeckers have left holes suitable for comfy nests. Masatsugu explains: "The squirrels make this tree a nest every year when it is winter. Five of them live communally in the cold season. "It is early morning and in the evening they become active. They are almost always in the nest so chances of photographing them in the daytime are difficult." They get their name from their ability to escape predators by gliding from tree to tree by spreading out a thin flap of skin and stretching out all of their limbs. The squirrels prefer tall pine, cedar or spruce trees where they can use abandoned woodpecker holes as nests rather than making one themselves. MUST CREDIT: Masatsugu Ohashi/Rex Features For more information visit http://www.rexfeatures.com/stacklink/CRGUSIMKR
MUST CREDIT: Masatsugu Ohashi/Rex Features
EN_01071153_0828
MUST CREDIT: Masatsugu Ohashi/Rex Features Mandatory Credit: Photo by Masatsugu Ohashi / Rex Features (2121816g) Siberian flying squirrel (AKA Russian flying squirrel) Siberian Flying Squirrels: Are These The World's Cutest Creatures... If a prize is being handed out for the world's cutest creature, the Siberian flying squirrel may easily win. These large-eyed tree-dwellers could come from a Disney film with their large eyes and, seemingly, expressive features. Two squirrels in particular appear to be giving their cutest poses for the camera and one hilarious image, showing a squirrel peering out from a nest hole, is crying out for the caption "Peek-a-boo!" Photographer Masatsugu Ohashi captured these awww-some images of the tiny animals, also known as Russian flying squirrels, on the Japanese island of Hokkaido. The reclusive creatures are shy, nocturnal animals and in winter may sleep continuously for several days. Seldom seen, they like to inhabit trees in which woodpeckers have left holes suitable for comfy nests. Masatsugu explains: "The squirrels make this tree a nest every year when it is winter. Five of them live communally in the cold season. "It is early morning and in the evening they become active. They are almost always in the nest so chances of photographing them in the daytime are difficult." They get their name from their ability to escape predators by gliding from tree to tree by spreading out a thin flap of skin and stretching out all of their limbs. The squirrels prefer tall pine, cedar or spruce trees where they can use abandoned woodpecker holes as nests rather than making one themselves. MUST CREDIT: Masatsugu Ohashi/Rex Features For more information visit http://www.rexfeatures.com/stacklink/CRGUSIMKR
MUST CREDIT: Masatsugu Ohashi/Rex Features
EN_01071153_0829
MUST CREDIT: Masatsugu Ohashi/Rex Features Mandatory Credit: Photo by Masatsugu Ohashi / Rex Features (2121816h) Siberian flying squirrel (AKA Russian flying squirrel) Siberian Flying Squirrels: Are These The World's Cutest Creatures... If a prize is being handed out for the world's cutest creature, the Siberian flying squirrel may easily win. These large-eyed tree-dwellers could come from a Disney film with their large eyes and, seemingly, expressive features. Two squirrels in particular appear to be giving their cutest poses for the camera and one hilarious image, showing a squirrel peering out from a nest hole, is crying out for the caption "Peek-a-boo!" Photographer Masatsugu Ohashi captured these awww-some images of the tiny animals, also known as Russian flying squirrels, on the Japanese island of Hokkaido. The reclusive creatures are shy, nocturnal animals and in winter may sleep continuously for several days. Seldom seen, they like to inhabit trees in which woodpeckers have left holes suitable for comfy nests. Masatsugu explains: "The squirrels make this tree a nest every year when it is winter. Five of them live communally in the cold season. "It is early morning and in the evening they become active. They are almost always in the nest so chances of photographing them in the daytime are difficult." They get their name from their ability to escape predators by gliding from tree to tree by spreading out a thin flap of skin and stretching out all of their limbs. The squirrels prefer tall pine, cedar or spruce trees where they can use abandoned woodpecker holes as nests rather than making one themselves. MUST CREDIT: Masatsugu Ohashi/Rex Features For more information visit http://www.rexfeatures.com/stacklink/CRGUSIMKR
MUST CREDIT: Masatsugu Ohashi/Rex Features
EN_01071153_0830
MUST CREDIT: Masatsugu Ohashi/Rex Features Mandatory Credit: Photo by Masatsugu Ohashi / Rex Features (2121816i) Siberian Flying Squirrels: Are These The World's Cutest Creatures... If a prize is being handed out for the world's cutest creature, the Siberian flying squirrel may easily win. These large-eyed tree-dwellers could come from a Disney film with their large eyes and, seemingly, expressive features. Two squirrels in particular appear to be giving their cutest poses for the camera and one hilarious image, showing a squirrel peering out from a nest hole, is crying out for the caption "Peek-a-boo!" Photographer Masatsugu Ohashi captured these awww-some images of the tiny animals, also known as Russian flying squirrels, on the Japanese island of Hokkaido. The reclusive creatures are shy, nocturnal animals and in winter may sleep continuously for several days. Seldom seen, they like to inhabit trees in which woodpeckers have left holes suitable for comfy nests. Masatsugu explains: "The squirrels make this tree a nest every year when it is winter. Five of them live communally in the cold season. "It is early morning and in the evening they become active. They are almost always in the nest so chances of photographing them in the daytime are difficult." They get their name from their ability to escape predators by gliding from tree to tree by spreading out a thin flap of skin and stretching out all of their limbs. The squirrels prefer tall pine, cedar or spruce trees where they can use abandoned woodpecker holes as nests rather than making one themselves. MUST CREDIT: Masatsugu Ohashi/Rex Features For more information visit http://www.rexfeatures.com/stacklink/CRGUSIMKR
MUST CREDIT: Masatsugu Ohashi/Rex Features
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