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James Cameron spenetrował Rów Mariański (8)

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Explorer James Cameron emerges from the DEEPSEA CHALLENGER submersible after his successful solo dive March 26, 2012 to the Mariana Trench, the deepest part of the ocean. Cameron plunged about seven miles (11 kilometers) to the bottom of the Marina Trench in the western Pacific, where temperatures are barely above freezing and the pressure is a crushing thousand times that at sea level. The dive was part of DEEPSEA CHALLENGE, a joint scientific expedition by Cameron, the National Geographic Society and Rolex to conduct deep-ocean research. One-time use for coverage or promotion of DEEPSEA CHALLENGE dated 2012 and exclusively in conjunction thereof. Copying, distribution, archiving, sublicensing, sale, or resale of the image is prohibited. AFP PHOTO/HANDOUT/ Mark Thiessen/National Geographic Filmmaker and National Geographic == One-time use for coverage or promotion of DEEPSEA CHALLENGE dated 2012 and exclusively in conjunction thereof. Copying, distribution, archiving, sublicensing, sale, or resale of the image is prohibited == DEFAULT: Failure to comply with the prohibitions and requirements set forth above will obligate the individual or entity receiving this image to pay a fee determined by National Geographic.
= RESTRICTED TO EDITORIAL USE - MANDATORY CREDIT " AFP PHOTO / Mark Thiessen/National Geographic Filmmaker and National Geographic " - NO MARKETING NO ADVERTISING CAMPAIGNS - DISTRIBUTED AS A SERVICE TO CLIENTS =
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Filmmaker and National Geographic Explorer-in-Residence James Cameron gives two thumbs-up as he emerges from the DEEPSEA CHALLENGER submersible after his successful solo dive March 26, 2012 to the Mariana Trench, the deepest part of the ocean. Cameron plunged about seven miles (11 kilometers) to the bottom of the Marina Trench in the western Pacific, where temperatures are barely above freezing and the pressure is a crushing thousand times that at sea level. The dive was part of DEEPSEA CHALLENGE, a joint scientific expedition by Cameron, the National Geographic Society and Rolex to conduct deep-ocean research. One-time use for coverage or promotion of DEEPSEA CHALLENGE dated 2012 and exclusively in conjunction thereof. Copying, distribution, archiving, sublicensing, sale, or resale of the image is prohibited. AFP PHOTO/HANDOUT/ Mark Thiessen/National Geographic == One-time use for coverage or promotion of DEEPSEA CHALLENGE dated 2012 and exclusively in conjunction thereof. Copying, distribution, archiving, sublicensing, sale, or resale of the image is prohibited == DEFAULT: Failure to comply with the prohibitions and requirements set forth above will obligate the individual or entity receiving this image to pay a fee determined by National Geographic.
= RESTRICTED TO EDITORIAL USE - MANDATORY CREDIT " AFP PHOTO / Mark Thiessen/National Geographic Filmmaker and National Geographic " - NO MARKETING NO ADVERTISING CAMPAIGNS - DISTRIBUTED AS A SERVICE TO CLIENTS =
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Filmmaker and National Geographic Explorer-in-Residence James Cameron holds the National Geographic Society flag after he successfully completed the first ever solo dive to the Mariana Trench March 26, 2012, the deepest part of the ocean. Cameron plunged about seven miles (11 kilometers) to the bottom of the Marina Trench in the western Pacific, where temperatures are barely above freezing and the pressure is a crushing thousand times that at sea level. The dive was part of DEEPSEA CHALLENGE, a joint scientific expedition by Cameron, the National Geographic Society and Rolex to conduct deep-ocean research. One-time use for coverage or promotion of DEEPSEA CHALLENGE dated 2012 and exclusively in conjunction thereof. Copying, distribution, archiving, sublicensing, sale, or resale of the image is prohibited. AFP PHOTO/HANDOUT/ Mark Thiessen/National Geographic == One-time use for coverage or promotion of DEEPSEA CHALLENGE dated 2012 and exclusively in conjunction thereof. Copying, distribution, archiving, sublicensing, sale, or resale of the image is prohibited == DEFAULT: Failure to comply with the prohibitions and requirements set forth above will obligate the individual or entity receiving this image to pay a fee determined by National Geographic.
== NO ARCHIVE = RESTRICTED TO EDITORIAL USE - MANDATORY CREDIT " AFP PHOTO / Mark Thiessen/National Geographic Filmmaker and National Geographic " - NO MARKETING NO ADVERTISING CAMPAIGNS - DISTRIBUTED AS A SERVICE TO CLIENTS =
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National Geographic Filmmaker and National Geographic Explorer-in-Residence James Cameron is congratulated by ocean explorer and US. Navy Capt. Don Walsh(RET.)(R) after completing the first ever solo dive to "Challenger Deep," the lowest part of the Mariana Trench. Walsh took the same journey to the bottom of the Mariana Trench 52 years ago in the bathyscaphe Trieste, with Swiss oceanographer Jacques Piccard. Cameron's dive in his specially designed submersible was part of DEEPSEA CHALLENGE, a joint scientific expedition by Cameron, the National Geographic Society and Rolex to conduct deep-ocean research. Cameron plunged about seven miles (11 kilometers) to the bottom of the Marina Trench in the western Pacific, where temperatures are barely above freezing and the pressure is a crushing thousand times that at sea level. AFP PHOTO/HANDOUT/ Mark Thiessen/National Geographic == One-time use for coverage or promotion of DEEPSEA CHALLENGE dated 2012 and exclusively in conjunction thereof. Copying, distribution, archiving, sublicensing, sale, or resale of the image is prohibited.== One-time use for coverage or promotion of DEEPSEA CHALLENGE dated 2012 and exclusively in conjunction thereof. Copying, distribution, archiving, sublicensing, sale, or resale of the image is prohibited == DEFAULT: Failure to comply with the prohibitions and requirements set forth above will obligate the individual or entity receiving this image to pay a fee determined by National Geographic.
== NO ARCHIVE = RESTRICTED TO EDITORIAL USE - MANDATORY CREDIT " AFP PHOTO / Mark Thiessen/National Geographic Filmmaker and National Geographic " - NO MARKETING NO ADVERTISING CAMPAIGNS - DISTRIBUTED AS A SERVICE TO CLIENTS =
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The DEEPSEA CHALLENGER submersible carrying filmmaker and National Geographic Explorer-in-Residence James Cameron is hoisted into the Pacific Ocean March 26, 2012 on its way to the "Challenger Deep," the deepest part of the Mariana Trench. Cameron plunged about seven miles (11 kilometers) to the bottom of the Marina Trench in the western Pacific, where temperatures are barely above freezing and the pressure is a crushing thousand times that at sea level. Cameron's dive in his specially designed submersible was part of DEEPSEA CHALLENGE, a joint scientific expedition by Cameron, the National Geographic Society and Rolex to conduct deep-ocean research. AFP PHOTO/HANDOUT/ Mark Thiessen/National Geographic == One-time use for coverage or promotion of DEEPSEA CHALLENGE dated 2012 and exclusively in conjunction thereof. Copying, distribution, archiving, sublicensing, sale, or resale of the image is prohibited == DEFAULT: Failure to comply with the prohibitions and requirements set forth above will obligate the individual or entity receiving this image to pay a fee determined by National Geographic==
== NO ARCHIVE = RESTRICTED TO EDITORIAL USE - MANDATORY CREDIT " AFP PHOTO / Mark Thiessen/National Geographic Filmmaker and National Geographic " - NO MARKETING NO ADVERTISING CAMPAIGNS - DISTRIBUTED AS A SERVICE TO CLIENTS =
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Filmmaker and National Geographic Explorer-in-Residence James Cameron slides into the hatch of the DEEPSEA CHALLENGER submersible March 26, 2012 as he prepares for his record dive to the bottom of the Mariana Trench. Cameron plunged about seven miles (11 kilometers) to the bottom of the Marina Trench in the western Pacific, where temperatures are barely above freezing and the pressure is a crushing thousand times that at sea level. Cameron's dive in his specially designed submersible was part of DEEPSEA CHALLENGE, a joint scientific expedition by Cameron, the National Geographic Society and Rolex to conduct deep-ocean research. AFP PHOTO/HANDOUT/ Mark Thiessen/National Geographic == One-time use for coverage or promotion of DEEPSEA CHALLENGE dated 2012 and exclusively in conjunction thereof. Copying, distribution, archiving, sublicensing, sale, or resale of the image is prohibited == DEFAULT: Failure to comply with the prohibitions and requirements set forth above will obligate the individual or entity receiving this image to pay a fee determined by National Geographic==
== NO ARCHIVE = RESTRICTED TO EDITORIAL USE - MANDATORY CREDIT " AFP PHOTO / Mark Thiessen/National Geographic Filmmaker and National Geographic " - NO MARKETING NO ADVERTISING CAMPAIGNS - DISTRIBUTED AS A SERVICE TO CLIENTS =
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Filmmaker and National Geographic Explorer-in-Residence James Cameron(L) has a final conversation March 26, 2012 with ocean explorer and US Navy Capt. Don Walsh(R), just before the hatch on the DEEPSEA CHALLENGER submersible is closed and the voyage to the deepest part of the ocean begins. Walsh took the same journey to the bottom of the Mariana Trench 52 years ago in the bathyscaphe Trieste, with Swiss oceanographer Jacques Piccard. Cameron is the first person to complete the dive solo. Cameron plunged about seven miles (11 kilometers) to the bottom of the Marina Trench in the western Pacific, where temperatures are barely above freezing and the pressure is a crushing thousand times that at sea level. Cameron's dive in his specially designed submersible was part of DEEPSEA CHALLENGE, a joint scientific expedition by Cameron, the National Geographic Society and Rolex to conduct deep-ocean research. AFP PHOTO/HANDOUT/ Mark Thiessen/National Geographic == One-time use for coverage or promotion of DEEPSEA CHALLENGE dated 2012 and exclusively in conjunction thereof. Copying, distribution, archiving, sublicensing, sale, or resale of the image is prohibited == DEFAULT: Failure to comply with the prohibitions and requirements set forth above will obligate the individual or entity receiving this image to pay a fee determined by National Geographic==
== NO ARCHIVE = RESTRICTED TO EDITORIAL USE - MANDATORY CREDIT " AFP PHOTO / Mark Thiessen/National Geographic Filmmaker and National Geographic " - NO MARKETING NO ADVERTISING CAMPAIGNS - DISTRIBUTED AS A SERVICE TO CLIENTS =
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This February 2012 handout photo provided by National Geographic shows the DEEPSEA CHALLENGER submersible begining its first test dive off the coast of Papua New Guinea. Earth's lost frontier, the deepest part of the oceans where the pressure is like three SUVs sitting on your little tow, is about to be explored first-hand. It's been more than half a century since man dared to plunge that deep. Earth's lost frontier is about to be explored firsthand after more than half a century. It's a mission to the deepest part of the ocean, so deep that the pressure is the equivalent of three SUVs sitting on your toe. And it's being launched by the rich and famous. In the next several days, James Cameron, the director of "Titanic," "Avatar" and "The Abyss," plans to dive nearly 7 miles deep in a one-man sub he helped design. The location is the Mariana Trench in the South Pacific. "It's the last frontier for science and exploration on this planet," Cameron said. (AP Photo/Mark Thiessen, National Geographic)
FEBRUARY 2012 HANDOUT PHOTO PROVIDED BY NATIONAL GEOGRAPHIC / ONE-TIME USE ONLY / NO ARCHIVES
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