czwartek, 31 lipca 2014
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Indie - narasta problem elektronicznego złomu (68)

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EN_00950732_0040
October 1, 2010, Delhi, India: E-waste has come the fastest growing waste stream in the world. India receives as much e-waste as it generates internally generating an approximate 145,000 tones of e-waste each year. Almost all of it, is being recycled in many poor urban locality exposing people and environment to hazardous heavy metals and deadly toxins such as lead, cadmium, beryllium and BFR (Brominated Flame Retardants) that needs to be handled safely so that it does not jeopardize either the workers involved in recycling on the environment. Almost all electronic and electrical appliances, like computers, mobile phones, iPods, refrigerators, washing machines, televisions etc, constitute e-waste after being discarded. The recycling of e-waste has emerged as a lucrative business. These products are stripped down to yield valuable metals like platinum, gold and copper///Boy in Shastri park one of the main recycling areas in Delhi. Credit: Maro Kouri / Polaris
No publication in Greece
EN_00950732_0041
October 1, 2010, Delhi, India: E-waste has come the fastest growing waste stream in the world. The UN Enviroment Developed nations dump e-waste in developing Asian countries (India, Bangladesh, China and Pakistan) through illegal trade routes. India receives as much e-waste as it generates internally (approximate 145,000 tones each year). Almost all of it, is being recycled in many poor urban locality exposing people and environment to hazardous heavy metals and deadly toxins such as lead, cadmium, beryllium and BFR (Brominated Flame Retardants). E-waste needs to be handled safely so that it does not jeopardize either the workers involved in recycling on the environment. Almost all electronic and electrical appliances, like computers, mobile phones, iPods, refrigerators, washing machines, televisions etc, constitute e-waste after being discarded. The recycling of e-waste has emerged as a lucrative business. These products are stripped down to yield valuable metals like platinum, gold and copper////Boy plays outside an informal recycling unit of Shastri Park- a main recycling area in Delhi. Credit: Maro Kouri / Polaris
No publication in Greece
EN_00950732_0042
October 1, 2010, Delhi, India: E-waste has come the fastest growing waste stream in the world. The UN Enviroment Developed nations dump e-waste in developing Asian countries (India, Bangladesh, China and Pakistan) through illegal trade routes. India receives as much e-waste as it generates internally (approximate 145,000 tones each year). Almost all of it, is being recycled in many poor urban locality exposing people and environment to hazardous heavy metals and deadly toxins such as lead, cadmium, beryllium and BFR (Brominated Flame Retardants). E-waste needs to be handled safely so that it does not jeopardize either the workers involved in recycling on the environment. Almost all electronic and electrical appliances, like computers, mobile phones, iPods, refrigerators, washing machines, televisions etc, constitute e-waste after being discarded. The recycling of e-waste has emerged as a lucrative business. These products are stripped down to yield valuable metals like platinum, gold and copper///Boy plays outside an informal recycling unit of Shastri Park - a main recycling area in Delhi. Credit: Maro Kouri / Polaris
No publication in Greece
EN_00950732_0043
October 1, 2010, Delhi, India: E-waste has come the fastest growing waste stream in the world. The UN Enviroment Developed nations dump e-waste in developing Asian countries (India, Bangladesh, China and Pakistan) through illegal trade routes. India receives as much e-waste as it generates internally (approximate 145,000 tones each year). Almost all of it, is being recycled in many poor urban locality exposing people and environment to hazardous heavy metals and deadly toxins such as lead, cadmium, beryllium and BFR (Brominated Flame Retardants). E-waste needs to be handled safely so that it does not jeopardize either the workers involved in recycling on the environment. Almost all electronic and electrical appliances, like computers, mobile phones, iPods, refrigerators, washing machines, televisions etc, constitute e-waste after being discarded. The recycling of e-waste has emerged as a lucrative business. These products are stripped down to yield valuable metals like platinum, gold and copper///Old man came from Uttar Pardesh, one of the poorest places of India, to work in Shastri Park, a main main recycling ares of Delhi. He breaks an a/c stabilizer at an informal recycling unit. Credit: Maro Kouri / Polaris
No publication in Greece
EN_00950732_0044
October 1, 2010, Delhi, India: E-waste has come the fastest growing waste stream in the world. The UN Enviroment Developed nations dump e-waste in developing Asian countries (India, Bangladesh, China and Pakistan) through illegal trade routes. India receives as much e-waste as it generates internally (approximate 145,000 tones each year). Almost all of it, is being recycled in many poor urban locality exposing people and environment to hazardous heavy metals and deadly toxins such as lead, cadmium, beryllium and BFR (Brominated Flame Retardants). E-waste needs to be handled safely so that it does not jeopardize either the workers involved in recycling on the environment. Almost all electronic and electrical appliances, like computers, mobile phones, iPods, refrigerators, washing machines, televisions etc, constitute e-waste after being discarded. The recycling of e-waste has emerged as a lucrative business. These products are stripped down to yield valuable metals like platinum, gold and copper///Old man came from Uttar Pardesh, one of the poorest places of India, to work in Shastri Park, a main main recycling ares of Delhi. He breaks an a/c stabilizer at an informal recycling unit. Credit: Maro Kouri / Polaris
No publication in Greece
EN_00950732_0045
October 1, 2010, Delhi, India: E-waste has come the fastest growing waste stream in the world. The UN Enviroment Developed nations dump e-waste in developing Asian countries (India, Bangladesh, China and Pakistan) through illegal trade routes. India receives as much e-waste as it generates internally (approximate 145,000 tones each year). Almost all of it, is being recycled in many poor urban locality exposing people and environment to hazardous heavy metals and deadly toxins such as lead, cadmium, beryllium and BFR (Brominated Flame Retardants). E-waste needs to be handled safely so that it does not jeopardize either the workers involved in recycling on the environment. Almost all electronic and electrical appliances, like computers, mobile phones, iPods, refrigerators, washing machines, televisions etc, constitute e-waste after being discarded. The recycling of e-waste has emerged as a lucrative business. These products are stripped down to yield valuable metals like platinum, gold and copper///Old man came from Uttar Pardesh, one of the poorest places of India, to work in Shastri Park, a main main recycling ares of Delhi. He breaks an a/c stabilizer at an informal recycling unit. Credit: Maro Kouri / Polaris
No publication in Greece
EN_00950732_0046
October 1, 2010, Delhi, India: E-waste has come the fastest growing waste stream in the world. The UN Enviroment Developed nations dump e-waste in developing Asian countries (India, Bangladesh, China and Pakistan) through illegal trade routes. India receives as much e-waste as it generates internally (approximate 145,000 tones each year). Almost all of it, is being recycled in many poor urban locality exposing people and environment to hazardous heavy metals and deadly toxins such as lead, cadmium, beryllium and BFR (Brominated Flame Retardants). E-waste needs to be handled safely so that it does not jeopardize either the workers involved in recycling on the environment. Almost all electronic and electrical appliances, like computers, mobile phones, iPods, refrigerators, washing machines, televisions etc, constitute e-waste after being discarded. The recycling of e-waste has emerged as a lucrative business. These products are stripped down to yield valuable metals like platinum, gold and copper///20y Amir dismantles mouses at an informal recycling unit in Shastri Park, one of the mainest recycling areas in Delhi. Credit: Maro Kouri / Polaris
No publication in Greece
EN_00950732_0047
October 1, 2010, Delhi, India: The UN Enviroment Developed nations dump e-waste in developing Asian countries (India, Bangladesh, China and Pakistan) through illegal trade routes. India receives as much e-waste as it generates internally (approximate 145,000 tones each year). Almost all of it, is being recycled in many poor urban locality exposing people and environment to hazardous heavy metals and deadly toxins such as lead, cadmium, beryllium and BFR (Brominated Flame Retardants). E-waste needs to be handled safely so that it does not jeopardize either the workers involved in recycling on the environment. Almost all electronic and electrical appliances, like computers, mobile phones, iPods, refrigerators, washing machines, televisions etc, constitute e-waste after being discarded. The recycling of e-waste has emerged as a lucrative business. These products are stripped down to yield valuable metals like platinum, gold and copper///4 men play ludo at their brake outside an informal recycling unit in Shastri park, a main recycling area in Delhi. Credit: Maro Kouri / Polaris
No publication in Greece
EN_00950732_0048
October 1, 2010, Delhi, India: E-waste has come the fastest growing waste stream in the world. The UN Enviroment Developed nations dump e-waste in developing Asian countries (India, Bangladesh, China and Pakistan) through illegal trade routes. India receives as much e-waste as it generates internally (approximate 145,000 tones each year). Almost all of it, is being recycled in many poor urban locality exposing people and environment to hazardous heavy metals and deadly toxins such as lead, cadmium, beryllium and BFR (Brominated Flame Retardants). E-waste needs to be handled safely so that it does not jeopardize either the workers involved in recycling on the environment. Almost all electronic and electrical appliances, like computers, mobile phones, iPods, refrigerators, washing machines, televisions etc, constitute e-waste after being discarded. The recycling of e-waste has emerged as a lucrative business. These products are stripped down to yield valuable metals like platinum, gold and copper///4 men play ludo at their brake outside an informal recycling unit in Shastri park, a main recycling area in Delhi. Credit: Maro Kouri / Polaris
No publication in Greece
EN_00950732_0049
October 1, 2010, Delhi, India: E-waste has come the fastest growing waste stream in the world. The UN Enviroment Developed nations dump e-waste in developing Asian countries (India, Bangladesh, China and Pakistan) through illegal trade routes. India receives as much e-waste as it generates internally (approximate 145,000 tones each year). Almost all of it, is being recycled in many poor urban locality exposing people and environment to hazardous heavy metals and deadly toxins such as lead, cadmium, beryllium and BFR (Brominated Flame Retardants). Almost all electronic and electrical appliances, like computers, mobile phones, iPods, refrigerators, washing machines, televisions etc, constitute e-waste after being discarded. The recycling of e-waste has emerged as a lucrative business. These products are stripped down to yield valuable metals like platinum, gold and copper///Truck carries plastic jerries filled with acid that will used into the illegal and hazardous burning of printed circuit boards at an informal recycling unit. Credit: Maro Kouri / Polaris
No publication in Greece
EN_00950732_0050
October 1, 2010, Delhi, India: E-waste has come the fastest growing waste stream in the world. The UN Enviroment Developed nations dump e-waste in developing Asian countries (India, Bangladesh, China and Pakistan) through illegal trade routes. India receives as much e-waste as it generates internally (approximate 145,000 tones each year). Almost all of it, is being recycled in many poor urban locality exposing people and environment to hazardous heavy metals and deadly toxins such as lead, cadmium, beryllium and BFR (Brominated Flame Retardants). Almost all electronic and electrical appliances, like computers, mobile phones, iPods, refrigerators, washing machines, televisions etc, constitute e-waste after being discarded. The recycling of e-waste has emerged as a lucrative business. These products are stripped down to yield valuable metals like platinum, gold and copper///15y Ladli in sary removes manualy the intergrated circuits (ICs), chips, gold pins, condensers, etc at an informal and illegal recycling unit. Credit: Maro Kouri / Polaris
No publication in Greece
EN_00950732_0051
October 1, 2010, Delhi, India: E-waste has come the fastest growing waste stream in the world. The UN Enviroment Developed nations dump e-waste in developing Asian countries (India, Bangladesh, China and Pakistan) through illegal trade routes. India receives as much e-waste as it generates internally (approximate 145,000 tones each year). Almost all of it, is being recycled in many poor urban locality exposing people and environment to hazardous heavy metals and deadly toxins such as lead, cadmium, beryllium and BFR (Brominated Flame Retardants). Almost all electronic and electrical appliances, like computers, mobile phones, iPods, refrigerators, washing machines, televisions etc, constitute e-waste after being discarded. The recycling of e-waste has emerged as a lucrative business. These products are stripped down to yield valuable metals like platinum, gold and copper///15y Ladli in sary removes manualy the intergrated circuits (ICs), chips, gold pins, condensers, etc at an informal and illegal recycling unit. Credit: Maro Kouri / Polaris
No publication in Greece
EN_00950732_0052
October 1, 2010, Delhi, India: E-waste has come the fastest growing waste stream in the world. The UN Enviroment Developed nations dump e-waste in developing Asian countries (India, Bangladesh, China and Pakistan) through illegal trade routes. India receives as much e-waste as it generates internally (approximate 145,000 tones each year). Almost all of it, is being recycled in many poor urban locality exposing people and environment to hazardous heavy metals and deadly toxins such as lead, cadmium, beryllium and BFR (Brominated Flame Retardants). E-waste needs to be handled safely so that it does not jeopardize either the workers involved in recycling on the environment. Almost all electronic and electrical appliances, like computers, mobile phones, iPods, refrigerators, washing machines, televisions etc, constitute e-waste after being discarded. The recycling of e-waste has emerged as a lucrative business. These products are stripped down to yield valuable metals like platinum, gold and copper. Credit: Maro Kouri / Polaris
No publication in Greece
EN_00950732_0053
October 1, 2010, Delhi, India: E-waste has come the fastest growing waste stream in the world. The UN Enviroment Developed nations dump e-waste in developing Asian countries (India, Bangladesh, China and Pakistan) through illegal trade routes. India receives as much e-waste as it generates internally (approximate 145,000 tones each year). Almost all of it, is being recycled in many poor urban locality exposing people and environment to hazardous heavy metals and deadly toxins such as lead, cadmium, beryllium and BFR (Brominated Flame Retardants). Almost all electronic and electrical appliances, like computers, mobile phones, iPods, refrigerators, washing machines, televisions etc, constitute e-waste after being discarded. The recycling of e-waste has emerged as a lucrative business. These products are stripped down to yield valuable metals like platinum, gold and copper///Men work at an informal and illegaly unit of burning printed circuit boards. Credit: Maro Kouri / Polaris
No publication in Greece
EN_00950732_0054
October 1, 2010, Delhi, India: E-waste has come the fastest growing waste stream in the world. The UN Enviroment Developed nations dump e-waste in developing Asian countries (India, Bangladesh, China and Pakistan) through illegal trade routes. India receives as much e-waste as it generates internally (approximate 145,000 tones each year). Almost all of it, is being recycled in many poor urban locality exposing people and environment to hazardous heavy metals and deadly toxins such as lead, cadmium, beryllium and BFR (Brominated Flame Retardants). Almost all electronic and electrical appliances, like computers, mobile phones, iPods, refrigerators, washing machines, televisions etc, constitute e-waste after being discarded. The recycling of e-waste has emerged as a lucrative business. These products are stripped down to yield valuable metals like platinum, gold and copper///Woman in sary scratch printed circuit boards breathing toxic dust. Credit: Maro Kouri / Polaris
No publication in Greece
EN_00950732_0055
October 1, 2010, Delhi, India: E-waste has come the fastest growing waste stream in the world. The UN Enviroment Developed nations dump e-waste in developing Asian countries (India, Bangladesh, China and Pakistan) through illegal trade routes. India receives as much e-waste as it generates internally (approximate 145,000 tones each year). Almost all of it, is being recycled in many poor urban locality exposing people and environment to hazardous heavy metals and deadly toxins such as lead, cadmium, beryllium and BFR (Brominated Flame Retardants). Almost all electronic and electrical appliances, like computers, mobile phones, iPods, refrigerators, washing machines, televisions etc, constitute e-waste after being discarded. The recycling of e-waste has emerged as a lucrative business. These products are stripped down to yield valuable metals like platinum, gold and copper///Woman in sary scratch printed circuit boards breathing toxic dust. Credit: Maro Kouri / Polaris
No publication in Greece
EN_00950732_0056
October 1, 2010, Delhi, India: E-waste has come the fastest growing waste stream in the world. The UN Enviroment Developed nations dump e-waste in developing Asian countries (India, Bangladesh, China and Pakistan) through illegal trade routes. India receives as much e-waste as it generates internally (approximate 145,000 tones each year). Almost all of it, is being recycled in many poor urban locality exposing people and environment to hazardous heavy metals and deadly toxins such as lead, cadmium, beryllium and BFR (Brominated Flame Retardants). Almost all electronic and electrical appliances, like computers, mobile phones, iPods, refrigerators, washing machines, televisions etc, constitute e-waste after being discarded. The recycling of e-waste has emerged as a lucrative business. These products are stripped down to yield valuable metals like platinum, gold and copper///Woman in sary scratch printed circuit boards breathing toxic dust. Credit: Maro Kouri / Polaris
No publication in Greece
EN_00950732_0057
October 1, 2010, Delhi, India: E-waste has come the fastest growing waste stream in the world. The UN Enviroment Developed nations dump e-waste in developing Asian countries (India, Bangladesh, China and Pakistan) through illegal trade routes. India receives as much e-waste as it generates internally (approximate 145,000 tones each year). Almost all of it, is being recycled in many poor urban locality exposing people and environment to hazardous heavy metals and deadly toxins such as lead, cadmium, beryllium and BFR (Brominated Flame Retardants). Almost all electronic and electrical appliances, like computers, mobile phones, iPods, refrigerators, washing machines, televisions etc, constitute e-waste after being discarded. The recycling of e-waste has emerged as a lucrative business. These products are stripped down to yield valuable metals like platinum, gold and copper///Boy carries water for the waterbath of the delsolderded Printed Circuit Boards (PSBs) which are dipped in acid resulting copper by a very hazardous process. Credit: Maro Kouri / Polaris
No publication in Greece
EN_00950732_0058
October 1, 2010, Delhi, India: E-waste has come the fastest growing waste stream in the world. The UN Enviroment Developed nations dump e-waste in developing Asian countries (India, Bangladesh, China and Pakistan) through illegal trade routes. India receives as much e-waste as it generates internally (approximate 145,000 tones each year). Almost all of it, is being recycled in many poor urban locality exposing people and environment to hazardous heavy metals and deadly toxins such as lead, cadmium, beryllium and BFR (Brominated Flame Retardants). Almost all electronic and electrical appliances, like computers, mobile phones, iPods, refrigerators, washing machines, televisions etc, constitute e-waste after being discarded. The recycling of e-waste has emerged as a lucrative business. These products are stripped down to yield valuable metals like platinum, gold and copper///Boy carries water for the waterbath of the delsolderded Printed Circuit Boards (PSBs) which are dipped in acid resulting copper by a very hazardous process. Credit: Maro Kouri / Polaris
No publication in Greece
EN_00950732_0059
October 1, 2010, Delhi, India: E-waste has come the fastest growing waste stream in the world. The UN Enviroment Developed nations dump e-waste in developing Asian countries (India, Bangladesh, China and Pakistan) through illegal trade routes. India receives as much e-waste as it generates internally (approximate 145,000 tones each year). Almost all of it, is being recycled in many poor urban locality exposing people and environment to hazardous heavy metals and deadly toxins such as lead, cadmium, beryllium and BFR (Brominated Flame Retardants). Almost all electronic and electrical appliances, like computers, mobile phones, iPods, refrigerators, washing machines, televisions etc, constitute e-waste after being discarded. The recycling of e-waste has emerged as a lucrative business. These products are stripped down to yield valuable metals like platinum, gold and copper///Boy carries water for the delsoldered Printed Circuit Booards at an illegal recycling unit. Credit: Maro Kouri / Polaris
No publication in Greece

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